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Flooded Broads road leads to loss of business and safety concerns

PUBLISHED: 06:46 23 November 2017 | UPDATED: 20:23 23 November 2017

Business and residents are concerned about flooding along Ferry Road in Horning. Picture: CLAYTON WILLIAMS

Business and residents are concerned about flooding along Ferry Road in Horning. Picture: CLAYTON WILLIAMS

Archant

Regular flooding of a Broads village road near the River Bure has concerned business owners and residents who say it poses a danger and has cost thousands in lost revenue.

Business and residents are concerned about flooding along Ferry Road in Horning. Picture: CLAYTON WILLIAMS Business and residents are concerned about flooding along Ferry Road in Horning. Picture: CLAYTON WILLIAMS

Clayton Williams, the manager of King Line Cottages in Horning, said Ferry Road flooded on a regular basis and was often impassable to motor vehicles.

“It has been going on for quite some time now but seems to have been worse this year,” he said.

“The water is bubbling up from manholes and we’ve been told its river water but you can also see sewage coming out.”

Mr Williams said the issue had affected the holiday cottage business.

Business and residents are concerned about flooding along Ferry Road in Horning. Picture: ANDREW STONE Business and residents are concerned about flooding along Ferry Road in Horning. Picture: ANDREW STONE

“No one can drive through when its flooded,” he said.

Paul Rice, a North Norfolk councillor and chair of the Ferry Road Flood Forum said the road had flooded twice in the past two weeks.

He lodged a complaint with Anglian Water but said an employee from the company had told him there was nothing they could do as it was flood water.

“Anglian Water really need to solve this issue because there can be no further development until it’s sorted,” said Mr Rice.

Ferry Road Flood Forum chair Paul Rice. Picture: ANDREW STONE Ferry Road Flood Forum chair Paul Rice. Picture: ANDREW STONE

He said the flooded road posed a danger as it could hamper emergency vehicles needing to access the area.

“The short term solution is to have a pump available to clear water when it floods.

“The long term answer is to have a sustainable drainage system put in place.”

An Anglian Water spokesperson said the company has been working in Horning “for some time” to try and resolve the matter.

The Ferry Inn managing director Lyubo Dragoev. Picture: ANDREW STONE The Ferry Inn managing director Lyubo Dragoev. Picture: ANDREW STONE

“We do appreciate how inconvenient and upsetting flooding can be.

“Unfortunately because Ferry Road is below sea level the water table is very high naturally.

“Heavy rainfall, especially when it coincides with high tide means water from the surrounding Broads can quickly wash into and fill our sewers.”

The spokesperson said Anglian Water had invested £1m to survey nine kilometres of pipe, reline 1.5 kilometre long lengths of sewers and seal a number of manhole chambers to try and eliminate surface water getting into the system.

The Ferry Inn at Horning. Picture: SOPHIE WYLLIE The Ferry Inn at Horning. Picture: SOPHIE WYLLIE

“But we accept this has had limited impact.

“We will continue to work closely with the lead local flood authority, Norfolk County Council and our other drainage partners, including the district council and the Environment Agency.”

Floods cost Ferry Inn thousands in lost revenue

The Ferry Inn Horning has been affected by flooding along Ferry Road on numerous occasions over the years costing thousands of pounds in lost revenue.

Managing director Lyubo Dragoev said one of the worst times was in 2013 when the business had to close for four weeks.

He said: “The pub looked like it was sitting in a lake. We had building damage, food went off and we still had to pay wages.

“The loss to the business was about £20,000.”

He said they had since invested £70,000 in “reinstating” ground and car park levels.

“We’ve been in the same situation since, but for shorter periods. We have lost dozens of company cars and vehicles belonging to customers from water damage. I have personally lost three cars.”

He said the current flooding was a mixture of river and sewage water coming out of the drains.

“Every morning I come to work worrying if we will be able to open.”

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