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Norfolk MP calls for review of Hunting Ban, as thousands attend Boxing Day meets.

PUBLISHED: 13:38 26 December 2011 | UPDATED: 18:01 26 December 2011

MP George Freeman (left) speaks to the crowd before the West Norfolk Fox Hounds Asscociation Boxing Day Hunt, starting from Fakenham Race Course. Picture Matthew Usher.

MP George Freeman (left) speaks to the crowd before the West Norfolk Fox Hounds Asscociation Boxing Day Hunt, starting from Fakenham Race Course. Picture Matthew Usher.

Archant © 2011 01603 772434

As thousands turned out for the traditional Boxing Day meets today, a Norfolk MP called on the Government to launch an inquiry into the impacts of the Hunting Ban upon the countryside.

Mid Norfolk MP George Freeman is calling for a special parliamentary committee to review the 2004 Hunting Act.

Speaking before the West Norfolk Foxhounds set off from Fakenham racecourse this morning, Mr Freeman said hunting was “enmeshed” in the history of Norfolk.

“Through their employment of people in often remote areas, their membership and events, support for pony clubs and the wider equestrian economy, local hunts play a vital role in the rural economy,” he said.

“Horse racing in particular is dependent on the hunts for the network of point to points which underpin National Hunt Racing.”

mr Freeman is calling for an inquiry into the impacts of the ban, which came into force in 2005, before MPs take part in the coalition’s promised free vote on the issue.

“Before we have that vote, let’s set up a parliamentary committee of inquiry to find out what effect the ban is really having,” he said.

“All the anecdotal evidence is that the ban is bad for animal welfare, bad for the countryside, bad for the rural economy and a waste of police resources.

“Let’s look at the evidence properly so we can decide on repeal on the basis of the facts rather than political bigotry and class war against the countryside.”

Before the hounds set off this morning, he told hunt supporters: “Across the land today hunts are meeting. We have a new parliament, 250 new MPs and I’m confident that with your support we can get some sensible law and stop people, good law-abiding people, being at risk of prosecution every Saturday.”

Buffy Wilcox, the hunt’s field master, said today’s meet was the first time the pack had been able to hunt on Boxing Day for three years.

Today, the weather was windy but mild in. What many would regard as a good scenting day before the ban.

Mr Wilcox said the hunt would be operating lawfully, before the huntsman’s horn sounded to signal the start.

David Hunter, chief executive of Fakenham racecourse, said racing and hunting were closely linked.

“National Hunt racing in Norfolk started with a private racing club, through members of the West Norfolk Hunt, that was in 1888,” he said. “There’s a close link which we’re proud of.”

Thousands also turned out as the Waveney Harriers paraded through Bungay, beginning at Clay’s car park on Chaucer Street before moving on to Earsham Street and Market Place.

Joint-master Dominoc Parravani said it was an “absolutely fantastic” event.

“We always have a huge show of support from the town and the local area,” he said.

“It just gets bigger and bigger every year and this year we had about 3,000 people turn out.”

The Harriers also collected donations for All Hallows Hospital and East Coast Hospice.

At Wymondham, the Dunston Harriers were claiming a record attendance.

Officials said it proved the hunt’s popularity with the rural community despite a ban on fox hunting introduced by the Hunting Act in 2005.

hunt master Brad Webb said: “It is a great turnout. You can see how important it is just by looking about today and we are a small percentage of the people attending hunts across the country today.”

About 100 foot followers, including many children, turned out to watch about 55 mounted members of the North Norfolk Harriers and their hounds taking part in their traditional Sennowe Park meet, at Guist, near Dereham.

Senior master Roger Bradbury said they had all been on foot last year because of the hard ground but had enjoyed a wonderful day of Boxing Day sunshine this year.

He added: “We’re getting very fed up with this ban and would like it repealed. It’s very much a sport for everybody.”

Agriculture Minister Jim Paice earlier claimed that the Hunting Act “simply doesn’t work”.

Mr Paice said he is in favour of hunting with dogs while visiting Milton Park in Peterborough ahead of the annual Boxing Day hunt.

Hunt supporters have described the act as “failed”, and under the terms of the coalition agreement there will be a vote on whether to repeal it.

The Countryside Alliance estimates that more than 250,000 people are expected to turn out today to 300 hunts across the UK.

“The current law simply doesn’t work,” said Mr Paice.

“I personally am in favour of hunting with dogs - and the coalition agreement clearly states that we will have a free vote on whether to repeal the act when there is time in the parliamentary calendar to do so.”

Countryside Alliance chief executive Alice Barnard said: “It is a point of pride for rural communities across Britain that, despite the prejudice and ignorance of some, hunting remains as strong as ever.

“This Boxing Day we are expecting a quarter of a million people to come out in support of their local hunt. Added to this, the visit of the hunting minister to a hunt kennels is a very welcome and strong show of support from this Government.

“The Countryside Alliance is delighted to be in such a strong position to push for the repeal of the expensive and failed Hunting Act.”

League Against Cruel Sports chief executive Joe Duckworth said: “It is utterly appalling that people can think the act of chasing a wild animal with hounds to the point of exhaustion and then taking pleasure in watching it being killed is acceptable.

“This cruel blood sport has thankfully been made illegal in this country and there is absolutely no desire among the general public to bring it back.”

The coalition Government has promised to allow MPs a free vote on whether to bring forward legislation to repeal the Hunting Act, which made it illegal to hunt wild animals using dogs.

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58 comments

  • What constitutes humane hunting? Could it be a class thing i dare to say? People 'down' the social ladder who carry out hare coursing are frowned upon but i wonder if that was carried out proceeded with glasses of sherry,it would be more acceptable. To say the dogs love it maybe the case but if you had a 3 year old child running across a field trailing their comfort blanket, i am sure the dogs would love that too.

    Report this comment

    smalltownboy

    Monday, December 26, 2011

  • So a law is passed and continues to be supported by 75% of the population but these cruel spoilt idiots feel they have a right to break the law and push to have this law overturned. Fox hunters are barbaric and something from the Middle Ages for goodness sake!!

    Report this comment

    Sportswagon

    Monday, December 26, 2011

  • I enjoy Daisyroots too but have to say she is mistaken in her reason for the ban. The Leagues Against Cruel Sports was instrumental in organising and agitating MPs to support the ban motion in the house. Some might have voted for other reasons but many of us feel that it is totally barbaric.

    Report this comment

    Sportswagon

    Wednesday, December 28, 2011

  • George`s reward is pending. He is the Quarry. It`ll be short and sweet because he lacks the athleticism to make his escape. The mixed up "class" of people doing it should also do Quarry Shifts. Freeman is accustomed to being whipped in Parliament. Clearly enjoys this bucolic version, administered by his Lords and Masters.

    Report this comment

    Mad Brewer

    Monday, December 26, 2011

  • How strange, no comment from foxhunting supremo Bill Borrett here - maybe he's in enough hot water already with his useless incinerator without quoting more non-existent public consensus piffle for something else that's deeply unpopular with the public at large?

    Report this comment

    User Removed

    Tuesday, December 27, 2011

  • The arguments about animals going off to die a long lingering death after being shot seem to me to be a bit of a red herring. It must happen occasionally but as no hunter is likely to admit to it, the evidence for this argument is almost non existent. Most animals which are despatched by a gun die quickly, if not instantly. In the majority of cases the animal being hunted is rarely aware of the person who ends up killing it. Contrast this with being chased for some considerable time by a pack of baying hounds and being exposed to the extreme sense of fear and anxiety and terror a fox endures and the argument about which form of death is preferable is obviously the gun. To have to die is not nice, but if that is the only answer then dying by being shot seems the least objectionable way of doing it!

    Report this comment

    Douglas McCoy

    Thursday, December 29, 2011

  • There is nothing wrong with hunting or the mixed class of people doing it.

    Report this comment

    bookworm

    Monday, December 26, 2011

  • Agriculture ministers' Jim Plaice claim that the ban doesn't work maybe the case but surely we pay MP's to uphold the law and find better ways to implement them. Any humane person can see hunting with dogs is wrong, its not just the fox but what about the horses and hounds injured and what happens to the hounds when they are too old to hunt? A good home with countryside walks and pedigree chum or just 'humanely dispatched'?

    Report this comment

    smalltownboy

    Monday, December 26, 2011

  • If these dogs killed a cat, or another dog, the owners would be prosecuted, foxes have the same rights to roam and be free animals as cats, yes they kill chickens, cats kill birds. If they need controlling at least do it in a humane manner, dogs ripping a fox apart is totally moronic. Just who are the people who enjoy it and see it as a sport?

    Report this comment

    Mr T

    Tuesday, December 27, 2011

  • What would Jesus do? I don't think this question has been answered to any degree of satisfaction.

    Report this comment

    Yahweh or the Highway

    Wednesday, December 28, 2011

  • How interesting, the random way in which posts appear making posters look twits. In my book, although I could no longer support hunting, the ban represents how this country has gone daft- it was not banned because those objecting understood it, nor because it was spear heading a drive against animal cruelty, but because of wetness. On the whole I reckon those who hunt probably know more and care more about animal welfare and do more hands on and in money terms for the environment than all the soft fools who are overly sentimental about their pets. It is the difference between the care of the old skilled horseman and the silly girl who thinks because she loves her pony she is looking after it correctly. The ban represents the success of noisy media campaigns in manipulating politicians and happened at a time when sensible folk saw there were more important things to worry about.

    Report this comment

    Daisy Roots

    Tuesday, December 27, 2011

  • Andy :*****Larson, but they did vote for the Conservatives who said they would overturn the hunting ban.******Wrong on both counts. The Tories said they would simply provide a free vote. And most people did not vote conservative. And if there were a referendum on the issue , the antis would undoubtedly win.

    Report this comment

    LARSON.E. WHIPSNADE

    Wednesday, December 28, 2011

  • The idea suggested by Ms Roots that the countryside today exists as it does because it was designed that way by men in fancy dress to provide obstacles to jump over on horse back is of course absurd. The familiar farming landscape we see in Britain today is the result of changes which occurred hundreds of years ago in the way farming was carried out. Got more to do with Jethro Tull than arrogant oafs trampling over peoples farm land and killing their pet cats and dogs for fun.

    Report this comment

    LARSON.E. WHIPSNADE

    Tuesday, December 27, 2011

  • I do hope the Tory Toffs try to repeal the ban ...it will be electoral suicde. Three in four of the British public (76%) support the ban on fox hunting remaining, while just one in six (18%) want it repealed, according to a Ipsos MORI survey published in Dec. 2010 The poll found that over eight in ten think the ban on deer hunting, hare hunting and coursing should remain illegal.In rural communities, seven in ten people (71%) want to see fox hunting remain illegal, whilst 81% think deer hunting should continue to be banned, and 84% support the ban on hare hunting and coursing.

    Report this comment

    LARSON.E. WHIPSNADE

    Monday, December 26, 2011

  • ****why do the antis think it right to dictate how we want to live our lives*** . Its called democracy Sam. We decided it was cruel , immoral and pointless and as a nation voted to stop it. Much the same happened to dog and cock fighting and bear baiting. Much to the outrage of the sad and perverted souls who enjoyed these activities. Tough. Some people have to be dragged into the civilsed world.

    Report this comment

    LARSON.E. WHIPSNADE

    Tuesday, December 27, 2011

  • Sam: Hunting is not necessarily cruel and in some cases needed, it is the method you adopt that is cruel, a clean kill with bullet has to be better than being ripped apart by a bunch of hounds while the real animals watch.

    Report this comment

    Mr T

    Tuesday, December 27, 2011

  • Yes I guess it's payback time for old George. The people who put him where he is now want a return.

    Report this comment

    Bloater

    Monday, December 26, 2011

  • By all means wear fancy dress and ride around the countryside, it is the pantomime season after all and, sure, people enjoy the spectacle - something to do instead of watching the TV or spending in the sales. Just draw the line at hounding wild animals to their deaths. Keep your sadistic bloodlust private please. BTW if 250,000 turned out to watch they still represent less than 0.5% of the population of England.

    Report this comment

    Thoreauwasright

    Monday, December 26, 2011

  • How about some urban hunts to reduce the number of feral youths terrorising our towns and cities. Norwich Chav Harriers anyone?

    Report this comment

    Betty Swallocks

    Thursday, December 29, 2011

  • The idea suggested by Ms Roots that the countryside today exists as it does because it was designed that way by men in fancy dress to provide obstacles to jump over on horse back is of course absurd. The familiar farming landscape we see in Britain today is the result of changes which occurred hundreds of years ago in the way farming was carried out. Got more to do with Jethro Tull than arrogant oafs trampling over over peoples farm land and killing their pet cats and dogs for fun.

    Report this comment

    LARSON.E. WHIPSNADE

    Tuesday, December 27, 2011

  • Sam:****" As the hunting community is the minority why do the antis think it right to dictate how we want to live our lives***" The answer is that you are doing something which is cruel and immoral , and as such the democratic majority has a right to vote that you stop. Dog and cock fighting were stopped for the same reason . The people who enjoyed these perverted pastimes complained just like you when they were banned.

    Report this comment

    LARSON.E. WHIPSNADE

    Tuesday, December 27, 2011

  • the anti's have always like to portray hunting as a toffs sport, when there are many ordinary folk follow the hunt on foot or in my case on a bike, I was brought up on a council estate as were many of my friends who support fox hunting

    Report this comment

    blister

    Thursday, December 29, 2011

  • I've a bit of respect for Mr Freeman, even though i'm not a Tory voter, but this madness. The fox-hunting debate is purely one about human morality and the joy one gets from killing an animal. It is nothing to do with "pest control" - foxes regulate their own numbers; neither is it about tradition - i see just as many people dressing up and riding horses doing what they have been legally allowed to do for the past few years. The only difference is that some of them think a day's riding, following some dogs, needs to be rounded off with another mammal being torn to shreds. If parliament repeals this law, then we might as well repeal the ones that stopped kids being sent up chimneys.

    Report this comment

    Tom Jeffries

    Monday, December 26, 2011

  • Thank you to Daisy Roots, I for one always enjoy your interesting (and agreeable) comments, unlike a lot of the no hopes that have crazy comments. To each hisher own.

    Report this comment

    Paul Platten

    Wednesday, December 28, 2011

  • Andy , people had the chance to vote on all the things you claim represent " the majority view " in the last election. They could have voted for a party that would bring back capital punishment and reduce immigration to zero ( the BNP ) , they did not. They could have voted to leave the EU and reduce overseas aid ( by voting UKIP ) , again they did not. So what you claim is the " majority view " turns out not to be the case when it matters.

    Report this comment

    LARSON.E. WHIPSNADE

    Tuesday, December 27, 2011

  • CJT or present incarnation-Jethro Tull= seed drill. Coke of Norfolk, Turnip Townsend-agrarian revolution improvers but also planters of woods and coverts, not just for timber but also for game as planted on most of the large Norfolk estates. The pastimes of the very rich really did shape the landscape. I don't care for hunting myself, many involved are utter tools-but have antis really seen that many foxes torn to pieces alive? Even a big old dog fox is not particularly large compared with a hound and I would have expected the first hound in to make a quick kill, even if the carcase is then torn by others. Deer hunting is a different matter. I still feel quite firmly that however principled some members of bodies like the LACS and the RSPCA may have been there was a strong political element to the ban and that many supporters of those organisations have a strange perspective on animal welfare. The irony is that as it stands the fox has still to endure the chase and then be shot at the end, which is gutless-it should have been a full ban on the chase or no ban at all. As for the cost of keeping a horse-there seems to be plenty of people in Norfolk who can afford to keep a horse on a scrap of mud. Why dont the welfare bodies concern themselves with the number of horses and ponies kept in bad conditions by fools? At least the people hunting look after their horses properly. Hunting live quarry is gone and it is probably for the best, even if foxes are still exterminated where they are pests it will not be in the face of Joe Public so he wont care. No doubt now the LaCS will turn their attention to shooting but none of the parties will dare back a ban on fishing or sort out the suffering caused by those keeping "pets".

    Report this comment

    Daisy Roots

    Thursday, December 29, 2011

  • What would Jesus do? I don't think this question has been answered to any degree of satisfaction.

    Report this comment

    Yahweh or the Highway

    Wednesday, December 28, 2011

  • I am saddened that the EDP chose to report this issue in such a clearly prejudiced and pro hunting manner. There was absolutely no balance in this article whatsoever. Sure foxes are a nuisance so shoot them.....don't chase them across the countryside in the hope of seeing them ripped to bits by dogs. Badger baiting, dog fighting, cock fighting etc. were all part of our history - so were ducking stools where ugly women were drowned because they might have been witches, back street abortionists, public hangings and so on. The argument that something has historical significance just doesn't wash.

    Report this comment

    Poves

    Tuesday, December 27, 2011

  • I find Mr Freeman's arguments bizarre to say the least. It seems to be summed up as "Its always gone on in Norfolk, the people who do it enjoy it and those who oppose it just don't understand." The same could be said of burglary and incest. All are illegal and long may they remain so.

    Report this comment

    Ne Absiste

    Tuesday, December 27, 2011

  • What would Jesus do ? Well i assume he would not be stupid enough to ask the same question five times.

    Report this comment

    LARSON.E. WHIPSNADE

    Wednesday, December 28, 2011

  • Open your eyes Townies-most of the woods, copses and wide grass rides you see in the countryside would not be there unless planted for game and riding by landowners in the past.

    Report this comment

    Daisy Roots

    Tuesday, December 27, 2011

  • Pro-hunters here can use all the patronising names that they like for the antis but just face the facts that hunting is barbaric. I grew up in Kent and saw foxes being ripped to pieces. When challenged, the huntsmenwomen were violent and arrogant. The police clearly don’t even make the pretence of upholding the law. This “sport” should remain banned and the vast majority of country folk should not be bullied and intimidated by these pompous few.

    Report this comment

    Sportswagon

    Wednesday, December 28, 2011

  • hunting is certainly no more barbaric than intensive animal rearing for our plates and no more cruel than Halal method of killing animals, we put rat poison down and rats die a long and painful death, hunting is quick and usually kills immediatly, foxes are a pest and need controlling and hunting is the most humane way of dealing with them, lets see the animal rights people demonstrating against Halal butchers rather than respectable Hunting groups

    Report this comment

    blister

    Thursday, December 29, 2011

  • So Mr Freeman believes that fox hunting should be allowed because it is entrenched in our local history and good for the economy.....maybe one could argue the same for the slave trade that made Bristol so wealthy?

    Report this comment

    Poves

    Tuesday, December 27, 2011

  • The hunts I have seen seem to do ok trailing and not hurting anything, riding out quite often. I can't say I could favour a repeal now and regard hare coursing as vile. A few points though-expecting the police to chase up people with a few terriers who chase rabbits or squirrels when they can't stem the tide of sheep rustling shows boss eyed priorities. Even hunting mice with more than one dog is illegal. Although not all landowners hunt and not all hunters own land much of the older farmed landscape, woods, copses and wide grassed rides are there because of shooting hunting and riding. And only a fool would say that the ban was anything else than New Labour sticking the boot into rural communites-there was a strong element of anti Conservative voter. And a huge degree of hypocrisy when there was no similar move to reduce the suffering caused to animals kept as pets from exotic birds and lizards and plain old rabbits all kept in cages to the huge number of dogs bred as pets and killed each year.Compared to these the number of foxes that were killed instantly by big old hounds was trifling.

    Report this comment

    Daisy Roots

    Monday, December 26, 2011

  • Just been reading daisy roots' comments stating copses and wide grass rides would not have been there if it was'nt for them being planted for game...it it also said pheasants would not be here if it was'nt for shooting purposes. It seems like a bit of god playing, raising a species just to destroy it...

    Report this comment

    smalltownboy

    Tuesday, December 27, 2011

  • Seem to me that what we have at the moment keeps both parties happy. The hunts still meet and their participants can still dress up and career around the countryside on their horses. The animal rights lot protect a few foxes from what I'm sure is a pretty miserable way to die.

    Report this comment

    Betty Swallocks

    Tuesday, December 27, 2011

  • "a 'nice' kill shot"? Just about sums up the attitude of some!

    Report this comment

    Thoreauwasright

    Friday, December 30, 2011

  • As the hunting community is the minority why do the antis think it right to dictate how we want to live our lives. We don't go fighting for new acts of parliament to stop you doing what you want so leave us alone to manage our lives and our countryside. I have seen first hand how hunting helps the local community and how they have a massive love for what they do and the place they live. What bugs me most is that the antis are ready to call hunting cruel when they have not found out the facts about why it's done and how it helps.

    Report this comment

    Sam

    Tuesday, December 27, 2011

  • As so many people want the majority view to prevail, can we also bring back hanging as a punishment, quit the EU and reduce immigration to the point where the population of UK decreases? Reduce overseas aid too whilst we are about it. There must be plenty of other things too where the majority view is ignored.

    Report this comment

    andy

    Tuesday, December 27, 2011

  • Larson, but they did vote for the Conservatives who said they would overturn the hunting ban! Who was it that got the most votesMPs last time? On that basis you have no grounds for wanting to keep the hunting ban. (I don't have a view on that subject at all, by the way)

    Report this comment

    andy

    Tuesday, December 27, 2011

  • sam likes the word "our". This is the nub. His world. His peoples` world. Smug, arrogant and largely achieved through inheritance. Three ways of getting wealth: inheritance, deviance or luck. Sorry, forgot theft, aka being a "businessman". Back to inheritance. So keep the nice bits of your world by creating the nasty bits you exploit for everybody else. You still won`t live forever.

    Report this comment

    Mad Brewer

    Tuesday, December 27, 2011

  • The suggestion that 'ordinary' folk are able to enjoy a hunt is interesting and worrying. One would like to think that hunt supporters would be content watching the hunt prior to the chase. However, if this is referring to the worrying and dangerous spectacle of a large group of people in their cars, 4x4's (not forgetting bikes) careering around narrow country lanes chasing the hunt then it is hardly something to brag about?

    Report this comment

    Douglas McCoy

    Thursday, December 29, 2011

  • Fox hunting has been debated, a law passed and upheld thus far for perfectly good reasons. Parliamentary time needs to be spent debating more pressing matters.

    Report this comment

    Gerri

    Monday, December 26, 2011

  • Sam, how can u be sooooo disingenuous. I grew up in Kent and saw foxes ripped to pieces by hounds whilst cheering huntsmenwomenlooked on. These so called civilised guardians of the countryside were arrogant and violent towards anyone against hunting and the police did nothing. This is very much a class pursuit and these law breakers should be pursued with the same zest that other law breakers are. How on earth can anyone get pleasure from this disgusting so-called sport unless u r brain dead or perverted? Do u support bear baiting too?

    Report this comment

    Sportswagon

    Tuesday, December 27, 2011

  • People seem to be labouring under the idea that shooting foxes is "Nicer" than hunting them with dogs. Yes it is, if you can guarantee a nice kill shot every time, but as with deer and other mammals hunted in this way, if your shot is not a good one, the animal can escape to die a long a painful death as the would slowly kills it. Neither sound very inviting to me.

    Report this comment

    DaveG

    Thursday, December 29, 2011

  • Daisy Roots - and your point is?

    Report this comment

    Thoreauwasright

    Tuesday, December 27, 2011

  • These huntsmenwomen thing the are so brave with their hounds chasing innocent foxes. They are like ,bullies who intimidate inoffensive people,they are also attack in packs. my Dad was in the Yorkshire Dragoons they fought on horseback in the North African Campaign WW2. "You may well be proud of the part your Regiment has played in our great victories out here,” wrote Field Marshal Alexander, “and I shall always feel very proud to have had the Yorkshire Dragoons under my command. My dad would never hurt any animals.

    Report this comment

    LFB

    Monday, December 26, 2011

  • To those who say fox hunting isn’t just for the rich are either deluded or lying. The average cost of livery for a horse is approximately £100 per week. Farriers costs, vets bills, and tack are all equally expensive. It also is hard to deny that the cost of transporting a horse around the countryside is cheap. Witness the number of expensive horse boxes and 4x4’s used to get horses to a hunt meeting. To suggest that fox hunting is a sport for anyone except the privileged few is to deny common sense. As to whether it is right for people who indulge in a minority sport to be allowed to dictate whether or not a law passed by the majority of the then MP’s is to be overturned is for their friends in Parliament, as plainly they do not accept the will of the majority of people in the UK.

    Report this comment

    Douglas McCoy

    Tuesday, December 27, 2011

  • So every time we get a new government we will try and revoke the laws set by previous ones. Its been banded since 2005 and there are still hunts going on so to say people are out of work because of this is total poppycock..!! Bungay hunt did not go ahead because the ground was to hard.. perhaps we should get the local MP's to sort out gritting by hand over the fields.. If it is that important to hunt then surely it could of gone ahead. With these said hunts breaking the law then we should support the RSPCA & Police in getting them prosecuted... We are happy for Norfolk Constabulary to plough money into other crime reduction..

    Report this comment

    marshall

    Monday, December 26, 2011

  • What would Jesus do? I don't think that question has been answered to any degree of satisfaction.

    Report this comment

    Yahweh or the Highway

    Wednesday, December 28, 2011

  • Moderator bias in operation

    Report this comment

    Daisy Roots

    Monday, December 26, 2011

  • Open your eyes Townies-most of the woods, copses and wide grass rides you see in the countryside would not be there unless planted for game and riding by landowners in the past. Whilst I would not support the re legalisation of hunting or the vile harecoursing-not all hunters are country people and not all country people are hunters-the hunting with dogs act is flawed. If you have two terriers which hunt and kill a mouse or a grey squirrel you could be prosecuted. Since the police can't stop the rise in sheep rustling I suggest they have better things to do than enforce the Act. And only a fool would think the ban was not political-pushed through when other more important things were neglected, it was a boot in the face of rural communities perceived as Tory voters by a Nu Labour lobbied by the RSPCA and eager for votes from their supporters. Rank hypocrisy all round-bunny huggers are still allowed to keep exotic animals and birds in cages and cats confined to high rise flats and dogs are bred for pets and slaughtered every year in numbers that make the numbers of foxes ( and indeed aged hounds) killed by hunts look trifling. Concern for animal welfare was not uppermost that's for sure.

    Report this comment

    Daisy Roots

    Tuesday, December 27, 2011

  • My point is you cant get a balanced but non bunny hug post past these mods

    Report this comment

    Daisy Roots

    Tuesday, December 27, 2011

  • What would Jesus do? I don't think this question has been answered to any degree of satisfaction.

    Report this comment

    Yahweh or the Highway

    Wednesday, December 28, 2011

  • And why are the moderators dumping dozens of anti posts. Scared of upsetting the landed gentry around here ?

    Report this comment

    LARSON.E. WHIPSNADE

    Tuesday, December 27, 2011

  • Sam - it is not the hunting brigades countryside, it is supposedly for all of us to enjoy, and I for one who live there prefer to do so without the cruelty and damage to land and animals caused by them!

    Report this comment

    Queenie

    Tuesday, December 27, 2011

  • What would Jesus do? I don't think this question has been answered to any degree of satisfaction.

    Report this comment

    Yahweh or the Highway

    Wednesday, December 28, 2011

The views expressed in the above comments do not necessarily reflect the views of this site

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