Patient safety will be put at risk if mental health bosses’ plans to axe 500 jobs in Norfolk and Suffolk are put into action, according to senior psychiatrists.

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Mental health cuts

Aidan Thomas, chief executive at Norfolk and Suffolk NHS Foundation Trust, said: “Following the launch of the Trust’s Service Strategy employee consultation in October 2012, we have received more than 900 responses from our staff.

“As a result of the consultation we have identified more than 50 changes to our plans. These will go to the Trust’s Board of Directors for approval tomorrow, before being discussed at a joint Norfolk and Suffolk Health Overview and Scrutiny Committee on Monday.

“We also continue to receive feedback from stakeholder and partner organisations and this will also influence the final plans.

“The Service Strategy is a clinically-led response to the challenges we face including the need to reduce our costs by around 5% per year for four years. The proposals have been drawn up in partnership with staff, service users, family carers, commissioners and other local providers. The focus is on wellbeing (keeping people well and avoiding ill-health) and recovery (helping people back to their normal lives) and developing more services in the community, while providing high quality inpatient care for those with a clinical need for it.

“Detailed plans have been developed to ensure quality and safety is central to any changes that are made, with stringent management processes in place. We will continue to involve commissioners and other stakeholders as the detailed plans for each service are finalised.”

And they claim the Norfolk and Suffolk NHS Foundation Trust (NSFT) is being “downright dishonest’’ for failing to state that the cuts will have detrimental effects on patient care.

The trust revealed proposals to make the cuts last year, citing a need to make 20pc savings in the next four years as the justification for a radical redesign of the service.

The initial plans anticipated a 33pc reduction in medical staff, including a 31pc cut in consultant psychiatrists, a 50pc cut in staff grade psychiatrists and a 32pc cut in senior nurses by 2016.

Dr Chris Jones, a consultant forensic psychiatrist and chairman of the Local Negotiating Committee, and Dr Marlies Jansen, a consultant general adult psychiatrist and member of the Royal College of Psychiatrists, have written letters which will be considered by a joint Norfolk and Suffolk Health Scrutiny meeting on Monday.

But the trust chief executive, Aidan Thomas, said consultation had resulted in more than 50 changes to the original plans.

Despite “bland assurances” Dr Jones said in a letter to NSFT medical director Hadrian Ball: “The proposed reductions to medical and other clinical staff will have a major impact on the quality of clinical care provided.”

He added: “The clear implication of much of the proposals is that current levels of quality and activity will be maintained or even increased. We consider that this is totally inconceivable that the current level of service could be maintained in the face of such reductions.

“We consider that it is totally unsustainable, and that it is at best disingenuous and at worst downright dishonest of the trust to promote these proposals without clearly stating the effect that such a reduction in capacity will inevitably have on patients.

“We believe that it is inevitable within these proposals that both the quantity and quality of service delivery will decline, and that this will result in significant risks to patient safety.”

Dr Jones raises concerns that the cuts will put staff under “extreme pressure to accept increased workloads and increased pressure of work, with the inevitable reduction in service quality and patient safety that this will entail.”

The letter goes on to criticise the 90-day consultation, stating staff have not been given adequate time to respond.

Dr Jones added: “We do not consider that this is true or meaningful consultation, and we do not consider that this is allowing staff a reasonable opportunity to engage with a process which is likely to have devastating consequences, not only for patient care but also for the individual careers of members of staff.”

And Dr Jansen raised concerns about the quality of service in more rural areas.

“In rural areas, staff are likely to be so overstretched that doing home visits will no longer be feasible,” Dr Jansen said.

“Psychiatrists will no longer have the time to travel to outlying clinics. This will seriously affect the access to care for our most isolated and vulnerable patients and result in less contact between mental health professionals and GPs.”

The newly formed Norfolk and Suffolk Joint Scrutiny Committee will consider the plans at its first meeting in Norwich on Monday.

Councillors from both counties will scrutinise whether the changes are in the interests of the health service in Norfolk and Suffolk and the impact the proposals will have on patient and carer experience.

They will assess the quality of the clinical evidence underlying the proposals and whether they are financially sustainable.

The committee will also consider and comment on the extent to which patients and the public have been consulted on the proposals, and the extent to which their views have been taken into account.

8 comments

  • i agree i am in the same position i care for 3 in my home 2 with mental and 1 very close..the problem i have is they say if i cant cope with 1 of them they can send to a foster carer as they can get funding ,,,why break a family up why not have the funding to help at home ....its the same all over with care and this govt alter the forms to save a penny but spend a pound to get it ..get rid of staff to save ....how things are going with the rise in suicides etc there will be more need for the service of mental care

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    daylo

    Thursday, February 7, 2013

  • i agree i am in the same position i care for 3 in my home 2 with mental and 1 very close..the problem i have is they say if i cant cope with 1 of them they can send to a foster carer as they can get funding ,,,why break a family up why not have the funding to help at home ....its the same all over with care and this govt alter the forms to save a penny but spend a pound to get it ..get rid of staff to save ....how things are going with the rise in suicides etc there will be more need for the service of mental care

    Report this comment

    daylo

    Thursday, February 7, 2013

  • Aidan Thomas you buffoon, nobody believes that you can maintain service levels so why trot out that stupid line. Yet again mental health services are seen as the poor relation of the NHS

    Report this comment

    robotsthatcare

    Thursday, February 7, 2013

  • Wonder how much could be saved if they just trimmed the "consultant's" fees?

    Report this comment

    richard black

    Thursday, February 7, 2013

  • Inpatients have very different backgrounds and needs.They all deserve the maximum support to help regain control of their minds, for their and their family's sake. Cutting psychiatrist and nursing care cannot help the human need for those professionals who give security and understanding when someone is mentally ill.

    Report this comment

    bedoomed

    Thursday, February 7, 2013

  • i agree i am in the same position i care for 3 in my home 2 with mental and 1 very close..the problem i have is they say if i cant cope with 1 of them they can send to a foster carer as they can get funding ,,,why break a family up why not have the funding to help at home ....its the same all over with care and this govt alter the forms to save a penny but spend a pound to get it ..get rid of staff to save ....how things are going with the rise in suicides etc there will be more need for the service of mental care

    Report this comment

    daylo

    Thursday, February 7, 2013

  • The very worrying increase in the numbers of people taking their own lives,especially men between 30-44, announced last week means this is the wrong time to be cutting clinical support for the most vulnerable.As yet,too,the Trust have not published details of the systemic risk assessment of the impact of these cuts to prove they have fulfilled their fundamental statutory duty of care.Those in need of care now and in the future,and their carers,have a right to know whether the service is safe.Unfortunately, accountability is in short supply in the NHS so sadly the only route to NHS justice may only come from corporate manslaughter charges being brought against those at the top who are negligent in protecting patient safety.

    Report this comment

    Peter Watson

    Thursday, February 7, 2013

  • This is a total disgrace. Getting any care and treatment via the mental health team is already a nightmare. We were recently told our CAMHS had no permanent psychiatrists for under 18's. My own child is lucky if seen by a locum once every few months and has been down for urgent treatment for around a year now. We are still awaiting the actual treatment to start and for now my child has to take a high dose of a powerful medication. I spend each day dreading my child going into a meltdown that I cannot bring out of and my child keeps asking why the drs are not helping. I wonder and live in fear that that day wont come until it is to late. Now have to add the fear of even more cuts in an area where getting treatment is near impossible already. Maybe the people making the cuts would like to spend some time in my shoes or, even better, my child's shoes!

    Report this comment

    Elly

    Thursday, February 7, 2013

The views expressed in the above comments do not necessarily reflect the views of this site

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