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Elementary, Miss Newell... Forensic science lesson for King’s Lynn’s budding Sherlocks

17:27 19 March 2014

Pupils at Howards Junior School in Gaywood have has a forensic lecture, giving them an insight into techniques - Amber Bramham (8) with some skeleton remains. Picture: Matthew Usher.

Pupils at Howards Junior School in Gaywood have has a forensic lecture, giving them an insight into techniques - Amber Bramham (8) with some skeleton remains. Picture: Matthew Usher.

© Archant Norfolk 2014

Future criminologists took their first finger prints during a lesson given by two top scientists.

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Pupils at Howards Junior School in Gaywood have has a forensic lecture, giving them an insight into techniques - Ellie-Mae Kirby (10) with her fingerprint. Picture: Matthew Usher.Pupils at Howards Junior School in Gaywood have has a forensic lecture, giving them an insight into techniques - Ellie-Mae Kirby (10) with her fingerprint. Picture: Matthew Usher.

Pupils were also taught about the human skeleton, in a forensic science lesson at Howard Junior School in King’s Lynn.

The children were given a key ring so they could each keep a copy of their own finger print.

Headteacher Gregory Hill said: “It is fantastic. It will inspire pupils to go to university.”

Mr Hill added he hoped that a visit from a female scientist would encourage more girls to take an interest in the subject.

Pupils at Howards Junior School in Gaywood have has a forensic lecture, giving them an insight into techniques - Amber Bramham (8) with some skeleton remains. Picture: Matthew Usher.Pupils at Howards Junior School in Gaywood have has a forensic lecture, giving them an insight into techniques - Amber Bramham (8) with some skeleton remains. Picture: Matthew Usher.

Science teacher Georgia Newell contacted Lincoln University to arrange for the lecturers to come and visit the budding scientists.

Miss Newell said: “I had the idea to ask for some experts to come and talk to the children.

“As a former Lincoln graduate, I know how good their science department is, so I contacted them. The children can ask them all the questions.”

Dr Nicola Crewe, from Lincoln University, said: “Science underpins everything. A lot of people think it’s boring but science is fun.”

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