North Norfolk will once again be star of the silver screen when Sir Tony Robinson’s latest programme, Walking Through History, airs on Saturday.

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The final episode of the Channel Four series will see the presenter walk across local landscapes to discover what they were like in the Victorian age.

And viewers can look out for favourite spots, including Cromer, Sheringham, Cley, Blakeney Point, Wells, Holkham, Hunstanton and Sandringham.

The programme features a four-day walking and coastal journey through 40 years of Victorian Norfolk and Sir Tony discovers that late 19th century Norfolk was well-stocked with entrepreneurs, trend-setters, commerce and railways.

He tries to find out how north Norfolk remained largely unaffected by changes elsewhere in Great Britain.

And the programme explores Cromer as a tourist magnet in the 1890s, with the railway bringing with it the fashionable middle classes and the rise of the British summer holiday. Cromer was also one of the first places to introduce mixed bathing.

But the First World War changed British society forever, and while other thriving resorts went on to have huge numbers of families visit each year, Cromer had a few thousand.

Now the railways have diminished and the nature reserves have grown – bringing with them a different kind of tourist.

Exploring shooting estates and seaside resorts, Sir Tony travels over salt-marshes, disused railway lines and barley-growing estates.

He discovers how landowners controlled development and shaped the railways to suit their needs. And from the gentlemen hunters who discovered conservation, to the fashionistas who briefly made Cromer the place to be seen, he discovers the special history of north Norfolk.

Walking Through History will air this Saturday on Channel 4 at 8pm.

A downloadable PDF guide to Tony’s walk is available on the Channel 4 website which enables walkers to follow his route – and learn more about the sites.

Is your area due to feature in a TV programme? Email newsdesk@archant.co.uk

1 comment

  • It's not "an old GNER steam train", it's a BR Standard class steam locomotive, 1950s vintage. GNER is a current railway company, but presumably the caption writer intended to refer to the GER (Great Eastern Railway), which was amalgamated into the LNER in 1923. I think it reasonable to expect that the North Norfolk News should have a passing acquaintance with north Norfolk history...

    Report this comment

    MJB

    Thursday, February 20, 2014

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