A controversial application to site two wind turbines in a rural north Norfolk landscape has been granted by planners this morning.

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Landowner John McCleod said the pair, each measuring nearly 25m to blade tip, would provide enough electricity to power his East Ruston farming business.

Members of North Norfolk District Council’s development committee voted six-four, with one abstention, in favour of the plan for Old Manor Farm, Long Common.

Mr McCleod addressed the meeting and said the scheme would help guarantee the long-term sustainability of his farm, which employed five people, including two local youngsters.

Mr McCleod’s application attracted 96 supporting letters and 97 objections. Opponent Miss Cripps addressed the committee, painting a picture of a serene, rural landscape peppered with heritage assets including churches. The turbines, plus another already erected nearby, would spoil the views and would be visible from many village homes, she said.

Committee members heard that none of the statutory bodies consulted had any objections to the application.

Kerys Witton, the council’s landscape officer, said the scene was dominated by sweeping views to the coast but she believed the scale of the turbines, relative to other “vertical elements” within the landscape, was such that they would not make a significant impact.

4 comments

  • Sayitasitis: By Antis I mean those who have a very blinkered view and immediately go on the defensive as soon as something you disagree with is mentioned, every proposal, whatever the basis or idea, should be considered individually, not just dismissed out of hand, as you people do with wind turbine proposals, there are some that I would oppose based on proposed locations. For example I do not support the proposal for a solar farm at Coltishall, the area could be used for something far more beneficial. Solar panels are also not exactly pleasing to the eye, but work to some degree and have a place in the world for generation of power, as do wind turbines. We could probably discuss this issue until the cows came home and it is good to have a healthy debate, there will always be different views, whatever the discussion point, dare I mention the NDR?? Also, just to put the record straight, despite your assumptions, I do not support any football team, and having spent many years obtaining an engineering degree I do have a very small understanding of physics.

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    Mr T

    Friday, September 21, 2012

  • Mr. T, with due respect, you miss the point. Or rather two points. One, onshore wind turbines are appalling inificient. Two, all of us pay a large subsidy to landowners. That is their own use, to take the money from the majority an give it to landowners.

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    weaversway

    Friday, September 21, 2012

  • Success at last. All we have to do know is listen to the antis moaning. Good decision by the council.

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    Mr T

    Thursday, September 20, 2012

  • Mr T. By anti's I assume you mean those of us who actually have an understanding of the physics, electrical generation and the vagaries of wind flows? Or do you assume that like most of the pro's that we, like you, have little or no understanding of the subject but simply express pro opinions in roughly the same way as you would support a football team? These turbines will never generate any useable electricity for the UK as a whole, but they will generate considerable revenue for the farmer, from the subsidies you and I and all other pay on our utility bills. If you are happy with that, fine, you can rest assured that I am most definitely NOT!

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    windup

    Thursday, September 20, 2012

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