A new push is being made to get a 30mph limit on a busy road - in a bid to pave the way for a mini roundabout at a notorious junction.

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At Cromer Town Council on Monday, members heard another plea from residents for more to be done to get a mini roundabout at the junction of the A148 and Felbrigg Road near Cromer.

Diana Meggy from Steps to Safety urged councillors to lobby Norfolk County Council, after hearing that the junction was not considered one of the top priorities for work.

Town, district and county councillor Hilary Thompson said: “You won’t get a mini roundabout anywhere, other than where there is a 30mph limit or lower.

“So we need to push to have the limit reduced from 40mph to 30mph. Anything over 30mph and there has to be a large roundabout, which none of us wants.”

She said the possible expansion of retail outlets on Holt Road in Cromer could improve the case for the limit, but said it was “not high on the agenda” of the county council.

Members voted to write to the county council to re-state their determination to extend the 30mph limit, and to push for a mini roundabout.

As reported in August, the junction is often clogged up by queues of traffic trying to turn into and out of the side road.

9 comments

  • The A148 has become steadily slower as the amount of cars have increased. The chances of actually reaching the signed speed limit, especially during peak times, along this road now is now very rare. If people are not able to handle the current speed limit then they clearly should not be driving!

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    Ben

    Wednesday, October 3, 2012

  • The A148 has become steadily slower as the amount of cars have increased. The chances of actually reaching the signed speed limit, especially during peak times, along this road now is now very rare. If people are not able to handle the current speed limit then they clearly should not be driving!

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    Ben

    Wednesday, October 3, 2012

  • Speed limit? Maybe. Roundabout? Waste of our council tax. They waste enough as it is, don't give them an excuse to waste more

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    weaversway

    Tuesday, October 2, 2012

  • Crunchy Dick, The Road Traffic Act allows the driver of an emergency vehicle to exceed the existing speed limit when responding to an emergency call by claiming an exemption. However, the Association of Chief Police Officers gave guidance that emergency vehicles should not exceed the existing speed limit by more than 20 mph when being used in an emergency. In the event that a driver has chosen to exceed the ACPO's advice the driver potentially may expose themselves in the event of an accident to a charge of dangerous driving. In addition to the ACPO's advice each emergency service issues its own guidance to its own drivers. The + 50% rule is currently recommended by one emergency service in Norfolk. These recommendations exist to protect the public and the driver and occupants of emergency vehicles alike.

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    Douglas McCoy

    Wednesday, October 3, 2012

  • I keep hearing about the need to reduce speed limits in towns and cities to 20mph but I wonder if the people who are making a case for this are aware of some of the negative implications? For instance, exemptions allowed for drivers of police, fire and ambulances vehicles allows for them to exceed the speed limit by 50% of the existing speed limit in an emergency where that is safely possible. That means across a city like Norwich the maximum speed for an emergency vehicle in a 30 mph area at the moment is 45 mph. Reduce the speed limit to 20mph and the maximum speed allowed for emergency vehicles would be 30 mph. It doesn't take Einstein to realise that that means a lot longer to wait for a police, fire or ambulance response if the vehicle is required to come from the other side of the city. In addition to this people like District Nurses, GP's and Midwives would simply be unable to see as many of the patients as they currently do in a normal shift. Without extra resources this means an additional wait or a potential reduction in service. Add into this situation things like commercial transport for things like mail, food etc and there inevitably will either be a need to increase the people employed to deliver things with its associated costs for everyone or acceptance of yet longer waiting times. Of course I'm sure there will be people who say its possible. No doubt it is with an injection of extra money and resources. However, where is that money going to come from in the current economic climate?

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    Douglas McCoy

    Tuesday, October 2, 2012

  • There should be a blanket speed limit introduced to all villages and towns of Norfolk, just as Suffolk did 10 years ago, no need to go fast through built up areas at all.

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    ingo wagenknecht

    Tuesday, October 2, 2012

  • Don't know where Douglas gets his facts from, but I'm afraid that he is wrong on the emergency services and the speed that they can travel at. They are not constrained by any limits, they just have to get to where they are going safely. How could you possibly enforce such a limit anyway. As for the speed limit on the Holt Road, for all the difference it will make to a lot of drivers, it might just as well be 5mph.

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    crunchy dick

    Tuesday, October 2, 2012

  • As the majority of accidents are rear end shunts at the junction, how would a lower speed limit or roundabout help???

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    Lord Elf

    Tuesday, October 2, 2012

  • I keep hearing about the need to reduce speed limits in towns and cities to 20mph but I wonder if the people who are making a case for this are aware of some of the negative implications? For instance, exemptions allowed for drivers of police, fire and ambulances vehicles allows for them to exceed the speed limit by 50% of the existing speed limit in an emergency where that is safely possible. That means across a city like Norwich the maximum speed for an emergency vehicle in a 30 mph area at the moment is 45 mph. Reduce the speed limit to 20mph and the maximum speed allowed for emergency vehicles would be 30 mph. It doesn't take Einstein to realise that that means a lot longer to wait for a police, fire or ambulance response if the vehicle is required to come from the other side of the city. In addition to this people like District Nurses, GP's and Midwives would simply be unable to see as many of the patients as they currently do in a normal shift. Without extra resources this means an additional wait or a potential reduction in service. Add into this situation things like commercial transport for things like mail, food etc and there inevitably will either be a need to increase the people employed to deliver things with its associated costs for everyone or acceptance of yet longer waiting times. Of course I'm sure there will be people who say its possible. No doubt it is with an injection of extra money and resources. However, where is that money going to come from in the current economic climate?

    Report this comment

    Douglas McCoy

    Tuesday, October 2, 2012

The views expressed in the above comments do not necessarily reflect the views of this site

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