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Photo gallery: Sharing of bread at Great Yarmouth’s Holocaust Memorial Day service

PUBLISHED: 13:53 27 January 2014 | UPDATED: 13:53 27 January 2014

The annual Holocaust Memorial Day service at the small Jewish cemetery on Blackfriars Road, Great Yarmouth. 
Led by Rev Chris Terry.

Picture: James Bass

The annual Holocaust Memorial Day service at the small Jewish cemetery on Blackfriars Road, Great Yarmouth. Led by Rev Chris Terry. Picture: James Bass

Archant Norfolk © 2014

A moment’s silence and the symbolic sharing of bread brought people together inside the walls of Great Yarmouth’s historic Jewish cemetery.

Mayor of Great Yarmouth John Burroughs laying a wreath at the annual Holocaust Memorial Day service at the small Jewish cemetery on Blackfriars Road, Great Yarmouth.  Picture: James Bass Mayor of Great Yarmouth John Burroughs laying a wreath at the annual Holocaust Memorial Day service at the small Jewish cemetery on Blackfriars Road, Great Yarmouth. Picture: James Bass

About 20 people gathered at the Colby’s Gates Jewish cemetery in Blackfriars Road at 11am today for the annual Holocaust Memorial Day service.

Second World War veteran Neville Howell, who witnessed the horrors of the Nazi concentration camps, was among those who laid a wreath during the short service.

The 91-year-old served in the 73rd anti-tank regiment and was among the Allied troops that helped liberate Bergen Belsen in northern Germany.

Speaking to the congregation, Yarmouth team rector Rev Christopher Terry said we all had a duty to remember the people who lost their lives in the camps.

“Each passing year the actual survivors become fewer and fewer, yet for their descendents it remains more than a memory,” he said.

Rev Albert Cadmore gave a reading from the Hebrew bible before the congregation listened to a litany of peace in which Rev Terry asked for “the courage to do the right thing, to speak truth, to oppose what must be opposed, and to build bridges with strangers”.

Video: On Holocaust Memorial Day, Auschwitz survivor Eva Schloss explains why we must never forget.
The Blackfriars Road cemetery, the Kitchener cemetery on Belvedere Road, Yarmouth, and the Jewish cemetery within Caister Municipal Cemetery will all be open today for people to pay their respects.
The Blackfriars Road burial ground, measuring just 13 yards (11.8 metres) by 6 yards (5.4 metres), was the first Jewish cemetery in Yarmouth, situated on a plot of land beneath the old town wall at Colby’s Gate.
The site was originally leased in April 1801 to Simon Hart, a Jewish silversmith who had lived in Yarmouth for about 40 years. Hart’s grave is one of ten in the small walled cemetery.

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