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Slice of Norwich’s history faces demolition threat

PUBLISHED: 16:38 07 April 2018 | UPDATED: 14:53 08 April 2018

Carrow Bridge Master House, which is one of 10 buildings that has been listed by Norfolk County Council as being surplus to its requirements. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY

Carrow Bridge Master House, which is one of 10 buildings that has been listed by Norfolk County Council as being surplus to its requirements. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY

Archant

It’s a familiar sight for the thousands of football fans who pass it on their way to watch Norwich City play at Carrow Road.

Carrow Bridge Master House, which is one of 10 buildings that has been listed by Norfolk County Council as being surplus to its requirements. Picture: DENISE BRADLEYCarrow Bridge Master House, which is one of 10 buildings that has been listed by Norfolk County Council as being surplus to its requirements. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY

But perhaps not for much longer, because the Carrow Bridge House, which has stood next to Carrow Bridge since the 1920s, is earmarked for demolition.

The property was originally built for the bridgemaster, who was in charge of raising and lowering Carrow Bridge.

Last summer, Norfolk County Council asked for the city council to find alternative accommodation for tenant Reginald Dann, who had lived in the property for more than 50 years.

He has since left the property and the county council has applied to Norwich City Council for permission to demolish the home and a detached toilet block.

In documents lodged with City Hall, the county council’s property company NPS group says that the building is unsafe and it would be too costly to bring it back into use as a home.

They said: “Permission is sought for the dismantling/demolition of the existing house on the basis that the building is in great disrepair and has been subject to persistent break-ins/squatters, who have now removed parts of the building making it unsafe for use. There are also ongoing issues with environmental waste.

“The cost of rectifying these issues, and to bring the property back into a condition which would allow for it to be reused again for residential purposes is not economical.

“Although the loss of the existing dwelling is unfortunate, the dwelling, due to its design 
and construction is not 
considered to have any visual 
or landscape attributes to 
warrant its retention.”

The property is not nationally listed, or included on Norwich City Council’s local list, but does fall within the city centre conservation area. Carrow Bridge itself is locally listed.

The documents lodged with the city council state: “There are no proposals for the redevelopment of the site, although given the site’s conservation area status, the proposal is accompanied by a restoration plan which shows how the site is to be landscaped, thereby resulting in an overall improvement of the character and appearance of the area.”

Norwich City Council will 
make a decision on the demolition in due course.

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