Think again before allowing 37,000 new homes to be built in and around Norwich - that’s the message to council leaders from almost 30 organisations worried housing could ruin the areas’ character.

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An alliance made up of ,ore than a dozen parish councils and campaign groups have sent letter to key figures at local councils urging them to scrap the housing targets.

Under a planning blueprint, known as the Joint Core Strategy, the Greater Norwich Development Partnership, made up of Norwich City Council, Broadland District Council. South Norfolk Council and Norfolk County Council, have outlined where homes ought to be built up to 2026.

A legal challenge against that plan led to a high court judge last year telling the councils they had not demonstrated why an area to the north east of Norwich had been chosen for up to 10,000 homes, ahead of alternative sites.

The strategy is about to be resubmitted to an inspector, with officers having reached the same conclusion as before over where the homes should be.

But campaigners argue the world has changed since then and, with the economic climate slowing housebuilding to a snail’s pace, the targets should be reviewed.

That alliance of campaigner is spearheaded by the Campaign to Protect Rural England, and includes parish councils such as Hethersett, Rackheath, Great and Little Plumstead and Salhouse.

David Hook, CPRE Norfolk’s alliance spokesman said: “CPRE Norfolk has consistently called for a reduction in local housing targets because the 37,000 new houses planned for the GNDP area threaten our core objectives of protecting and enhancing the rural environment.

“The high level of development envisaged, much of it on greenfield sites, will lead to a severe erosion of the features that make the countryside surrounding Norwich so special.

“Rural areas will be suburbanised and tranquility will diminish as population density, traffic congestion, light and noise pollution increase.”

However, Andrew Proctor, leader of Broadland District Council and former chairman of the GNDP, said the housing targets were still valid.

He said: “It’s worth pointing out that the judge did not say the housing figures had to be changed following the legal challenge. The census showed our population is increasing and we are planning up to 2026, so it’s not unreasonable to plan for a similar increase. I don’t think there’s anything wrong with the figures.”

20 comments

  • Not in my backyard comes to mind!

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    BG

    Tuesday, January 29, 2013

  • MickB1 - NIMBY is a term used by people that live in council houses, rented accomodation or not from that area. Any person of right mind would not want a developement of this size in their backyard. When you purchase a property you can choose to live in a city, suberb or rural area but what you do not choose is that after years of saving to buy a property in a rural area that area is then ruined forever and engulfed in urban sprawl - And YES I do own my own home! I would like to know since when all the land between Rackheath, Salhouse and Spixworth became the built up area on the outskirts of Norwich as you refer to it because the last time I looked (this morning) it was open green space and farm land which will be lost forever if this developement goes ahead!

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    The Golden One

    Tuesday, January 29, 2013

  • Unless the jobs market can support these homes then they wont get sold. Where are these 74,000 people (two workers per house seems fair) lurking at the moment? People wont buy houses that they cannot pay for or rent them for that matter. And if there are 74,000 spare jobs knocking round Norwich at the moment then I am the Queen of Sheba. This is the problem with putting numpties in charge of councils. Sooner we get rid of this lot and get councillors with brains in charge the better.

    Report this comment

    Electra

    Tuesday, January 29, 2013

  • 13 = 1 third ;-)

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    The Golden One

    Tuesday, January 29, 2013

  • Look here, they're in the wrong place, at the wrong time, and the right landowners are not going to benefit.

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    Mr Cameron Isaliar

    Tuesday, January 29, 2013

  • Wooo "The Golden One" Hit A Raw Nerve have we...!

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    MickB1

    Tuesday, January 29, 2013

  • What Rubbish. Our core objectives of protecting and enhancing the rural environment. Protecting the value of their homes more like..!

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    MickB1

    Tuesday, January 29, 2013

  • All of those who have commented should look at the SNUB campaign website where we have been fighting this for years. Have a look see at www.snubcampaign.com

    Report this comment

    SNUB

    Tuesday, January 29, 2013

  • With up to 3 million poor people expected to move to Britain from the two former failed communist Balkan blocs, one can only agree that these homes should be built, given the choice of shanty towns could be springing up around the Norwich area, one can only go for 37,000 homes option for housing some ofl these poor people.

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    nrg

    Tuesday, January 29, 2013

  • That "BG" must either be a council tenant or in rented accommodation!!

    Report this comment

    The Golden One

    Tuesday, January 29, 2013

  • If they can't sell them, the builders won't build them. These numbers mean nothing in the present situation.

    Report this comment

    JCW

    Tuesday, January 29, 2013

  • MickB1 - NIMBY is a term used by people who live in coucil houses, rented accomodation or don't live in that area. Anyone in their right mind that owns their own house would not want a developement of this size in their back yard and YES I do own my own home! People that own their home can choose to purchase a property in either the city, suberbs or a rural area but once you've purchase the property, that you've saved years for, in a rural area you don't then expect that area to be swallowed up in urban sprawl and since when has land between Rackheath, Salhouse and Spixworth become the outskirts of Norwich as you say - It is open green space and farm land which will be lost forever if this developement goes ahead!!

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    The Golden One

    Tuesday, January 29, 2013

  • Has anything been published around the amount of empty homes we currently have and what the plan is to put residents in these? I know there was a scheme running that was looking into this but there must be a loop hole in this process. An example of this is a home in Dereham, just as you go over the railway bridge approaching from Swanton Morley, there has been for years a totally deserted house all over grown with quite a sizeable piece of land attached that no doubt if they knocked it down, would make room for several new build homes. The other thing with new builds is that they are so squashed in, how are we actually going to make people want to buy these homes when they are like shoe boxes!

    Report this comment

    kathadams

    Tuesday, January 29, 2013

  • Unless the jobs market can support these homes then they wont get sold. Where are these 74,000 people (two workers per house seems fair) lurking at the moment? People wont buy houses that they cannot pay for or rent them for that matter. And if there are 74,000 spare jobs knocking round Norwich at the moment then I am the Queen of Sheba. This is the problem with putting numpties in charge of councils. Sooner we get rid of this lot and get councillors with brains in charge the better.

    Report this comment

    Electra

    Tuesday, January 29, 2013

  • It's easy to see why this area was chosen, you simply have to look at a map. It's an open piece of land that sits between Norwich and Spixworth, Rackheath and Plumstead and looks like it needs filling in. My friends that simple is not a good enough reason, is it?

    Report this comment

    Unemployed and Luvin it.

    Tuesday, January 29, 2013

  • Sorry Norwich If they want to build them they will! The people of Thetford have been desperately fighting Breckland councils plans to impose 5,000 extra houses on the town. This is almost certain to go ahead in spite of the many reasonable concerns raised about this large scale development on the edge of the town.

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    caroline jacobs

    Tuesday, January 29, 2013

  • "It’s worth pointing out that the judge did not say the housing figures had to be changed following the legal challenge." Has Cllr Proctor learnt nothing about judical review challenges? The job of the judge was simply to review the process adopted in arriving at the housing figures, not to review the figures themselves. Surely the man at the top should be better informed.

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    Nemesis

    Tuesday, January 29, 2013

  • @The Golden One I think you must be one of these NIMBY'S Why shoundn't they bulid these houses on the outskirts of Norwich it's already a bulit up area. Are you in a Council house "The Golden One"

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    MickB1

    Tuesday, January 29, 2013

  • There are 12,440 empty homes in Norfolk. Any plans to utilise these first before building new ones? 450 are councilhousing assoc owned. www.emptyhomesuk.co.uk

    Report this comment

    emptyproperty

    Thursday, January 31, 2013

  • My issue is that Norfolk is a large county so why just choose one very small area to dump 13 of these houses and totally change the dynamics of that area forever!!! What makes more sense is that these houses (if really needed and I doubt that) could evenly be dispersed throughout Norfolk and then money could also evenly be dispersed throughout Norfolk to improve the existing infrastructure (i.e. schools etc) and provide a much needed boost to lots of villages and towns across the county instead of just a select few which would be ruined and turned into suberbs of Norwich city.

    Report this comment

    The Golden One

    Tuesday, January 29, 2013

The views expressed in the above comments do not necessarily reflect the views of this site

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