Search

North Norfolk radio museum starts search for a new headquarters

PUBLISHED: 06:32 20 August 2013

Bob Smith, a member of North Norfolk Amateur Radio Group, using a vintage 1950's amateur radio station at Muckleburgh Collection to celebrate the centenary of the Radio Society of Great Britain.
PHOTO: ANTONY KELLY

Bob Smith, a member of North Norfolk Amateur Radio Group, using a vintage 1950's amateur radio station at Muckleburgh Collection to celebrate the centenary of the Radio Society of Great Britain. PHOTO: ANTONY KELLY

Archant Norfolk 2013

Just three weeks ago the North Norfolk Amateur Radio Group were taking part in centenary celebrations with radio enthusiasts from around the world – but in two weeks they could be without a home.

Malcolm Prestwood, a member of North Norfolk Amateur Radio Group, using a Morse code key at Muckleburgh Collection to celebrate the centenary of the Radio Society of Great Britain.
PHOTO: ANTONY KELLY Malcolm Prestwood, a member of North Norfolk Amateur Radio Group, using a Morse code key at Muckleburgh Collection to celebrate the centenary of the Radio Society of Great Britain. PHOTO: ANTONY KELLY

For the past 23 years the NNARG has occupied a hut within the grounds of the Muckleburgh Military Collection at Weybourne, but the group say they have now been asked to “vacate the site at short notice”.

NNARG secretary, Steve Appleyard, said he had informed Muckleburgh bosses that the group would be leaving in two weeks’ time, saying: “We were surprised to be asked to leave at short notice with no apparent reason.”

The group are now hoping to find a new base for the museum, which regularly hosted school visits. Its collection includes radio transmitters and receivers used by all three armed services and radios used for intelligence gathering, surveillance and espionage during the Second World War and later, as well as a collection of vintage domestic
broadcast radios.

Sir Michael Savory, managing partner of the Muckleburgh Collection, said the group had needed more space which could not be provided at Muckleburgh.

When asked if he was disappointed that the 23 years of the group being based at the site were coming to an end Mr Savory said: “Quite honestly, visitors come to Muckleburgh for military vehicles.

“We don’t get many solely to come and see the radio group. The big difference is they are only open one or two days a week.”

The volunteers who run the radio museum are now hopeful they can combine with another tourist attraction to continue their work.

Bill Ward, NNARG’s chairman, said: “We are sure that we would complement a number of existing visitor attractions in north Norfolk – bringing in additional tourists as well as local residents who regularly visit the museum.”

- Anyone interested in offering the museum a new home can contact secretary Steve Appleyard on 01263 519485 or sfappleyard@btinternet.com

Comments have been disabled on this article.

Most Read

Newsletter Sign Up

Sign up to the following newsletters:

Sign up to receive our regular email newsletter

Latest from the EDP

Show Job Lists

Partly Cloudy

Partly Cloudy

max temp: 20°C

min temp: 16°C

Listen to the latest weather forecast