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Is your MP for Brexit? Three MPs from Norfolk, Suffolk and the Fens want to leave

MP Richard Bacon is a lone voice so far among Norfolk MPs in wanting the UK to leave the European Union.

MP Richard Bacon is a lone voice so far among Norfolk MPs in wanting the UK to leave the European Union.

ARCHANT NORFOLK PHOTOGRAPHIC vÉÄövǬ© 2010

As the dust settles on the European Union referendum deal and a date of June 23 is declared, this is where our MPs stand on whether we should remain or leave.

Great Yarmouth, Brandon Lewis, Housing minister

Remain: “I fully support the PM. With our energy industry locally investing in, with (and from) countries across the EU our partnership is hugely important to the local economy and our national interest too.”

Norwich South, Clive Lewis

Remain: “Europe means millions of jobs and the only feasible way of getting solutions to the big transnational issues of our time such as climate change and international terrorism. Unlike the faceless footloose cooperations that without the EU would play nations off against each other in the race to the bottom, the EU is accountable to all of us.”

Broadland, Keith Simpson

Remain: “I have supported the Prime Minister on his aim which is to have a reformed EU. Certainly it would take a lot to persuade me that we would be better off out. Overall in the round we have been better off in the EU than out of it in terms of our economy and across our borders. On the whole business of wider security, although it is not about defence and security, there is a bit of overlap here. I rather think if Britain were to vote for us to withdraw, I have a suspicion that Mr Putin would be rubbing his hands with glee, this would mean a serious knock.”

South Norfolk, Richard Bacon

Leave: “I want to uphold and protect the historic rights of the people of this country to make our own laws, set our own taxes and control our own borders. It is now increasingly obvious that this cannot be done within the European Union, which has little interest in serious reform. I will therefore vote to leave”

North-West Norfolk Henry Bellingham

Leave: “I think the Prime Minister has done in many ways a great job and made significant progress. He has been brave and courageous and determined.

“But I was looking for an emergency brake on numbers coming in to the country and while he has got this emergency brake on tax credits, it is nothing like as strong as it might have been.

“The child benefits won’t kick in until 2020. I have to ask myself if this is really going to make a difference to the number of eastern Europeans coming here?”

South West Norfolk Elizabeth Truss, Environment secretary

Remain: “I am backing remain as I believe it is in Britain’s economic interest and means that we can focus on vital economic and social reform at home.”

Norwich North Chloe Smith

Remain: “The prime minister has worked hard and got a good deal. I strongly welcome that it ends ‘ever closer union’ and stops welfare abuse. I am sceptical of the EU but not convinced that there is any better practical option in leaving. Therefore, on balance I’m likely to vote ‘remain’. For me the principle of more jobs and trade for people in Norwich is very important. I also believe we benefit from shared crime and security mechanisms. As this is a referendum, every person’s view is equally important so I urge everyone to be informed and registered to vote.”

North Norfolk Norman Lamb

Remain: “I am frequently frustrated by the EU and will always argue the case for reform to make it more decentralised and more accountable, but when it comes to a decision about being in or out I am clear that we have to be in, making the case for reform rather than walking away.”

Mid-Norfolk George Freeman, Life sciences minister

Remain: “The British people voted to join a common market not a political union. The reform negotiated by the prime minister on UK membership of the single market, but not political union or eurozone and curbs on migrant benefit tourism, deliver that. Given the economic risks of Brexit I believe we are better off remaining in.”

Waveney Peter Aldous

Remain: “The settlement that the PM has secured protects the UK from further political integration and I believe that Britain will be stronger, safer and better off in a reformed EU.”

NE Cambs Stephen Barclay, Whip

Leave: “The deal does not deliver the game changer we need to protect against further EU integration.”

Suffolk Coastal Therese Coffey, Deputy leader of the House of Commons

Remain: “After a lot of consideration and drawing on my previous experience in business, in the EU referendum, I will be voting to remain.”

West Suffolk Matt Hancock, Cabinet office minister and paymaster general

Remain: “The decision on whether or not to remain part of the EU is one of the biggest decisions in a generation. I am delighted that we will deliver on our clear commitment and ensure the British people can exercise their sovereignty and take that decision in a referendum on 23 June.

“The economic case for membership is clear, and further strengthened by the reforms secured in the renegotiation. The verdict for jobs and prosperity is unambiguous: Britain is better off in a reformed Europe. In a turbulent and uncertain world we should not add to those risks to our economic security with years of uncertainty.

“The renegotiation ensures Britain is no longer part of a slide towards ever closer union. Our new “special status” means we will never join the euro, the free borders area, or be part of a European superstate, but will be able to trade freely with our biggest trading partner.

“I will campaign to remain in a reformed EU, and urge others to do the same.”

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78 comments

  • EU = ExpensiveUseless . We can't afford to continue pumping billions of pounds into this failed, corrupt, undemocratic institution. We receive little in return apart from an ongoing deluge of bureaucracy, red tape and unnecessary regulations which cause difficulties for small and medium sized businesses which provide employment for the vast majority of people in this country .These so called recent negotiations were a farce. Open borders are a serious danger to safety and security. We need to get out now, invest some of the money saved in our SMEs building and strong home market and also focus on the lucrative international trading opportunities with emerging and growing economies outside the EU. We need to concentrate on our own governance, reduce bureaucracy, protect all our citizens whilst maintaining our national identity and lifestyle. I have spent time in most of the EU countries over a number of years and seen first hand how this all malfunctions . Had we have adopted the Euro as our currency prior to the disastrous banking crisisrecession we would be in a far worse position. We need to get out now, onward and upwards.

    Report this comment

    Grey Fox

    Tuesday, February 23, 2016

  • @andy - I rather think you are missing the point of Mr Simpson's remark regarding Mr Putin. This is not a military issue so there is no need to bring up nato. Mr Putin would be very pleased because he is trying to hold on to as much influence in the countries he considers fall under the natural sphere of influence from Moscow. He would be very pleased to see the EU weakened as it strengthens his hand with his neighbours, notably Ukraine. I'm sure when you read his comments again you'll accept that your initial response was a little rash, erring on the hysterical.

    Report this comment

    Rushallchap3

    Monday, February 22, 2016

  • @steely - I think you are probably pretty representative old bean...but there are some who swear blind that there was no way to foresee the EU as it now is. I don't know if you've had a little peek at the 1975 no campaign leaflet, but from it it very clear that the current situation was foreseen and clearly spelt out. So my issue is with those people who abdicate their responsibility and the part they played in signing us up in the first place. Of course, over time, people's opinions may change and that is absolutely fine, it's only natural. But a fair few should recognise that when they voted in 1975 it was to improve their economic prospects. My charge is that now those same people have (and I'm sorry it's blunt) less to play for as their financial security is not dependant on their employment opportunities. For the first time ever we have more over 60's than under 18's. The political landscape is skewed and weighted towards this age group. It was this age group and their parents who got us into the EU. I think it's a little to late to whinge about it now and, frankly, it's a decision that should be left to those whom it will affect (or effect, I'm sure Patrick or el dingo will keep me right which one it is).

    Report this comment

    Rushallchap3

    Monday, February 22, 2016

  • Why don't these MP's represent their electorate ? Because there's undoubatably going to be a massive out vote, are they really that out of touch or are they pursuing a different agenda ?

    Report this comment

    John L Norton

    Monday, February 22, 2016

  • RushallOlympic - I was around in 1975 and, as you charmingly say, now 41 years closer to death. Hardly anyone I knew in their late teens or early twenties turned out to vote. The reason being we hadn't a clue what it was about. News bulletins in those days were only 5 minutes length. There were only two current affairs programmes which tended to give blanket coverage to Vietnam. That was another thing we couldn't understand. I was so stupid that the first time I could vote I did so for Harold Wilson. A man who did so much damage to this country that he was at one point suspected of working for the Soviets.

    Report this comment

    Steely Dan

    Monday, February 22, 2016

  • Get out ..... Clive Lewis is my MP and since been in power done nothing Mr Lewis don't become complacent look what happened to Charles Clarke

    Report this comment

    Norwich

    Monday, February 22, 2016

  • @Resident - tend to agree with you there (and I'm centre left). Some form of 'poll' tax is sensible - no local Representation with out some form of local Taxation (or contribution) - special cases allowed! Howls of mock protest expected!

    Report this comment

    Normal4Norfolk

    Monday, February 22, 2016

  • @Resident - tend to agree with you there (and I'm centre left). Some form of 'poll' tax is sensible - no local Representation with out some form of local Taxation (or contribution) - special cases allowed! Howls of mock protest expected!

    Report this comment

    Normal4Norfolk

    Monday, February 22, 2016

  • The Poll Tax was a very good idea and much more fair than the system we have today. In fact it would work far better today with far more over 18's living in one home. Help spread the burden. I would welcome the return of the Poll Tax. Just a really bad name.

    Report this comment

    Resident Smith

    Monday, February 22, 2016

  • @peter watson - I completely concur. For some reason many contributors on here seem incapable or unwilling to see the obvious comparison between the EU referendum and the recent referendum in Scotland. The British people are small c conservative and don't, in the main, care for making decisions that lead to uncertainty. There will be a lot of shouting, a few tears and precious little humour....but on the 24th of June we'll still be in the EU and we'll need to figure out a way to repair a few of the bridges we'll burn between now and the 23rd of June.

    Report this comment

    Rushallchap3

    Monday, February 22, 2016

  • Boris is obviously getting under Cameron`s skin. Cameron has done entirely the wrong thing today by having such a public go at Boris. He should have just ignore him and not mentioned him at all. If he is going to make the referendum such a major issue between him and Boris, all Cameron is going to do by constantly referring to Boris is to give the Out campaign publicity which they could never have dreamed of. Cameron is clearly rattled by Boris and by how much was on show for all to see today.

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    Hereandthere

    Monday, February 22, 2016

  • Status quo wins every time.The British people are inherently conservative and want their money safe.This is why Scotland remains in the union.People voted for the status quo because of the uncertainty and risk was to the currency.I understand the pound is wobbling already because of this one.A Brexit could lead to full-on run on the pound,leading to trebled mortgages and a collapse in the housing market.The threat of Brexit is already creating added uncertainty to financial markets already worried by the threat of another recession because of global factors.The status quo always wins.

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    Peter Watson

    Monday, February 22, 2016

  • @andy t - all uk laws are made by the British Parliament. There is no other way for a law to make it onto the statute books. Our commitments in the EU can lead to new legislation being proposed. But no one, or no one thing, can make our laws, we do that for ourselves. To suggest otherwise is disingenuous. The European Court of Justice (given the shorthand name of the European Supreme Court) like all courts only passes rulings, it does not and cannot make laws. If the UK wanted to regain supremacy of rulings we could simply, as I understand it repeal the 1972 European communities act, this would remove the ability of ministers to transpose EU texts into bills that are then passed into law and thereby return all delegated powers to the UK parliament. But what would this achieve? The vast majority of laws on the statute books are truly mundane and govern very specific issues, the majority of which we would simply be rewriting in order to maintain harmony and parity with our main trading partners.

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    Rushallchap3

    Monday, February 22, 2016

  • Lord elp us, its not up to those who want to stay to answer to the fears created by the out campaigns uncertainties. How can they possibly expect people to be scared about something they already take part in, make money from, holiday around in, and be largely satisfied with, weren't it for the likes of Nigel, telling everyone to get out and jump into what? deliberately stop a long standing relationship, cut off a large trading partner and economic security for what? About time the media starts asking the out campaign to explain in detail how they would provide enough GDP to cover our needs, without access to Scotland's wiski , gas and oil receipts, however low they might be at present. tell us in detail how you would subsidise farmers who can't compete on an unsubsidised basis. lets have no more of the personal attacks on people here, its our politicians you should question, why they want to reject a system that has kept the peace in Europe for over 60 years. CM'ON YOU OUTERS tell us what you want to replace the EU with, how many talks you have in the bag with countries who don't want us in the EU, because at present companies value Britain for its access to the EU markets, not for its rows or for sitting on the fence. To those who can't see that the City of London needs strict controls and regulations I say you are asking for the next bubble to burst, soon.

    Report this comment

    ingo wagenknecht

    Monday, February 22, 2016

  • @andy t - all uk laws are made by the British Parliament. There is no other way for a law to make it onto the statute books. Our commitments in the EU can lead to new legislation being proposed. But no one, or no one thing, can make our laws, we do that for ourselves. To suggest otherwise is disingenuous. The European Court of Justice (given the shorthand name of the European Supreme Court) like all courts only passes rulings, it does not and cannot make laws. If the UK wanted to regain supremacy of rulings we could simply, as I understand it repeal the 1972 European communities act, this would remove the ability of ministers to transpose EU texts into bills that are then passed into law and thereby return all delegated powers to the UK parliament. But what would this achieve? The vast majority of laws on the statute books are truly mundane and govern very specific issues, the majority of which we would simply be rewriting in order to maintain harmony and parity with our main trading partners.

    Report this comment

    Rushallchap3

    Monday, February 22, 2016

  • Surprise surprise Chloe looking after herself and siding with her boss! She was a wedger at school!

    Report this comment

    beverley

    Monday, February 22, 2016

  • Look at the former soviet union. Big and clumsy and eventually broke down into its component parts to function. Look at the good old US of A. A huge collection of states that have diffeent laws and is a basket case. It is rife with prejudice and whilst a huge financial powerhouse has some huge internal issues it just can't afford to address or won't address. Why is that the EU is the only monolith trying to keep growing. The bubble is nearing bursting point. Look at the PIGS. Portugal, Italy, Greece and Spain. Totally different financial models to Northern Europe but being shoe horned in because the "club" needs to grow!!!

    Report this comment

    Andy T

    Monday, February 22, 2016

  • reading through all the posts on here it looks very much like the EU is more unpopular than the dreaded poll tax . And look where the poll tax is at this very moment in time . HISTORY . And what happened to the woman who defended it to the very end?

    Report this comment

    motumroad

    Monday, February 22, 2016

  • reading through all the posts on here it looks very much like the EU is more unpopular than the dreaded poll tax . And look where the poll tax is at this very moment in time . HISTORY . And what happened to the woman who defended it to the very end?

    Report this comment

    motumroad

    Monday, February 22, 2016

  • There is so much scaremongering by those people who want us to stay in. Many of who also said it would be a disaster if we didn't join the Euro. The EU is a corrupt, bloated, chaotic institution, we should have the guts to leave and let the EU fester in it's own demise.

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    Lord 'Elp-Us

    Monday, February 22, 2016

  • @beverley. MP's don't vote per their constituents because they're not voting on their behalf. This is the old one man one vote. Irrespective of what party you are, you get to vote in or out. Everyone has their say. We survived in the world before joining Europe. The rest of the world offers us a much larger trading platform than Europe. We can trade with other countries without them dictating our legal system to us.

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    Andy T

    Monday, February 22, 2016

  • Hmmm.....career before country....eh Chloe?

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    One Horse Town

    Monday, February 22, 2016

  • Dear EDP, would it be possible to print the official campaign leaflets from the 1975 EEC referendum? If you did we could quash this often stated but never true notion that those who voted in 1975 did know that their decision would lead to the current EU. Notwithstanding the name change from EEC to EU the arc of progress was clear to see and clearly signalled by the 'no' campaign. The information can be found on the civitas web,site or alternative search online (on the most popular search engine) for '1975 no campaign leaflet'. Here are a few choice quotes, '..our right, by our votes, to change policies and laws in Britain will steadily dwindle. Unlike British laws, those of the Common Market - which will take precedence over our own laws - can only be changed if all the other members of the Common Market agree.' Or perhaps most tellingly 'The real aim of the Market is, of course, to become one single country in which Britain would be reduced to a mere province. The plan is to have a Common Market Parliament by 1978 or shortly thereafter. Laws would be passed by that Parliament which would be binding on our country. No parliament elected by the British people could change those laws'. Finally ' Unless you want to be ruled more and more by a Continental Parliament in which Britain would be a small minority, you should vote NO'. I've no problem with people having a view or changing their minds, but I think we should draw a line at allowing hypocrites to say that when they voted in 1975 it wasn't obvious what they were voting for. They really should admit that they voted yes in 1975 to improve their own prospects and that now they are 41 years nearer to death and the most productive parts of their working lives are behind them they now simply don't care about the future financial prospects of the generations which followed them. They are only concerned with ensuring that their pensions continue to roll in and to hell with the rest of us.

    Report this comment

    Rushallchap3

    Monday, February 22, 2016

  • The EU is more corrupt than FIFA - why should we continue to prop it up.

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    Steely Dan

    Monday, February 22, 2016

  • Bruce - How do you think it will be cheaper ? Facts ? - Elsewhere the calculation (Norway model) was it would cost a similar amount for 'free trade' with EU (94%). No simple get outs please. Oh yes the USA stated in the autumn it had little interest in trade deal direct with non EU UK. Oh you say - It will all right in the end - they'll have to agree....Go bet your house on it!

    Report this comment

    Normal4Norfolk

    Monday, February 22, 2016

  • It will just be another horrible farce all based around issues that do not affect 99.99% of the UK public but are highly emotive. As you can predictably see from 80% of the posts below. Is your lifestyle really affected by the issues as much as you think? Probably not. The cost to leave will be far far higher in more ways than one.

    Report this comment

    Resident Smith

    Monday, February 22, 2016

  • What will it cost? Nowhere near as much as the 350 million pounds per week we are currently paying. We can all afford a turkey for christmas if we stop having to pay that.

    Report this comment

    Bruce87

    Monday, February 22, 2016

  • The UK can not afford to leave the European super state. Apart from anything else non tariff barriers would be erected by the EU member states, credit to non EU nations would not be provided for them to buy UK exports, the UK can not provide export guarantees of finances to sell into the global market, and without non-EU skills the UK simply couldn't meet its own needs or the needs to export goods. Then there's the matter of the UK economy. It's totally domestic service sector orientated. The majority of exports presently made are invisible exports, and these would dissappear in an instance following even the announcement of a Britexit from the referendum let alone actual exit. And tthere is so very much more. The UK is now totally dependent on EU membership like it or not. Much better would be to reform the British government and change from the ludicrous monarchy to become a Republic. The root and branch change needed is not EU membership, it's root and branch change of Britain to align with Europe.

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    koenig

    Monday, February 22, 2016

  • Turkeys and Christmas comes to mind - Looks like in was right to get out of the pound months ago! Scare stories ... no - we just want some numbers on the reality of exit - what will it cost? We know what the EU costs. Doesn't seem too much to ask. All the numbers we do see on an exit are not very pleasant - 20% drop in sterling etc.

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    Normal4Norfolk

    Monday, February 22, 2016

  • Hang on a bit before I go, everybody's favourite mate, Michael "Slippery Snake" Gove has joined the out campaign. They are soon going to have the 10 most objectionable men in the UK.I am with Green Ink, getting worried about agreeing with Ingo, Nicola McLenin and Clive Lewis.

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    francophile

    Monday, February 22, 2016

  • Take the rest of the month off John.....all of you.

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    Larson Whipsnade

    Monday, February 22, 2016

  • Here we go the Out campaigners led by George Galloway(sic),One Trick Pony ,Farrage and Boris, and IDS, Tory Leader failed and we are worried about the looney Left.Bored already, wake me up in June if I am back from France.Bit nippy out here could do with another Winter Fuel Allowance and an OAP rise. I will leave it to Larson to fight for the cause.

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    francophile

    Monday, February 22, 2016

  • Here we go the Out campaigners led by George Galloway(sic),One Trick Pony ,Farrage and Boris, and IDS, Tory Leader failed and we are worried about the looney Left.Bored already, wake me up in June if I am back from France.Bit nippy out here could do with another Winter Fuel Allowance and an OAP rise. I will leave it to Larson to fight for the cause.

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    francophile

    Monday, February 22, 2016

  • Cameron went to the EU to negotiate for peanuts and only came back with the husks.

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    Sherbert

    Monday, February 22, 2016

  • Cameron went to the EU to negotiate for peanuts and only came back with the husks.

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    Sherbert

    Monday, February 22, 2016

  • I watched Cameron being questioned by Andrew Marr. Evasion, scare stories and just not telling the truth predominated. Has Marr ever given anyone an easier time. Where is Paxman when we need him most? Question, why do those on the left always throw insults at their opponents?

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    andy

    Monday, February 22, 2016

  • Sorry Ingo, but as Mandy Rice Davies said... Johnson is not a little Englander by anyone's stretch of imagination, his political career will not be affected by being on one side or the other because his case is that the EU is failing and not what it should be. Nor when it comes down to it can the insult of Little Englander be applied to most of us in this country which exports to and works with a great many nations. It is a distraction to belittle valid concerns about how the EU is run and for whose benefit and whether the claims made for the EU as a power are of any merit. I believe the EU is a distraction to good government of the UK.

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    Daisy Roots

    Monday, February 22, 2016

  • Cameron is spouting alot of rubbish because he 's not happy about us leaving the eu on his watch! OUT ALL THE WAY FOR ME ! And i look forward to reading what Boris Johnson writes on the subject. T7..........Gone Fishing!

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    Tenchman7

    Monday, February 22, 2016

  • hat off to the fence sitters who have changed their mind in the last 24 hrs. since Boris declared his little Englander status. This is the man who likes to be mayor of a large Metropolitan area and become PM, he was never a EU supporter, it was too complicated for him to bother. The BBC and its flag ship outers Laura Kuensberg and Nick Robinson will now ensure that by the time the ref. vote is due the over exposure and coverage of the same old sad political parties faces will have turned off voters sufficiently that they have decided to go on holiday instead. Postal votes up and down the black country will be delivered in large bags by tribal elders and family heads, as usual, OAPs will be encouraged to vote by post and the 250k who 'forget it all' in Glastonbury will not have bothered to register their votes. Students are another blinkered part of society pressed into university life and unable to think straight, they have been disenfranchised, some 80.000 young people have been erased from the voting registers. I can't see that the BBC would encourage young people to register, they don't want us to. So the farce has been set, raise the curtain.

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    ingo wagenknecht

    Monday, February 22, 2016

  • Brandon Lewis -Agnew and Cameron lapdog of course he is going to toe the line. But his statement-not heard of Norway ? Not heard of how Yarmouth companies like Gardline work all over the world ? Too much of the EU is accountable to no one, too much policy making and too many decisions are not accountable to us as voters via our Euro MPs . As for Cameron saying we would not have any greater self determination or sovereignty outside the EU-what a pathetic excuse for a Prime Minister and a government to admit they are incapable of doing what is best or what UK voters want. I voted to join a free market not a Federal state run by Germany and France propped up by small nations chewing on the bones cast to them-bones we as tax payers are funding. The argument that leaving is retrograde and insular is absurd-we trade and work with every nation in the world, we will still be Europeans.

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    Daisy Roots

    Monday, February 22, 2016

  • We all knew way Chloe Smith would vote, she has never voted any other way that pander to Cameron in order to keep her position, well this could now backfire on these people as Cameron is almost sure to lose his position as the blonde buffoon will take over the Tory leadership once we have left the EU.

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    John L Norton

    Monday, February 22, 2016

  • make britain great again . VOTE OUT

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    brexitnow

    Monday, February 22, 2016

  • No non elected E.U. Commission telling us what to do ! for this reason alone, amongst so many others,Vote OUT !!

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    Albert Cooper

    Monday, February 22, 2016

  • boris summed it up when he said the EU was undemocratic and totally out of control .The purpose of the EU was for trade only . British people never voted for the EU as it stands in its present form

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    brexitnow

    Monday, February 22, 2016

  • I'm sure that Boris has decided to go for the "out" campaign purely for the good of the country. He wouldn't do something just to advance his own career would he?

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    PaulWho

    Monday, February 22, 2016

  • Jack, there will be a change in PM long before then. Depends who wins! Probably no more than a two horse race at the moment. May has probably just ruled herself out.

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    andy

    Sunday, February 21, 2016

  • Shame so many MPs lack confidence in parliament's ability to govern us and the government's ability to lead us into a successful, prosperous alliance with the EU once we've left. If we do vote Leave, we can look forward to some interesting candidate re-selections by Conservative Associations before the next election.

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    Jack1956

    Sunday, February 21, 2016

  • CaMoron is just a snake oil salesman who's already broken more promises than he's kept. NOT A MAN TO BE TRUSTED. I'm voting LEAVE

    Report this comment

    Rotciv

    Sunday, February 21, 2016

  • Watching Cameron squashing Andrew Marr on tv. Who on earth would buy a used car of him. Evasive, scare mongering and absolutely useless. He is dreadful and not to be trusted. Even if, and I hope we do, we vote to leave he has made it clear he will then try to negotiate some sort of deal rather than us just get out. Trying to pretend that the EU will block us is nonsense - they need our trade too and if we stopped sending benefits to eastern european countries it would have a very big negative effect on those countries.

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    andy

    Sunday, February 21, 2016

  • It's almost worth voting leave if Scotland will declare independence at that result. But then Leave leaves us wide open for TTIP.... Be careful what you wish for.

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    EasternPromise

    Sunday, February 21, 2016

  • So all or most all East Anglian MP's are quite content to cede UK power to a Federalist Brussels. Iceland, Norway, Litchenstein and Switzerland are not in the EU but they do have complete access to the EU free trade market and this is what we want. The EU is a bureaucratic unworkable mess and we should leave it while we still can.

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    Radshenko

    Sunday, February 21, 2016

  • Get Out. Let us stand on our own two feet once again and put the Great back into Britain.

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    john131

    Saturday, February 20, 2016

  • Get out ..... The EU will in time bring this country down , we put more in than we get out , our biggest trade deals are with China ( I believe is not in the EU) and most countries will still trade with us if we leave anyway , it's down to money

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    Norwich

    Saturday, February 20, 2016

  • Just read Simpson's comments. So he is trying to imply we are at risk from Russia if we leave. What utter rubbush! Has he never heard of NATO?

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    andy

    Saturday, February 20, 2016

  • Why do the remain group always try to put out unsubstantiated scare stories? Their leaps in non- logic is outstanding. Their stories about security and peace is bunkem. NATO ensured there has been peace in Europe and has been effective long before the EU had any influence. To say 3m jobs are at risk is daft - the EU has far jobs dependent on trade with the UK and just look at their unemployment record! We are at more security risk as part of the EU because we have little control of our borders. If Germany gives its 1.1m immigrants for 2015 citizen rights, many could come here. How can that be good for our security or anything else? Vote out!

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    andy

    Saturday, February 20, 2016

  • The Leave campaign is asking us to take a Quantum leap in the dark.There are significant risks involved,like a house price collapse if the pound were to collapse by 20% as Goldman Sachs has predicted.Voters must take into account the many risks of leaving,not least to the union as Scotland would go for indpendence.The sovereignty argument is pure hokum.We have subsidiarity with the US as a member of NATO,The UN and with international law.Are we going to seek to leave those as well?

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    Peter Watson

    Saturday, February 20, 2016

  • comment provided 18.45 Saturday.

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    ingo wagenknecht

    Saturday, February 20, 2016

  • Those who want to leave and say that they are doing this for voters are liars. These changes are never done for human rights or voters right to decide, they have an unfair disproportional vote, they are being toyed with. Richard Bacon is an ardent proponent of the devils sporn TTIP and if he thinks that Governments will have any clout against multinational corporations with armies of lawyers behind them, then he's dafter than I thought. George Freeman, our science supremo always eager to support companies flogging GM aberrations, knows how many hundreds of millions science has received from the EU, so his fencepost is lodged fair and square in his backside, he has not made his mind up and will waver with whoever guarantees him a job. I say don't vote at all, both campaigns are utterly bonkers and have not got sovereignty, voters, or any democratic notion in mind, these people are dealing in our futures, increasing the rich poor gap as they go along. Some of these campaigners could have had a place in Hitler's cabinet, they are more right wing than his ministers.

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    ingo wagenknecht

    Saturday, February 20, 2016

  • On reflection Labour may well prevaricate over the subject of tv debates and only agree to them happening after May`s elections. To have Corbyn on the same stage as Cameron will play out very badly for Labour and would further damage their prospects in the local elections.

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    Hereandthere

    Saturday, February 20, 2016

  • we want our country back . VOTE OUT

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    votebritainout

    Saturday, February 20, 2016

  • Let's get out .....why let the EU tell us how to lead our lives?

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    dave123

    Saturday, February 20, 2016

  • MPs should vote in accordance with their constituents' wishes not along party lines or their own feelings. More lies to come undoubtedly.

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    beverley

    Saturday, February 20, 2016

  • Just saw Camerons statement on the news! All he said was scare stories and nothing positive - is that really the best he can do? All the negatives lacked substance. Lets leave now.

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    andy

    Saturday, February 20, 2016

  • cheap labour from europe and outside europe is not cheap if you take into account billions paid in benefit top ups . If cameron had got the deal he promised us at the election he might have been in with half a chance . But this deal is a joke . EU leaders must have had a big party after cameron left to celebrate this shoddy deal they have now given the uk

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    alfredsmith177

    Saturday, February 20, 2016

  • Lewis says, " the EU is accountable to all of us." Since when. It is an unaccountable organization run by bureaucrats whose finances do not stand up to scrutiny. This deal will unravel rather spectacularly in the next week or so, once we start getting down to the minutia of it. Those people who have long held a settled view are unlikely to change the way they are going to vote. Boris and an unforeseen event in Europe, between now and the referendum, will have more of an effect on the outcome than Cameron`s non agreement. Pressure will now be on for televised debates. Cameron in my view cannot duck them this time round. Corbyn however might find it all, "a beam me up Scotty moment," as he has been a euro-sceptic all his political career. But since the start of the year has now down a complete U turn and fully supports remaining in the EU. And to think Corbyn used to be such a principled individual.

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    Hereandthere

    Saturday, February 20, 2016

  • I think we should definitely vote to leave. The "agreement" means nothing as it has not become part of the treaty until the EU meets again. This means they can all change their minds and reject it at a later date.

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    Peter Evetts

    Saturday, February 20, 2016

  • OUT, OUT, OUT. Lets take back control of our borders and stop mass migration from mainly poorer eastern European countries and in four years when Turkey joins the EU even more economic migration. Let our own parliament decided on the laws for this country and stop sending massive amounts of money to this European parliament which we get back less than 50%. Why are we listening to our second rate salesman David Cameron with his deal, he has not followed through on any of his manifesto pledges so far, can we actually trust what this man says, let us leave EU.

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    GreyMan

    Saturday, February 20, 2016

  • I vote out, this so called deal is not a deal at all just a waste of time..

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    norfolkboyo

    Saturday, February 20, 2016

  • i shouldn't think my MP is standing . He is probably rolling on the floor laughing at this disgraceful deal

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    billy smith

    Saturday, February 20, 2016

  • Could not agree more, has she ever voted against the Government?

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    Cannot Say

    Saturday, February 20, 2016

  • Blimey, C.Lew(l)is has made a statement I with which I agree.

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    Green Ink from Tunbridge Wells

    Saturday, February 20, 2016

  • Blimey, C.Lew(l)is has made a statement I with which I agree.

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    Green Ink from Tunbridge Wells

    Saturday, February 20, 2016

  • Irrelevant what MPs think. We decide this. Shame on Labour though for backing a EU that promotes privatisation, deregulation and neo-liberalism. Expected better of them...

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    marty r

    Saturday, February 20, 2016

  • Out - let's rough it with e.g Norway and Switzerland rather than luxuriate with Spain, Portugal and Italy.

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    F G HOB

    Saturday, February 20, 2016

  • We will still not have autonomous control over our borders. Under this deal 55% of EU member state have to agree to let us do what we want to do. We will still be paying child allowance at full rate for existing EU workers already here until 2020 and we can't stop other benefits being paid to any of them from the moment they enter our country as was promised in the Tory election manifesto. Besides, none of this will be immediately enshrined in EU law as it requires a treaty change.

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    Mr. Grouchy

    Saturday, February 20, 2016

  • I know where Chloe Smith will stand.... right next to Cameron as she has never done anything else.

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    John L Norton

    Saturday, February 20, 2016

  • can we trust either our government or the e u to stand by any agreement that may have been made? personally i would not.

    Report this comment

    ted

    Saturday, February 20, 2016

  • sidjones811

    Saturday, February 20, 2016

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