A reassessment of where thousands of homes should be built in and around Norwich over the next 15 years has concluded the north east of the city is still the best spot for up to 10,000 houses.

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Following a legal challenge, council officers were forced to look again at the joint core strategy – a blueprint for where 37,000 homes could be built in Norwich, parts of Broadland and parts of South Norfolk – between now and 2026.

A judicial review obtained by Salhouse campaigner Stephen Heard saw Mr Justice Ouseley rule that the councils behind the blueprint had not demonstrated why an area to the north east of Norwich was picked for up to 10,000 homes, ahead of alternative locations.

He told the councils, which make up the Greater Norwich Development Partnership (GNDP), to reassess the north-east growth triangle – which includes Rackheath, Old Catton, Spixworth and Thorpe St Andrew.

A report being considered by the GNDP board tomorrow shows how independent consultants URS have re-examined the ‘north-east growth triangle’ and considered any ‘reasonable alternatives’ to it.

Eighteen options within the Norwich policy area were initially considered, but the number was taken down to three, which will be put before councillors tomorrow.

The GNDP says all three have gone through a sustainability appraisal, being judged against a range of environmental, economic and social criteria.

One option would limit development to inside the route of the planned northern distributor road around Norwich, while another would disperse 2,400 of the new homes around the north west and north east of Broadland, with a further 4,600 being built in Hethersett and Cringleford in South Norfolk rather than in Broadland.

But the report recommends that the north east growth triangle should remain the most appropriate option for the homes.

Andrew Proctor, GNDP chairman and leader of Broadland District Council, said: “The recommendation that the north east growth triangle is the most appropriate has been thoroughly tested and checked at every turn in the spirit of the court’s ruling.

“If the recommendation is agreed this week and eventually by the partnership constituent councils, we hope that this will end the period of uncertainty and provide clarity for residents and businesses alike so that we can properly move forward with our plans to deliver sustainable growth, much needed homes and new jobs to the area.”

John Fuller, leader of South Norfolk Council, said the rejection of the Hethersett/Cringleford homes alternative would finally signal that South Norfolk cannot take the homes.

If all the councils in the GNDP agree with the recommendation, the public will be consulted later in the year.

Comments on that would go back to the councils in November, when a decision would be made on whether to formally submit the remitted parts of the plan and comments made to public examination, likely to be in early 2013.

An independent planning inspector would then look at the issues, before deciding whether the plan can be adopted by the GNDP next summer.

dan.grimmer@archant.co.uk

16 comments

  • stop building over Norfolk.which political party will save us?

    Report this comment

    bookworm

    Wednesday, July 18, 2012

  • Its all a "done deal" and will keep reviving until the developers get their way

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    Albert Cooper

    Wednesday, July 18, 2012

  • If it is true we need all these new homes I guess all these people will need feeding therefore why oh why build on agricultural land. Also why no new homes in North Norfolk surely the census reveals we need to get an influx of young people in that area to keep schools open.

    Report this comment

    jennifer jane

    Wednesday, July 18, 2012

  • Here we go again! ...Plans for 10,000 homes to the North and East of Norwich are to be put before the council again tomorrow(19 July 2012). Unbiased discussion will no doubt take place, and votes for and against will be cast. Perhaps this media could take it upon themselves to report to the public who voted, and the way Norfolk County Councillors cast their votes. I bel1eve it's called “Transparency”.

    Report this comment

    Joe Rome

    Wednesday, July 18, 2012

  • There are a large number of new build homes in the Norwich area that have remained unsold for SEVERAL YEARS. This shows that there is no demand for more. Therefore you have to ask which Tory councilors have links to the building trade? In addition, the local water supply can't cope with 10,000 new homes and parking in Norwich City centre is already a nightmare.

    Report this comment

    I LoveNorfolk

    Wednesday, July 18, 2012

  • stop building over Norfolk.which political party will save us?

    Report this comment

    bookworm

    Wednesday, July 18, 2012

  • you lot should visit a place outside the UK where the population is low.I have just come back from there and it was lovely.crowds=poor quality of life and troublesome neighbours.See todays's report about top ten things we hate about our neighbours.In a national paper.

    Report this comment

    bookworm

    Wednesday, July 18, 2012

  • stop building over Norfolk.which political party will save us?

    Report this comment

    bookworm

    Wednesday, July 18, 2012

  • There are homes that the council currently restrict to second home use only. Releasing these for local people would not solve the entire problem but would reduce the amount of new homes being built on greenfield sites. Apparently we're all in this together and if so then let's put an end to elitist policies.

    Report this comment

    Homes4locals

    Wednesday, July 18, 2012

  • Unfortunately this will be pushed by the conservative council as it is their justification for the NDR.

    Report this comment

    Marigold

    Thursday, July 19, 2012

  • stop building over Norfolk.which political party will save us?

    Report this comment

    bookworm

    Wednesday, July 18, 2012

  • it is the beginning of the end of the world.

    Report this comment

    bookworm

    Wednesday, July 18, 2012

  • 10,000 homes what are these people going to do for a job ?? who will give them a mortgage to buy the property in the first place and what about the countryside being destroyed to accomodate all this. wake up council and do what the current rate payers want - no more large scale developments as our roads wont take it

    Report this comment

    Ian

    Wednesday, July 18, 2012

  • Now let's see if I understand this correctly. A Judge orders the GNDP ot go away and think again. The GNDP pays for someone to conduct an 'independent' assessment that agrees those who paid for the report were right all along?

    Report this comment

    andy

    Wednesday, July 18, 2012

  • We live in or near a city which is growing rapidly this is what's expected and needed. Yes the roads will get busier but its far from the end of the world.

    Report this comment

    city till i die

    Wednesday, July 18, 2012

  • I am not surprised at all that this unjustified, ill-thought-out and destructive plan has re-emerged "unscathed" after the judgement several months ago. As others have commented, this is a done deal, both for Broadland and for the national developers and other commercial organisations who would be their partners in this scheme. As much as anything, the loss of face that a re-think would have involved would be too much for BDC. It could also lead to pressure on them from Barrett and other house-builders.

    Report this comment

    Trevor Ashwin

    Thursday, July 19, 2012

The views expressed in the above comments do not necessarily reflect the views of this site

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