Sizewell C’s nuclear power plant vision will create a jobs bonanza for Norfolk and Suffolk

Picture showing Sizewell B Picture showing Sizewell B

Wednesday, November 21, 2012
8:09 AM

Plans to build a new nuclear power station at Sizewell will pave the way for a jobs bonanza in Norfolk and Suffolk – with the aim of employing 25,000 people over nine years.

To send a link to this page to a friend, you must be logged in.

Sizewell CSizewell C

The announcement comes today as EDF Energy launches its public consultation on the proposed development of the Sizewell C power station, which will cost £6bn and generate enough electricity to power five million homes.

Business leaders have used the moment to urge enterprises across the east to seize “one of the biggest opportunities” of the next decade, which will includes major develop-ments and infrastructure projects for Suffolk.

It is estimated that the project could be worth as much as £100m a year to the local economy during construction – and a further £40m a year thereafter.

But campaigners have warned of the potential dangers of the project amid claims that nuclear energy is unsafe and will damage a swathe of the Suffolk countryside.

In the consultation documents released today, EDF has proposed:

Two new UK EPR reactors at Sizewell C next door to Sizewell B;

Possible sites for a new visitors’ centre;

Possible sites for a temporary campus to house about 3,000 workers;

Park and ride facilities for workers who commute;

An upgrade of the rail network near Sizewell so it could be used for freight delivery during construction;

A jetty for sea delivery during the construction of the power station;

A lorry park with 50 to 100 parking spaces;

Road improvements, with the possibility of a bypass of part of the A12.

EDF Energy’s Richard Mayson, director of planning and external affairs nuclear new build, said: “Sizewell C would generate enough electricity to supply one in five homes in Britain.

“It would make an important contribution to the UK’s future needs for low carbon, secure and affordable energy.

“It would also create significant business, training and employment opportunities locally, regionally and throughout the UK.”

“During the construction period of Sizewell B, the most recent nuclear reactor to be built in the UK, over 3,000 UK companies were involved with 690 from East Anglia.

“During the peak construction phase over 5,000 people were employed with a large proportion from the local area.”

French-owned EDF revealed that the Sizewell C power station will cover 32 hectares of land and be built next to the current Sizewell A and B power stations near the village of Leiston.

It follows a government consultation which pinpointed Sizewell as one of eight sites suitable for a new power station by 2025.

The public are now being asked to give their views on how the project should be delivered.

EDF predicts that Sizewell C will create 25,000 on-site jobs during the power station’s lifespan, including 5,600 people working on the site’s construction, and 900 people to operate it once it is finished.

Meanwhile, bosses at EDF said they are committed to making sure local people are ready to take advantage of the opportunity by working in partnership with colleges, businesses, and local authorities to build training programmes.

Chris Starkie, programme director at New Anglia Local Enterprise Partnership, has hailed the project as the “single biggest opportunity” for Norfolk and Suffolk in the next 20 years.

He said: “The consultation is a really important stage because it shows how determined EDF are to progress with this significant investment project that will create thousands of jobs for Norfolk and Suffolk over many years.

“I think Norfolk and Suffolk can be ready to take advantage of the opportunities because construction will not start for a number of years, so young people can start to be trained.

“What we want to ensure is that the local area benefits from these jobs, so they do not have to import too much skilled labour from outside.

“Along with offshore wind, this is the single biggest opportunity we are likely to have in the next 10 or 20 years.”

Caroline Williams, chief executive officer of Norfolk Chamber of Commerce, has been working closely with Suffolk Chamber of Commerce to make sure businesses are aware of the opportunities the new power station will pose.

She said: “As part of its procurement strategy for Sizewell C, EDF Energy has joined with the Suffolk and Norfolk Chambers of Commerce as the first point of contact for business and agencies wishing to engage in the construction of the project, and to support local businesses that want to become part of the supply chain.

“EDF have created a trading platform www.sizewellcsupplychain.co.uk allowing tier 1 and 2 companies to easily engage with smaller businesses.”

17 comments

  • I can't understand the obsession with nuclear power. Surely it is in no way" green" & is the most dangerous option. Every nuclear station is a game of Russian roulette which can cause lasting catastrophic damage to the population, enviroment & economy. It's become an "easy" option pollitically, but I'm terrified at such short-term myopic "solutions". Of cousre it will create jobs for a while, but so would building a concentration camp, or a huge open cast mine. I'd hoped the"sexy" nuclear option had finally seen it's day a few years ago, but it seems we have a morbid fetish for risking disaster. If only we'd look to safer alternatives such as solar, geothermal, tidal or wave etc. I wonder how much nuclear is driven by big money buisiness interests. How can Sizewell be in any way safe on such a low lying & rapidly eroding coastline?

    Report this comment

    Frank

    Wednesday, November 21, 2012

  • I'm still not convinced EPRs are the way to go. Not least because one has yet to be tested. The first, due to open in Finland 2009 has been beset with problems and delays and is now due to be completed in 2014.. I seem to remember that Siemens pulled out of the project?. and there was an issue with the computer control systems? Not very re-assuring is it? The energy gap is predicted 2017-2022 so nuclear wont fill this. We will need to extend life of the conventional power stations. If we do this and include carbon capture and sequestation we wouldn't need nuclear at all for some time. By which time something better and less risky can be developed..

    Report this comment

    Dave01

    Friday, November 23, 2012

  • MSM seems to have dropped the biggest nuclear disaster this century fairly quickly for some unknown reasons. However, Fukushima fallout and leaks are still ongoing and the energy company, plus the Japanese government are still treating their own folk as numpties when it comes to telling the truth about high levels of radiation in the food and water chains.

    Report this comment

    nrg

    Wednesday, November 21, 2012

  • Unfortunately we need large amounts of power quickly or we will have a shortfall in the next 10 years. Due to the amount of time it has taken government to realise that wind power is not the answer ( Never was and never could be), nuclear is the quickest option, if only the time and money wasted on wind had been spent on tidal systems and other more reliable "green" systems we would not need nuclear. Although on the other hand, i live within 20 minutes of Sizewell and the thought of having another station there does not unduly concern me. And if we get a start on the A12 improvements as a bribe, all the better

    Report this comment

    DaveG

    Thursday, November 22, 2012

  • google...TEPCO, Japanese government denying Fukushima radiation reaching ocean fish

    Report this comment

    nrg

    Wednesday, November 21, 2012

  • should read. Off course it will not generate weapons garde plutonium, long term troublesome waste for our children, but benign constant power from our tides. It will last longer than Sizewell C and have no pollution issues.

    Report this comment

    ingo wagenknecht

    Wednesday, November 21, 2012

  • "Sizewell C’s nuclear power plant vision will create a jobs bonanza for Norfolk and Suffolk". Nice to see balanced reporting from the EDP, as usual. Funnily enough, no mention of the nuclear waste problem that will blight future generations...

    Report this comment

    DrJB

    Wednesday, November 21, 2012

  • As with the existing power station, this will be very close to Southwold. Why do many people in Southwold worry about oil tankers at sea off the town, when this new monster is to be only a few miles down the coast.

    Report this comment

    Port Watcher

    Wednesday, November 21, 2012

  • According to EDF the 25,000 jobs are temporary lasting on average 1 year and only 20% will be going to local people. This will be spread over 10 years. The overall impact in the job market in the area will therefore be quite small.

    Report this comment

    plunk

    Thursday, November 22, 2012

  • This minority coalition is hell bent on letting foreign concerns and foibles determine our energy market, with not a single peep made to enable small producer, bar large landowners, they treat us as cattle. Why does EDF no build a molten salt reactor as a last resort, if any at all, these do not produce plutonium and run on nuclear waste, the problem heaped on us and future generations. That said, nuclear power is expensive, dangerous for more than one reason and unsustainable. Tidal power will always be there, waves, sea currents, and most important better insulation and energy saving, can all, achieve the same result providing 250.000 jobs nationwide, safeguard our fenland's from salt water inundation and providing energy for ourselves, without being dependent on Russian gas or French nuclear power.

    Report this comment

    ingo wagenknecht

    Thursday, November 22, 2012

  • For every one of us, who think we have the answer, there are 10,000 ‘ordinary consumers’ who want energy on demand, at any cost. In the real world of ordinary consumers, it doesn’t matter where the energy comes from as long as it’s there 247 and maintains their standard of living, in their industrialised, urbanised environment. In the real world of ordinary consumers, condemning 2 million people to early graves, sacrificing a few lizard species, worrying about a few tens or hundreds of thousands of people being affected by the odd hurricane or freak weather event is completely irrelevant. When the stuff hits the fan, from the range of catastrophic choices on offer, the driver of opinion of the ordinary consumer will narrow down to energy security. Those in power must guarantee as much energy as is needed to maintain and even improve standards of living and that energy must be available on demand. Even before climate change, which is at the forefront of scientific thinking and that of many national governments, instabilities, in the form of energy or water conflicts, may raise their ugly heads. The generations of our children and grandchildren will be confounded by attempts to keep their lights on with a spaghetti-like (international) interconnection of windmills, plastic squares, wavey -contraptions and volcanic heat. They will not forgive us for disregarding a technology that can fuel an energy-rich, industrialised, urbanised society for 500 years from existing, secure resources. These energy resources are in the form of spent nuclear fuel, 35,000 tonnes of depleted uranium and 55 tonnes of weapons-grade plutonium. PRISM PB technology, tested by 30 years of electricity generation, is here and now and a fleet of them would 'burn' those resources to provide all of the electricity we need. The minuscule amount of waste produced decays to background radiation levels in only 300 years - easily, cheaply and safely stored. Their deployment can give the UK unrivalled levels of energy security and prosperity. We have the technological expertise and manufacturing capacity to build these reactors in their entirety and get back to a proud manufacturing base we have not experienced in generations. Everybody prepared to put any thought into the well being of future generations should get behind the only technology that has a chance of providing the UK with an energy-rich future. Google “prisms to power the uk”

    Report this comment

    prismsuk

    Wednesday, November 21, 2012

  • I am sick and tired about all this moaning about Sizewell C. It will create jobs, the legacy of waste has been delt with safely for the last 60 years. Fukushima survived a grade 8 earthquake (Dont remember any of those happening here!!!). So it is a French company building it, whos fault is that. I believe Mrs Thatcher sold all the crown jewels in the 80s to companies that can do the job properly. A lot of the complainers here are so called local residents who are worried about the area being spoilt by another new building. Damage has been done in this area already by second home owners, who have taken all the property from younsters around here in the first place, except Leiston, because its too near the site and not created real jobs except seasonal ones in fashionable shops and art galleries down the road in Aldeburgh. This is the real problem, selfishness. There are local kids in Suffolk Coastal who need real jobs to pay rent because they cannot afford the rediculous house prices around here. to quote the hypocrisy here I bet the same people were moaning about the green proposal of building a wind farm at Parham airfield 5 years ago.!!!! because it spoiled the view and would decrease house price houses. I have lived here a long long time and have no objectives to C at all if it even gives a glint of hope to the young people around here and proper local residents trying to earn a decent wage. We are in a recession and although quite a while ago whilst completing my Ecomomic A level, the only way to get out of recession is build, build and build. You just have to read history i.e The New Deal in USA (Hoover Dam) and Nazi Germany ( Autobahnns). This is the modern day equal. It will happen and thank goodness. The sooner the better and if my house price in Saxmundham goes down and a few greater crested warblers fly off somewhere else then that is the price to pay. People that have moved here in the last 20 years always will have known Sizewell C was always a big possibility if not more fool them, or the come out of the woodwork and object. Remember whatever happens the lights have to stay on

    Report this comment

    AliD

    Wednesday, November 21, 2012

  • When I see the old chestnut trotted out '1000's of jobs' I tend to think hot air or BS..EDF being foreign government owned, that tend to look after their own countrymen first, with a few crumbs thrown to the local natives.

    Report this comment

    nrg

    Wednesday, November 21, 2012

  • Come on fact man, tell us all about the waste pile, how much it costs to look after it, now, and in future.Who will pay for decommissioning after its lifetime, Hmm, what lifetime has it got? more than thirty years? As yet we do not know the full extent of Fukushima and its radioactive aftermath, there are still, over 20 hotspots and some areas of Japan have been depopulated fro decades ahead, we should not jump to conclusions and or act in haste, would you not agree fact man?

    Report this comment

    ingo wagenknecht

    Thursday, November 22, 2012

  • Most of the comments above are off the cuff remarks that have no weight behind them! Lets look at pure statistics, such as death! How many people have died due to smog? How many people have died due to radiation leaks? How much dies it cost to gens rate a KW of electricity from a wind turbine and how much per KW from Nuclear? I could go on and on but I hope you above get the picture. Facts are the only way to sort this not your off the cuff comments.

    Report this comment

    Fact man

    Thursday, November 22, 2012

  • French owned , wind farms are foreign owned - they get the profits - we pay for it , through the nose .

    Report this comment

    dragonfly

    Wednesday, November 21, 2012

  • The jobs bonanza is limited to the ten year period it takes to build this dangerous monstrosity, after that only those who run and maintain the plant will run it. A wash barrier would dispense with the need of two power stations, with benign power and much safer Fenlands as a result. Off course it would not generate weapons grade plutonium, just long term troublesome waste for our children's children. What would make sense, if at all, is a molten salt reactor, they operate by burning the used waste fuel that is left and would be an answer to the existing stockpile of waste accrued. Fukushima has happened here during the iron age, why tempt fait?

    Report this comment

    ingo wagenknecht

    Wednesday, November 21, 2012

The views expressed in the above comments do not necessarily reflect the views of this site

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Norfolk Weather

Partly Cloudy

Partly Cloudy

max temp: 24°C

min temp: 16°C

Five-day forecast

loading...

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT