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Majestic falcon which calls church home set for fruitful 2018

PUBLISHED: 09:00 01 January 2018 | UPDATED: 10:24 01 January 2018

The chairman of Waveney Bird Club hopes the Bungay falcon will find a mate in Spring 2018. Picture: Jon Evans

The chairman of Waveney Bird Club hopes the Bungay falcon will find a mate in Spring 2018. Picture: Jon Evans

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Spring 2018 should be the time for Bungay’s very own falcon to find a mate, according to the chairman of Waveney Bird Club.

The chairman of Waveney Bird Club hopes the Bungay falcon will find a mate in Spring 2018. Picture: Jon Evans The chairman of Waveney Bird Club hopes the Bungay falcon will find a mate in Spring 2018. Picture: Jon Evans

The female bird first took up residence on St Mary’s Church back in 2015 and soon made her intention to stay very clear.

As fascination and fondness for the peregrine grew within the town and beyond, a six-month community project took place last year to give her a comfy place to nest.

The projected resulted in the creation of a permanent nest box, which is now situated on the south west corner of the church.

And now, as she nears the age of three, the hope is that early 2018 is the time for her to find a mate and begin breeding.

The chairman of Waveney Bird Club hopes the Bungay falcon will find a mate in Spring 2018. Picture: Jon Evans The chairman of Waveney Bird Club hopes the Bungay falcon will find a mate in Spring 2018. Picture: Jon Evans

Steve Piotrowski, chairman of Waveney Bird Club, said: “The Bungay falcon is now two-years-old, but we don’t expect them to start breeding until they are three.

“She’s been spotted very recently and has had lots of interest in the box. Falcons usually show you where they want to breed, so that’s a very positive sign.

“Unlike falcons living in the countryside, who don’t usually breed until April, urban birds like the Bungay peregrine tend to breed around the end of March.”

The number of urban birds has increased dramatically over the last few years, mainly due to more significant protection in towns and villages.

The chairman of Waveney Bird Club hopes the Bungay falcon will find a mate in Spring 2018. Picture: Jon Evans The chairman of Waveney Bird Club hopes the Bungay falcon will find a mate in Spring 2018. Picture: Jon Evans

This has also seen a change in the balance of where Britain’s breeding birds reside, with England now boasting more than Scotland.

As for Bungay church’s high-flying resident, it had initially been hoped that she would mate with a male falcon residing at the wildlife-rich Flixton Pits, but unfortunately an accident prevented any immediate possibility of breeding.

“Sadly the male at Flixton fell off its perch and was subsequently taken to a vet, but his injuries meant that he then had to go to a bird of prey rehabilitation centre.

“However, in Suffolk we do have three peregrine falcons regularly bringing up chicks, including one on the maltings building opposite Asda in Lowestoft. We’re very hopeful that the Bungay falcon will be the fourth.”

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