A handful of MPs have said they will shun a proposed pay rise after the 2015 election and give the extra taxpayer cash to charity.

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Norwich North MP Chloe Smith, Mid Norfolk MP George Freeman, Norwich South MP Simon Wright and Waveney MP Peter Aldous all said they would give the extra £7,600 to good causes, if proposals were approved.

But Broadland MP Keith Simpson and Bury St Edmunds MP David Ruffley said the salary hike would be largely offset by pension and allowance changes, and might not leave MPs much better off.

Mr Simpson said: “Ipsa [Independent Parliamentary Standards Authority] has come up with a proposal which talks about increasing MPs’ salary, but at the same time increasing their contribution towards pensions and to look at the whole allowances to do with food and accommodation, and everything. I, for one, want to look at that in the round.”

South West Norfolk MP Elizabeth Truss said she would have to consider the final proposal and the full implications before she made any decisions about whether she would take a pay rise, adding: “It is right MPs do not decide their own salary. That is why Ipsa was established to conduct a thorough review of pay and conditions.”

Downing Street has declined to say if prime minister David Cameron will accept an 11pc pay rise expected to be recommended by the MPs’ independent standards watchdog.

North Norfolk MP Norman Lamb, did not indicate if he would take the pay rise.

But he said; “In the wake of the expenses scandal, people’s trust in politicians was rightly damaged. Parliament created a new independent body, the IPSA, which would make decisions about MPs’ pay and expenses. Control was taken away from MPs – we don’t vote on our salaries and rightly so.

“However, I would urge IPSA to recognise that you simply can’t justify a substantial pay increase, even if offset by cuts in pension and other allowances, in the current economic climate. So many people have had a tough time since the crash in 2008. In my view, we should be treated in exactly the same way as other public sector workers.”

Mr Freeman said: “I will give any increase in remuneration from Ipsa to charity until we have a proper review of MPs’ roles and cost of parliament.”

Waveney MP Peter Aldous said if he was re-elected and the proposals were approved he would set up a “locality budget” – similar to one run by Suffolk county councillors.

“I’d make donations to charitable and other appropriate causes in the constituency, details of which would be available for scrutiny on my website,” he said.

Bury St Edmunds MP David Ruffley acknowledged a salary increase was “highly controversial” when average real take-home pay has taken a hit since the 2008 crash.

Ms Smith said: “My personal view is that the salary measure that the body is proposing is wrong. It is a real slap in the face for people who haven’t had a real rise in a long while. I don’t want it.

“I already give to charity wherever possible and I will do more, with this.”

Great Yarmouth MP Brandon Lewis said; “I haven’t seen the full details. I think it would be a mistake though when we are making all the changes in the public sector. It is just not credible.”

He said he could see the argument that there would be charities that would be better beneficiaries.

11 comments

  • Parasites.

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    Greg F

    Wednesday, December 11, 2013

  • Who brought IPSA into being and who authorised them to carry out their MP salary raising exercise? Yes, that's right. The pious gruntings from the House of Commons that they will not take the raise cuts no ice at all. They do this every single time this ridiculous salary rise dance happens. Look back at the reports the last time and you will see the serious faces of the MPs making their solemn promises. They've all taken the rise because they think we've forgotten about it. There is also the serious problem of treating. Making a promise to your electorate that you will personally make the constituency richer by donating monies could be an offence under Electoral Commission rules.

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    alecto

    Wednesday, December 11, 2013

  • The public might have some more sympathy for MPs if they stopped their directorships and second jobs e.g. clowning around in Australian jungles.One Tory MP manages to work full-time as a lawyer as well.Somehow they need to get the message they are there for us.If they get their payrise the least the public can demand is that they all go full-time.

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    Peter Watson

    Tuesday, December 10, 2013

  • My heart bleeds for my MP Keith Simpson. In the last 2 years, he has allowed my pension contributions to rise by almost 3% while allowing no pay rise for 3 years and now my salary is having to drop by over £1000. So when he says he will have to look at it in the round against his other expenses perhaps he should think about all the Public Sector employees who make up his constituents who have been forced to make cuts and have to work out if they can afford to eat. I have written to him on occasions and all I get is a generic reply from his office. Clearly he does not deserve to be an MP as he will not communicate with those that he represents.

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    Drayton Resident

    Tuesday, December 10, 2013

  • Typical Lib Dem just sit on the fence !

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    Jerry

    Tuesday, December 10, 2013

  • My heart bleeds for these charlatans, it really does.

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    Old Long Balls

    Tuesday, December 10, 2013

  • This false piety does not work for us at all. Fact is that IPSA was given the powers to allocate them more money and they can refuse it and give it away, but it will still go though their accounts and we still have to pay for it. Outrageous when public sector pay rises are still frozen, limited to 1% or the rate of inflation. People are working in the public sector on zero hour contracts and many hundreds of thousands had to sign new contracts and gree to cuts in wages. Bankers are still on 10% pay rise per annum and bonuses are not curtailed. Inequality is rising and some Tories are talking of bringing back workhouses for young people. AQll these party politicians have swecond and third jobs, directorships and remunerations from their outside interests, still they are using their connections to garner favours for themselves and nothing has changed much. Many people are hurting and Osborne's electioneering attempt last week was derisable, he could do much for millionaires, but he has no message for the future generations!

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    ingo wagenknecht

    Tuesday, December 10, 2013

  • What, no quote from Norman?

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    Jeffrey Osborne

    Tuesday, December 10, 2013

  • The pay rise is just part of a raft of changes - the overall effect is that given the reduction in pension contributions combined with restrictions of expenses most will not be better off , some will actually be worse off. Also the rediculous 'golden goodbye' or relocation payments of £33,000 when an MP loses his seat will cease.

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    Tudor Bushe

    Tuesday, December 10, 2013

  • The motivation of those people who have chosen a political career is always questionable. Many politicians appear to have entered politics for no other reason other than the need to satisfy their own ego's or simply for the pursuit of power rather than be of service to their electorate. As a government the coalition have pursued a rigorous and unpopular financial policy of enforced austerity on the majority of the population with the rationale that pay restraint and cuts to benefits are essential and for the national good. Regrettably, the national good doesn't appear to apply to bankers, chief executives and now politicians who appear to think that they should be exempt from sharing the economic hardship that is affecting the rest of the country. To suggest that any of them are genuinely concerned about the people they are supposed to represent is stretching credulity to the extreme.

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    Bad Form

    Friday, December 13, 2013

  • What other job could you walk into and in many cases with no previous experience in get paid £66,396 plus perks. That's far too much for a nodding donkey in my opinion.

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    John L Norton

    Tuesday, December 10, 2013

The views expressed in the above comments do not necessarily reflect the views of this site

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