Dr Henry Mannings in his office at the Star throwers cancer support charity he has started in Wymondham.

Petition formed in support of Norfolk cancer centre founder

Friday, December 7, 2012
6.30 AM

A petition has been formed in support of a doctor, who created a Norfolk cancer support centre, after a formal complaint was made against him.

A General Medical Council (GMC) investigation was launched after an oncologist at the Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital made a complaint against Henry Mannings, who runs the Star Throwers charity in Wymondham.

Patients and families who have benefited from the care of the experienced doctor have now begun writing in support of Dr Mannings and have set up a petition supporting him, whilst an investigation continues.

An Interim Orders Panel last week imposed conditions on the founder of Star Throwers whilst the GMC looks into the allegation that Dr Mannings, who is NHS-registered, gave chemotherapy to two patients without authorisation.

Now 75 ex-patients or their families have written letters in support of the charity and the help they received. And a petition that was started on Tuesday has already attracted 200 signatures.

Star Throwers remains open and continues to offer holistic therapies and one-to-one support and advice. However, Dr Mannings has been banned from prescribing drugs outside of the NHS, which has restricted his work at the cancer support centre in Melton Road, Wymondham.

Star Throwers was set up by Dr Mannings in 2009, who served as a GP for 33 years, and recently resigned as a doctor of oncology at the James Paget Hospital in Gorleston.

Steven Ho, centre manager, said the GMC restriction meant that Dr Mannings was unable to continue treatments on cancer patients at the Wymondham centre and the complaint appeared to arise from a “misinterpretation” of his work.

“Up to five terminal cancer patients, at any one time, can be given immunotherapy treatment for their illness at Star Throwers and as the restriction is with immediate effect, several patients have been left in mid course as well as leaving several potential patients disappointed at being unable to start their potentially life extending treatment.”

“Endorsements of Dr Mannings professional approach to work ethics and administration of drugs was also received from practising medical professionals and past work colleagues of Dr Mannings. All evidence suggested that work carried out at Star Throwers was ethical and carried out in a proper and professional manner.”

“In fact, in the whole of his career Dr Mannings has never received one letter of complaint from a patient.

The support for the charity has been phenomenal and a campaign of support is in place to take forward the appeal,” he said.

Dr Mannings is alleged to have given chemotherapy without authorisation to two patients, Rachel Lane, 27, and Thelma Dowsett, 78, who both died in October. However, their families have made no complaint about Dr Mannings or Star Throwers.

The charity has helped 400 cancer sufferers and carers since its formation.

To support the petition, visit www.ipetitions.com/petition/in-support-of-dr-henry-mannings, email

info@starthrowers.org.uk or write to Star Throwers at 30 Melton Road, Wymondham, NR18 0DB