Photo gallery: Bev the tawny owl is back in the air - but can you save the wildlife rescue centre which helps injured animals like her

Toll Barn Vets, North Walsham, releasing four tawny owls one of which is named after Bev Cosse who was behind the Seal and Bird Rescue Trust in Ridlington. The three young owls.
PHOTO: ANTONY KELLY Toll Barn Vets, North Walsham, releasing four tawny owls one of which is named after Bev Cosse who was behind the Seal and Bird Rescue Trust in Ridlington. The three young owls. PHOTO: ANTONY KELLY

Monday, June 16, 2014
7:00 AM

Bev the tawny owl has flown again after having her car crash broken wing repaired.

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Bev Cosse from the Sea and Bird Rescue Trust.
Pictured with Kyana the European Eagle Owl

Picture: James Bass
Copy: Ed Foss
For: EDP News
Eastern Daily Press © 2010  (01603) 772434Bev Cosse from the Sea and Bird Rescue Trust. Pictured with Kyana the European Eagle Owl Picture: James Bass Copy: Ed Foss For: EDP News Eastern Daily Press © 2010 (01603) 772434

And supporters of a local wildlife rescue centre are hoping her recovery will be symbolic of the charity also soaring upwards from its own crisis.

Bev is named after Bev Cossé, founder of the Seal and Bird Rescue Trust at Ridlington, near North Walsham, which is currently closed following her death last year.

A local vet who fixed the owl’s wing, and was a trustee at the charity, has renewed calls for a key volunteer to step forward to help save the complex.

Faye Bethell said: “Unless a volunteer comes forward to help with the day-to-day running of the centre then it is likely Bev will be the last wildlife Seal and Bird have a hand in releasing.”

Bev the owl was taken to the rescue centre, but because it was closed, she was initially cared for by a local group called the Happisburgh Owls, before being taken to Miss Bethell’s Toll Barn veterinary practice at North Walsham.

There Bev had her wing pinned, and while recuperating has been teamed up with three young tawnies orphaned after falling from their nests.

The taloned tots were reared by Phoenix Bird of Prey Rescue, before being brought to the vet’s for release.

“The youngsters have been learning from her as a mentor rather than a mum – and now all of them are ready to fly and feed,” added Miss Bethell.

The roof was taken off their “hacking” aviary allowing them to find their wings, and their feet in the outside world.

“They can come back and feed until they are ready to go hunting on their own,” she said.

But they soon adapted to life in the wild.

Miss Bethell said: “The owls all came out of the aviary about 9pm led by Bev. They stayed in the trees around the aviary until about 11pm then all flew off beautifully. A really happy sight!”

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