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Norfolk County Council rich list: Which firms got the most money this year?

PUBLISHED: 06:18 29 December 2017 | UPDATED: 16:01 29 December 2017

Parts of the NDR are finally open but the bill is much higher than expected. The road is being built by Balfour Beatty who got more money from the council than any other company this year. Picture: ANTONY KELLY

Parts of the NDR are finally open but the bill is much higher than expected. The road is being built by Balfour Beatty who got more money from the council than any other company this year. Picture: ANTONY KELLY

Archant Norfolk 2017

What has Norfolk County Council been doing with your hard-earned tax this year?

Some of the firms Norfolk County Council spends the most money with are for roadworks, school dinners and street lighting. Photo: Archant Some of the firms Norfolk County Council spends the most money with are for roadworks, school dinners and street lighting. Photo: Archant

We’ve taken a look at the council’s latest spending figures, which run from January to September this year, to see which firms got the most money from the council and why.

Tens of millions of pounds have been given to private companies and public sector groups to build roads, provide care homes and to recycle our waste.

Search the table below to find out which firms the council uses and how much money they have been paid.

1) Balfour Beatty - £46.9m

The NEWS recycling plant at Costessey. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY The NEWS recycling plant at Costessey. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY

This construction firm, which made a £12m profit in the first six months of this year, is building the Northern Distributor Road (NDR) near Norwich.

It was paid almost £47m from January to September by the council for constructing the road.

Costs of the NDR have ballooned and now stand at £205m but could rise even further. Balfour Beatty got almost twice as much money as any other supplier from January to September this year.

2) Norse Care - £25.4m

This council-owned firm is the largest care home provider in Norfolk. Norse Care was set up by the County Council in 2011 and is part of Norse Group. It has 20 care homes in Norfolk.

Profits at Norse Care more than doubled last financial year to almost £600,000. All of its care homes are rated as “good” by Care Quality Commission (CQC) inspectors apart from three which “require improvement” - Springdale in Brundall, Mayflower Court in Norwich and Lydia Eva Court in Gorleston.

3) Tarmac – £24.6m

Tarmac has a contract with Norfolk County Council to resurface roads and maintain the highways of the county. The 12-year contract could be worth up to £480m - £40m a year.

Two of the biggest firms used by the council provide care homes. Photo: Jonathan Brady/PA Wire Two of the biggest firms used by the council provide care homes. Photo: Jonathan Brady/PA Wire

4) Cambridgeshire Community Services - £12.3m

This NHS Trust was given the contract in Norfolk for a programme called ‘Healthy Child’. The scheme started in 2016 and is tasked with providing health services to schools and to all children of school age. Along with a drug treatment service and sexual health, the County Council spends tens of millions of pounds a year on public health. Director of Public Health Dr Louise Smith said: “They are our front line public health services providing health visitors, school nurses, contraception and sexual health clinics, and addiction specialists.”

5) Norse Eastern - £10.2m

Another firm owned by the council through the Norse Group, this money was paid to provide school dinners for the county’s children. It also has a contract to provide school food in Suffolk. It cooks over 25,000 primary school meals a day, according to its website.

6) FCC Recycling - £7.7m

FCC is owned by a Spanish firm and has a waste and recycling contract with the council. In the UK, FCC made a profit of £11.5m after tax in 2016.

Its four-year contract with Norfolk County Council began in 2016. Payments to FCC were made for providing three facilities where district councils deliver waste they collect, processing waste into fuel and arranging for the fuel to be exported. It also operates one recycling centre.

7) Independence Matters - £6.7m

This social enterprise care company was also set up by the council. It provides care for people with learning and physical disabilities, as well as the elderly. All of its services are rated as “good” by the CQC.

8) Norfolk and Suffolk NHS Foundation Trust (NSFT) - £6.6m

The NSFT is the region’s mental health trust and it had a contract with the Council to deliver drug and alcohol treatment services through something called the Norfolk Recovery Partnership. But in November this year that contract was given to a health and social care charity instead called Change, Grow, Live. It will start providing the service in April 2018.

9) Amey Lighting (Norfolk) - £6.25m

Amey has the contract with Norfolk County Council to maintain and install street lights. Amey Lighting (Norfolk) made a post-tax profit of £312,000 last year, up from £229,000 the year before. Amey has a 25-year contract to upgrade and maintain Norfolk’s street lights which started in 2008.

10) Norse Environmental Waste Services (NEWS) - £6.05m

This council-owned company, which is also part of the Norse Group, had a turnover of £15.3m for the year ending April 2017. In Norfolk it operates 19 recycling centres, provides three facilities where district councils can deliver the waste and transports that waste to processing or treatment facilities.

A spokesperson for the Council said: “These providers tendered for specific work with the council and were selected on the basis of cost, quality and specialist knowledge. Contractors play an important role in delivering our services to the people of Norfolk.”

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