Poll: What do you think about today’s national teachers’ strike?

Official picket at Sprowston High School; Photo credit: Submitted. Official picket at Sprowston High School; Photo credit: Submitted.

Wednesday, March 26, 2014
12:02 PM

Dozens of schools across the region are closed or partially closed by today’s national teachers’ strike.

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The strike, by members of the National Union of Teachers (NUT), is over pay, pensions and conditions, and Norfolk teachers will hold a rally outside The Forum in Norwich at noon.

The Government has branded the strike as bad for children’s education and unpopular with parents.

Christine Blower, general secretary of the NUT, said: “Teachers deeply regret the disruption caused by this strike action to parents and teachers. The Government’s refusal, however, to engage to resolve the dispute means that we have no alternative other than to demonstrate the seriousness of our concerns.

“Teachers’ levels of workload are intolerable – the Government’s own survey, published last month, shows that primary school teachers work nearly 60 hours a week and secondary school teachers work nearly 56 hours a week. Two in five teachers are leaving the profession in the first five years of teaching as are many others. This is bad for children and bad for education.”

Official picket at Sprowston High School; Photo credit: Submitted.Official picket at Sprowston High School; Photo credit: Submitted.

A Department for Education spokesman said: “Parents will struggle to understand why the NUT is pressing ahead with strikes over the Government’s measures to let heads pay good teachers more.

“They called for talks to avoid industrial action, we agreed to their request, and talks have been taking place weekly.

“Despite this constructive engagement with their concerns, the NUT is taking action that will disrupt parents’ lives, hold back children’s education and damage the reputation of the profession.”

To find out how your local school is affected, see the list below.

• Are you a parent affected by the strike, or a teacher who is on strike? Tell us what you think below, or email martin.george@archant.co.uk.

As of 9.15am today (Wednesday) 77 schools in Norfolk were closed or partially closed. They are:

Angel Road Infant School (NR3 3HR) - Partial closure Miss F Reception class and Mrs A Y1 class are the only classes open

Angel Road Junior School (NR3 3HS) - Partial closure due to industrial action 6B, 6R, 6W, 5MC and 4K remain open

Archbishop Sancroft CE High School (IP20 9DD) - The school is open for Year 11 only.

Attleborough Junior School (NR17 2NA) - Closed due to industrial action, open as usual tomorrow

Avenue Junior School (NR2 3HP) -

Bacton Community Primary School (NR12 0EY) - The school is partially closed due to strike action with only the Key stage 2 class open.

Barnham Broom CE VA Primary School (NR9 4BU) - Strike action

Bawdeswell Community Primary School (NR20 4RR) - Woodlands 2, Penguins and Dolphins Classes closed due to NUT Strike Action. Woodlands 1 is open as usual.

Bignold Primary School (NR2 2SP) - Closed due to industrial action.

Bluebell Primary School (NR4 7DS) - School is closed due to industrial action.

Browick Road Infant School (NR18 0QW) - School closed due to industrial action.

Brundall School (NR13 5JX) - Due to Industrial action the school will be open to only three classes: Peacocks Year 1 Kookaburras Year 2 Owls Year 5. Penguins, Toucans, Puffins, Orioles and Dodos will not be open and we ask parents with children in those classes to make alternative arrangements for your child.

Bunwell Primary School (NR16 1SN) - The school will have insufficient teachers due to the industrial action due to take place on this day

Caston CE VA Primary School (NR17 1DD) - School closed due to industrial action. There will be insufficient teaching staff in school to safely allow the school to be open for children.

Cavell Primary & Nursery School (NR1 2LR) - Partial closure- Nursery, Y1,Yr2,Yr3,Yr4-other classes open as usual

Cecil Gowing Infant School (NR7 8NZ) - Cecil Gowing Infant School will be closed Wednesday 26th March owing to teacher strike action. SOS club and Once Upon A Time Nursery will remain open.

Chapel Road School (NR17 2DS) - Closed to pupils as unable to operate safely and effectively due to reduced number in teaching staff who are following action called by their Union. School open to all staff not taking action.

Colman Infant School (NR4 7AW) -

Colman Junior School (NR4 7AU) - NUT Industrial Action

Coltishall Primary School (NR12 7HA) - Partial closure due to NUT Strike Action. Chestnut (Year 4) and Oak (Year 5) classes open as normal. Breakfast Club, After School Club and WildLife club running as normal.

Corpusty Primary School (NR11 6QG) - Due to NUT strike action.

Dickleburgh CE VC Primary School (IP21 4NL) - NUT strike action - the school will be partially closed. No school at all for classes 2,3 and 4. Class5 are expected to attend from 8.45 - 1.15 and Class1 should be in school from 11.00 until 3.30. There are limited breakfast and after school facilities.

Diss High School (Academy) (IP22 4DH) - The school is open to Year 11 and Sixth Formers for independent private study.

Diss Infants & Nursery School With Children’s Centre (IP22 4PU) - Strike action. Partial closure - just one class.

Downham Market Academy (PE38 9LL) - Partial closure to year 7,8 and 9 due to industrial action by NUT members. Students in Years 10 and 11 and Sixth Form students should attend as normal.

Drayton CE VC Junior School (NR8 6EF) - Partial closure for pupils in 3L and 4M. School is open for all other classes.

Drayton Community Infant School (NR8 6EP) - The school will be closed due to the majority of teaching staff striking.

Dussindale Primary School (NR7 0US) - Industrial action

Fairstead Community Primary & Nursery School (PE30 4RR) - Closed due to strike action.

Falcon Junior School (NR7 8NT) - Partial closure due to industrial action. School is open to Y6 and Y3 pupils only

Firside Junior School (NR6 5NF) - Partial closure due to NUT national day of action (strike). Letter already sent home details classes unaffected by the action.

Garboldisham CE VC Primary School (IP22 2SE) - Only year 3/4 class closed, rest of school OPEN. Industrial action.

Garrick Green Infants School (NR6 7AL) -

Gooderstone CE VA Primary School (PE33 9BP) -

Harleston CE VA Primary School (IP20 9HG) - NUT Strike action means we will be closed for pupils in Year 3,4,5 and 6

Hempnall Primary School (NR15 2AD) - School partially closed. Oak Class and Willow Class closed. Rowan and Conifer Open.

Henderson Green Primary School (NR5 8DZ) - PARTIAL CLOSURE. Due to strike action school will be closed for children in Reception and Key Stage 1 ONLY (Willow class, Rowan class and Hazel class). Children in Key Stage 2 should come to school as normal (Beech, Aspen and Elm class).

Hevingham Primary School (NR10 5NH) - Due to the national teachers strike we are unable to maintain adequate levels of health and safety.

Highgate Infant School (PE30 2PS) - Year 2 only closed

Hilgay Village VC Primary School (PE38 0JL) - Partial closure alpha class closed all day, beta closed am only children to come in at 12pm -gamma class open all day.

Hillside Avenue Primary & Nursery School (NR7 0QW) - Due to the NUT teachers strike, the school will be partially closed.

Hobart High School (Academy) (NR14 6JU) - Due to the NUT strike action we will be open to Years 10 and 11 only. The PE exam will run as planned. We will be closed to all students in Years 7, 8 and 9.

Kinsale Junior School (NR6 5SG) - Partial closure due to NUT strike action, classes 3R and 5C are closed.

Lionwood Junior School (NR1 4HT) - Industrial Action

Litcham School (PE32 2NS) - Partial closure - industrial action. Primary phase (Years R to 6) - OPEN. Secondary Phase Years 7 to 9 CLOSED. Secondary Phase Years 10 and 11 - OPEN

Loddon Infant & Nursery School (NR14 6JX) - School closed for Woodpeckers, Robins and Peregrines classes due to strike action. Other classes open as usual.

Marsham Primary School (NR10 5AE) - Due to the national teachers strike we are unable to maintain adequate health and safety levels for our pupils.

Mattishall Primary School (NR20 3AA) - Industrial Action.

Mulbarton Junior School (NR14 8JG) - Partial closure due to industrial action

Mundesley Junior School (NR11 8LE) - The school is closed to children in all classes, other than Boudicca class, due to industrial action by the NUT. Children in Boudicca class should attend as normal.

Nightingale First School (NR8 6LA) - Nightingale is partially closed due to the NUT strike. Please see school website for information on individual classes. www.nightingale.norfolk.sch.uk

North Walsham Infant School & Nursery (NR28 9HG) - Panda and Owl Classes are closed due to strike action. Apologies for the inconvenience caused.

Notre Dame High School (Academy) (NR1 3PB) - Due to Industrial Action the school is closed to students in Y7-11 only, the VI Form is open as normal

Old Buckenham High School (NR17 1RL) - Partial school closure due to NUT strike action (closed to years 7, 8, 9 & 10 - open for Year 11s to do supervised independent study).

Queensway Infant School & Nursery (IP24 3DR) - Partial closure. Nursery, class 2 and class 5 will be closed due to industrial action. All other classes are open.

Recreation Road Infant School (NR2 3PA) -

Reffley Community School & Nursery (PE30 3SF) -

Sidestrand Hall School (NR27 0NH) -

Southery Primary School (PE38 0PA) - School closed due to NUT industrial action. Sorry

Sparhawk Infant School & Nursery (NR7 8BU) - School closed due to industrial action.

Sprowston Community High School (NR7 8NE) - Strike action by NUT: School open for Years 11, 12 and 13 students and not other year groups. Staff to follow arrangements for the day.

St. Francis Of Assisi Catholic Primary School (NR2 3QB) - Closed to pupils as unable to operate safely and effectively due to reduced number in teaching staff who are following action called by their Union.

St. Mary’s RC VA Primary & Nursery School (NR31 6QY) - Due to the National Union of Teachers one-day industrial action, the school is closed today for: Nursery class, Reception class and Y4. All other classes will be open to their children as usual.

St. Nicholas Ce Va Priory Junior School (NR30 1NL) - Partial closure due to industrial action. Classes 3BW, 3SW, 3F, 4B, 4S, 5M and 5S are closed. Classes 4K, 5D, 5Y, 6A, 6F, 6L and 6R are open.

Stradbroke Community Primary School (NR31 6LZ) - Partial closure. Please see school website or contact school for further details.

Surlingham Community Primary School (NR14 7DQ) -

Swaffham CE VC Infant School (PE37 7RF) - Teacher’s strike

Taverham High School (Academy) (NR8 6HP) - We regret that the school will be closed to students in Years 7-10 due to national strike action by the NUT. School open as usual to all students in Years 11-13. Please check our website for more details.

Taverham VC Junior School (NR8 6SX) - Partial closure due to NUT strike action. The school will be open for the following classes only: 3F (Malta); 3N (Netherlands); 4L (Morocco); 4P (Kenya) and 5PH (Argentina). Y6 residential trip will go ahead as planned.

The Hewett School (NR1 2PL) - Main school closure for Years 7-11 due to strike action

The Parkside School (NR2 3JA) - Squirrel, Ladybird, Beech and Holly Classes will be closed for the day. All other classes will attend school as normal.

Thurlton Primary School (NR14 6RN) - School closed due to the teacher’s strike.

Valley Primary School (NR5 8XZ) - Due to industrial action by members of the NUT, Valley Primary School will only be open to the pupils in reception and year 4

Wensum Junior School (NR2 4HB) - Partial closure

West Earlham Infant School (NR5 8HT) - Closed to Reception-Year 2 due to strike action. Nursery open as usual. Some Adult learning still running.

West Winch Primary School (PE33 0LA) - School is closed today due to strike action by members of the NUT.

White Woman Lane Junior School (NR6 7JA) - Due to industrial action school is closed for Years 3,4 and 5. School is OPEN for Year 6 pupils.

Schools in Suffolk:

Crowfoot CP School, Beccles, partially open

Sir John Leman High School, Beccles, partially open

St Benet’s Catholic Primary School, Beccles, partially open

The Glade CP School, Brandon, partially open

St Edmund’s Catholic Primary School, Bungay, partially open

Meadow CP School, Lowestoft, partially open

Poplars CP School, Lowestoft, partially open

Roman Hill Primary School, Lowestoft, partially open

The Ashley School Academy Trust, Lowestoft, closed

The Benjamin Britten High School, Lowestoft, partially open

107 comments

  • Children leave education without basic skills because their parents haven't taught them the even more basic skills of respecting and listening to those who are there to teach you.

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    NigelS

    Wednesday, March 26, 2014

  • Best paid part time job in the country

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    blister

    Wednesday, March 26, 2014

  • Patrick... "And is it right that there was a 90% majority in favour of striking - 90% of a 40% turnout. Not a majority," Well it may be news, but most governments have been voted in on much, much less ! And teaching Is still a vocation despite your view. As for conditions of service. I am certain I would not want my children taught by a 68 year old burned out teacher any more than I would want a 68 year old fireman having to deal with a fire or major incident. No disrespect but that is the reality of what could happen. Any way let the younger people have the jobs.

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    Responsible parent

    Wednesday, March 26, 2014

  • I was trying to say to Pipps that a lot of us are concerned about teaching systems in the countycountry and agreeing with Carborundum saying "children still leave school unable to read write, spell, use grammar, have a work ethic or be fit for further education or the workplace." Now is that value for money?

    Report this comment

    Patrick

    Wednesday, March 26, 2014

  • "...Nice picture at the beginning of the teaching reprobates at Sprowston. How about sacking this rubbish as we now know who they are....". Get a job instead of leaving this sort of infantile abuse .

    Report this comment

    LARSON.E. WHIPSNADE

    Wednesday, March 26, 2014

  • It the Leftwing N.U.T who calls these strikes,there are other teaching unions who don't.

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    Albert Cooper

    Wednesday, March 26, 2014

  • Responsible Parent: now I feel you are being silly. If you can't stand the pressures then maybe it is a good idea to hand over to someone younger or who can deal with the strain. I don't think that there was any suggestion that you didn't understand the pressures of teaching. All jobs have pressures and it is how you handle them and cope with them that says whether you crack or not. I think that maybe you have put forward a good argument for children to be taught by a 68 year-old teacher with stamina rather than by a 57 year-old without. This is an open forum, I think, so there is no question of whether you 'need' my comments or not - please allow me an opinion although it doesn't follow the union diktats. I hope too, that in the light of day and after a good night's sleep you will realise that your remarks to Oldperson are rude and unfair - don't tell me that you haven't seen that repeated postings can happen on here even though someone types it and submits it just once! Carborundum was right.

    Report this comment

    Patrick

    Thursday, March 27, 2014

  • Its so easy, isnt it, to trot out the lazy, worn out argument about "get a real job" , "long holidays" and and "useless teachers". It is a very real and tough job- I'd like to see these who claim otherwise prepare a lesson plan, go into a classroom and try teaching AND holding the attention of 30+ kids, some of whom are not interested and very disruptive and (unlike previous generations) have little respect for teachers. The hours worked are, spread over a year, much the same as a job with regular hours and holidays. I'm a civil engineer- no way would i do a teaching job- one of the most thankless jobs there is as proven by the ill-informed remarks below.

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    Stephen Strange

    Wednesday, March 26, 2014

  • If you think teachers get the same holidays as the kids you're ill informed (if informed at all).

    Report this comment

    KeithS

    Wednesday, March 26, 2014

  • positive and well thought out comment addressed to Stephen Strange

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    Jan Sweet

    Wednesday, March 26, 2014

  • Valpy Word, I'd be happy to hear how you'd suggest making an impact. I've tried writing to my MP and Mr Gove, unfortunately both provided fruitless responses. I've signed petitions and encouraged others to do the same - they've so far been ignored. My union has attempted talks with the government but after 3 years we've made limited progress - am I missing something? JEN - perhaps you don't have children in the education system at the moment. If you do, you should be more worried about their experience and the government wants it that you seem to be at the moment. I think I made it clear in my first post - this isn't me whinging about how much I get paid but the effects the current government's changes are having on teachers as individuals and the far reaching consequences they have on the bigger picture. But well done for working weekends - you should have been a teacher.

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    Pipps

    Wednesday, March 26, 2014

  • Pipps, ok so you are a teacher. I had to work 10 hr days, 5 days a week, and then another job often Saturdays and Sundays, for months on end to earn less than the average teachers pay. It is about time teachers stopped complaining as with good pay and very generous holidays, I only get 4 weeks each year, many are in a very good job.

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    JEN

    Wednesday, March 26, 2014

  • Same old stuff being trotted out here! What's this about 'school closed because of industrial action'? A strike is industrial INACTION. Teaching used to be a vocation, a 'caring' professionjob in the sense that teachers used to care about those in their charge: now it is mostly just a 'job' - do it for the money, job done. And is it right that there was a 90% majority in favour of striking - 90% of a 40% turnout. Not a majority, that's the tail wagging the dog. Go back to work and get on with it. As NJ says, let them pay a fine for depriving each child of education today ..

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    Patrick

    Wednesday, March 26, 2014

  • Pipps, I can appreciate the conundrum you face, I really can and the frustration you feel at not being listened to resonates with me too. You've clearly looked into numerous avenues and haven't taken the decision to strike lightly. However, while it might raise public awareness of the problems you cite, I'm afraid that rather than raise additional support for your standpoint, for many the reasons for your strike will be overlooked because of the inconvenience it has caused them. Add to that people's obvious frustrations with policies such as the holiday fines and reason get's lost in the ether.

    Report this comment

    Valpy Word

    Wednesday, March 26, 2014

  • “Teachers’ levels of workload are intolerable –the Government’s own survey, published last month, shows that primary school teachers work nearly 60 hours a week and secondary school teachers work nearly 56 hours a week. Same old mantra, coming from the poor "opressed" useless teachers. Get a job in the real world, then you will see what "workload is intolerable" really means without the holidays.

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    "V"

    Wednesday, March 26, 2014

  • When the level of comment on here comes down to personal insults on all sides it does not give a good example of democratic debate. Nor does it give a good impression of yourselves or a good example to the young people who are at the heart of this matter.

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    PDH

    Thursday, March 27, 2014

  • Larceny baby! Still using capitals I see....... Only one user name I'm afraid, and definition of a 'troll'? apparently someone who has an opposite point of view. Most people can't afford to strike for better conditions-they just have to get on with it. Of course if you are a teacher, then your little tantrums reach a wider audience because of the disruption to 'working' parent's lives. I didn't coin the offending phrase by the way.

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    backwoodsman

    Thursday, March 27, 2014

  • Well, responsible parent, I think it says it all that after 36 years in education you are unable to spell "insinuate".

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    Oldperson

    Wednesday, March 26, 2014

  • Well looking at the pictures, at least one of them can afford a big new powerful motor bike! Shame about the size of their flags – still they have nothing to shout about, so tiny is probably better in this case.

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    Norfolk John

    Wednesday, March 26, 2014

  • larson.e.whateveryournameis – I don’t know who you think I am but whoever it is, I am not him. I have one account on here and I am certainly no troll.

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    Norfolk John

    Wednesday, March 26, 2014

  • Will the registers be marked as unauthorised absence?

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    expat

    Wednesday, March 26, 2014

  • How lovely to see such well written, grammatically correct comments from those of you who attended school regularly. Well done to your teachers!

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    They're there

    Wednesday, March 26, 2014

  • Once you have completed your initial teacher training (ITT) and achieved qualified teacher status (QTS), you can expect to start as a newly qualified teacher (NQT) in England and Wales on a minimum of £21,804 a year (or £27,270 if you work in inner London). Main pay ranges, including NQTs: •London fringe: £22,853 to £32,914 •Outer London: £25,369 to £35,468 •Inner London: £27,270 to £36,751 •Rest of England and Wales: £21,804 to £31,868 In addition to your basic salary, you will also receive a range of benefits, including: •teaching and learning responsibility (TLR) payments – additional money if you take on additional responsibilities •teachers' pension – the second largest public sector pension scheme in the country •holidays – more days than many people in other professions, though teachers work for 195 days per year in school, and do some work during their holidays

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    turnover

    Wednesday, March 26, 2014

  • I'm sure that the underpaid and overworked workers with no pensions who made their clothes, picked the veg and butchered their chicken for dinner, served them in the shop and made the cheap NUT flags are all in full support for this strike. Even myself as an NHS worker myself I would have to work a 62 hour week for a WHOLE 52 weeks of the year just to get the salary of a teacher with the equivalent experience and qualifications as me.

    Report this comment

    Panda

    Wednesday, March 26, 2014

  • samphirelover: dont assume all teachers go straight into the profession from university. There are two in my family who worked 20 years in the "real world" before becoming teachers in their 40s. They do their job because they love it and the subjects they teach; want kids to learn and excel.

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    Stephen Strange

    Wednesday, March 26, 2014

  • Good morning. And in the light of morning I notice that my last posting has appeared twice. Please note - I did not submit it twice.

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    Patrick

    Thursday, March 27, 2014

  • I feel that it is totally unacceptable for schools to be fullypartially closed due to this strike action and affecting childrens education. My daughter is off today because her school Sprowston High is partially closed and her year being judged as one that can suffer. Why do teachers think they are special cases, everybody has suffered over recent years due to the recession affecting pay and pensions and reduction in living standards. But that is the way things are now, and majority of working people have accepted and adapted to the way things are now. Strike action is not going to change anything, teachers are well rewarded for the hours they work.

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    norfolko

    Wednesday, March 26, 2014

  • Very commendable Pipps. How is my children being at home and me having to take time off work helping you achieve any of that?

    Report this comment

    Valpy Word

    Wednesday, March 26, 2014

  • Get back to work you whingeing lot. What sort of example does a group of individuals standing outside a school gate with pathetic placards show to the pupils that you'll presumably be expecting respect from in a classroom tomorrow? Learn to make your point in this modern day and age in a more constructive manner - and learn to count: 90% of a 40% turnout is barely more than a third of your total number, so why go ahead with a strike in the first place? Shape up or get out!

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    Honest Injun

    Wednesday, March 26, 2014

  • Why if it isn't me old pal Larson E. Whipsonade. Up to your old slanderous tricks again I see. Teachers going on strike is bull. What example does it set? When students don't like a school policy can they go on strike?

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    Z:)

    Friday, March 28, 2014

  • No sympathy, no support, bad example to students. But at least they have saved the taxpayer a lot of money by losing a days pay today, so I thank them for that. Striking does'nt work anymore, look what happened at grangemouth.

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    "Bin here all me life"

    Wednesday, March 26, 2014

  • Well, responsible parent, I think it says it all that after 36 years in education you are unable to spell "insinuate".

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    Oldperson

    Wednesday, March 26, 2014

  • Pips I agree with you about these points, so why are you not striking for the reasons you outlined. You omitted that you were also striking for more pay and lower pension age than the rest of the country. Why is it then that the teachers in my area retire at 60, then come back as supply teachers for the next 5 years at £100 plus a day, do you not think that people such as careers and labourers want to work until they are 68, no and they won't get a nice pension at the end of it and only have 4 weeks holiday a year. If you feel the pressure of the job too much I suggest you leave and make way for others who would relish the opportunity to work in your industry. Good luck finding a job with the benefits you currently get. As pointed out if you drop the pensions and pay, and were really striking for the benefit of our children we would be behind you all the way.

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    Kc1

    Wednesday, March 26, 2014

  • Responsible Parent: now I feel you are being silly. If you can't stand the pressures then maybe it is a good idea to hand over to someone younger or who can deal with the strain. I don't think that there was any suggestion that you didn't understand the pressures of teaching. All jobs have pressures and it is how you handle them and cope with them that says whether you crack or not. I think that maybe you have put forward a good argument for children to be taught by a 68 year-old teacher with stamina rather than by a 57 year-old without. This is an open forum, I think, so there is no question of whether you 'need' my comments or not - please allow me an opinion although it doesn't follow the union diktats. I hope too, that in the light of day and after a good night's sleep you will realise that your remarks to Oldperson are rude and unfair - don't tell me that you haven't seen that repeated postings can happen on here even though someone types it and submits it just once! Carborundum was right.

    Report this comment

    Patrick

    Wednesday, March 26, 2014

  • How much is a teacher worth is the main question and the answer is what ever they are prepared to take to accept the job, as I understand it they have a contract with terms and conditions same as most people if working excessive hours and during holiday periods breaches the contract and you are not being paid any extra then refuse to do it stop going baa and stand up for yourselves if they sack you sue them for unfair dismissal .

    Report this comment

    trev57

    Wednesday, March 26, 2014

  • Those who are members of a profession have achieved qualifications to become members of that profession. There is the implication that this is a job for life, in the sense of being one’s life’s work. In those professions related to religion it is referred to as a calling. In medical professions it is sometimes referred to as a vocation. The professions can be divided into the “learned” professions and the “caring” professions. For example if someone collapses in the street we might expect a lawyer to “pass by on the other side”, but not a physician. Teachers are both a learned and caring profession “in loco parentis”. Members of a profession are expected to maintain certain standards, and receive respect and a commensurate remuneration. Now we have the catch. If professionals are paid from the public purse the government expects the maximum performance with the minimum expenditure. Most non-professional workers consider they have the right to withdraw their labour if pay and conditions of employment do not match up. Striking is unprofessional. The NUT action therefore removes teachers from the ranks of the professionals. What is the solution? When presented with a similar conundrum I took early retirement and left my profession. This strike will achieve nothing, except to downgrade teachers.

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    The Fortean

    Wednesday, March 26, 2014

  • When teachers succeed in teaching children to read and write properly and understand basic maths, I might have more sympathy. Until then, get on with your job.

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    The man on the Clapham Omnibus

    Thursday, March 27, 2014

  • I'm sure that the underpaid and overworked workers with no pensions who made their clothes, picked the veg and butchered their chicken for dinner, served them in the shop and made the cheap NUT flags are all in full support for this strike. Even myself as an NHS worker myself I would have to work a 62 hour week for a WHOLE 52 weeks of the year just to get the salary of a teacher with the equivalent experience and qualifications as me.

    Report this comment

    Panda

    Wednesday, March 26, 2014

  • Well, responsible parent, I think it says it all that after 36 years in education you are unable to spell "insinuate".

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    Oldperson

    Wednesday, March 26, 2014

  • Teaching is a highly stressful job bedevilled by constant government interference,many teachers do not live long after retirement if they get that far because they are completely burnt out! Those who are under the impression that it is a cushy option have never experienced it! My honest advice to anybody considering a career in teaching is to forget it if you want a long reasonably stress free existence!.

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    Harry Rabinowitz

    Wednesday, March 26, 2014

  • Wish I had their very generous pension that is actually paid for by much lower paid people in the private sector. It is one of the many financial benefits for what is basically a part time job

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    blister

    Wednesday, March 26, 2014

  • I was trying to say to Pipps that a lot of us are concerned about teaching systems in the countycountry and agreeing with Carborundum saying "children still leave school unable to read write, spell, use grammar, have a work ethic or be fit for further education or the workplace." Now is that value for money?

    Report this comment

    Patrick

    Wednesday, March 26, 2014

  • "V", perhaps if you had paid a bit more attention to your teachers, you wouldn't be coming across on here as such an ignorant troll. "Teachers are just a load of self important rubbish, who should be sacked. " - so this is your intelligent answer to the crisis in the education sector is it? And what should all the teachers be replaced with? Sometimes it might be best if you stayed under your rock, and not crawl out to spout garbage on subjects you clearly know nothing about.

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    Tea&Biscuits

    Wednesday, March 26, 2014

  • Patrick, how does your concern of the education system manifest itself? By that I mean what steps have you taken to try to make a positive change? And don't worry norfolk John, I have a rubbish car AND a small flag- I know my place.

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    Pipps

    Wednesday, March 26, 2014

  • Why is is that people take jobs on, knowing the conditions, the hours of work, and their rate of pay, then demand more! This is the real world, if you want more pay, different conditions, or shorter hours, then do as the rest of us and get trainedqualified and leave to better yourself!

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    Marlin

    Wednesday, March 26, 2014

  • I might well have missed the following point, so apologies if its been mentioned. If a child is taken off school for a holiday, the parents are fined. If a teacher takes a day off to strike, is heshe fined??

    Report this comment

    Beezageoff

    Wednesday, March 26, 2014

  • Larson E. Whipsnade whilst I do not disagree with you about people who may be using multiple user names and I think that it is highly possible that it is the case, I think you need to provide the appropriate person at Archant with the evidence to back up your statement so that they can investigate and hopefully remove anyone who is misusing the service they provide. I also agree that a lot of the posts on here simply seem to be from people who get pleasure from criticizing others and posting negative comments. This comes from all sides of the debate and this is on all sides of the argument. I think Archant need to sort out what they do and don't allow on here rather than banning some comments for no apparent reason. In my personal opinion It is always better for people to include something positive in their posts even if they disagree with the thrust of the debate. It is also very important for people to explain their opinions with appropriate and reasonable language rather than a lot of the personal insults than I saw on this thread yesterday. How can we expect the future of society to learn from us when we behave in the way some of the commentators behave on here? Whether people like it or not we live in society and in my opinion we should make the best we can of it.

    Report this comment

    PDH

    Thursday, March 27, 2014

  • It is a profession they studied for because they wanted to do the job, they should now just get on and do it and think themselves lucky they have a job. It is a well paid job with many holidays (yes, o.k. we know they do do some work during that time), and a good pension even though they seem to think it isn't. They bleat on about the children having holidays out of term time when it's cheaper for the parents to take them (and children would still be learning about things even then), and now they do this, think its a fine example to be setting the pupils!

    Report this comment

    Lynda

    Wednesday, March 26, 2014

  • ' we are all in it together'. Apparently that does not apply to teachers and politicians . I agree with previous comment I would not be a teacher for all tea in china ,but those that are chose that profession .like it or lump it

    Report this comment

    Reader

    Wednesday, March 26, 2014

  • Well hello there EDP - two postings I have made and they don't appear anywhere as far as I can see. I think it was spelt correctly, grammar was ok, made a point or two and it was polite.

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    Patrick

    Wednesday, March 26, 2014

  • Those who can, do. Those who can't, teach. Those who can't teach, teach PE. The weather is getting warmer, nearly time to get the shorts on and play some tennis with the kids and do some cricket umpiring. Oh, and then recover with 6 weeks holiday of course. That and the 45k more than makes up for the endless hours of GCSE and A Level coursework marking! Anyone got any ideas how I can prevent my 't-shirt tan'? Factor 30 just doesn't do it these days.

    Report this comment

    They're there

    Thursday, March 27, 2014

  • "...What do you think about today’s national teachers’ strike?...". A pointless question Archant unless you limit people to one login account.....as it is you just invite a virtual one man troll avalanche.

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    LARSON.E. WHIPSNADE

    Wednesday, March 26, 2014

  • Hi, am i able to fine my daughters school for being closed today.

    Report this comment

    suchfun

    Wednesday, March 26, 2014

  • Valpy Word, I'd be happy to hear how you'd suggest making an impact. I've tried writing to my MP and Mr Gove, unfortunately both provided fruitless responses. I've signed petitions and encouraged others to do the same - they've so far been ignored. My union has attempted talks with the government but after 3 years we've made limited progress - am I missing something? JEN - perhaps you don't have children in the education system at the moment. If you do, you should be more worried about their experience and the government wants it that you seem to be at the moment. I think I made it clear in my first post - this isn't me whinging about how much I get paid but the effects the current government's changes are having on teachers as individuals and the far reaching consequences they have on the bigger picture. But well done for working weekends - you should have been a teacher.

    Report this comment

    Pipps

    Wednesday, March 26, 2014

  • Responsible Parent: sorry, I thought that the unions were strong on democracy and a proper vote - or is that democracy when the vote goes the 'right way'? I'm glad you think teaching is a vocation - you may be in a minority there. Why do you assume that someone is 'burnt out' at 68? Are you saying a 20-something just qualified youngster is by definition a better teacher? A discriminatory remark - if you think that experience counts for nothing. As to 'reality', that is nonsense, it's not a fair comparison. Pipps: I have always supported teachers by supporting my children, but have never considered the destructive action that is going on strike - in my view that is negative, selfish and counter-productive. There is so much to say but teachers are reactionary and don't listen.

    Report this comment

    Patrick

    Wednesday, March 26, 2014

  • Looks like the local 'Con club' bar flies have been learning how to use the internet today...

    Report this comment

    Andrew Shields

    Wednesday, March 26, 2014

  • Those who can, do. Those who can't, teach. Those who can't teach, teach PE. The weather is getting warmer, nearly time to get the shorts on and play some tennis with the kids and do some cricket umpiring. Oh, and then recover with 6 weeks holiday of course. That and the 45k more than makes up for the endless hours of GCSE and A Level coursework marking! Anyone got any ideas how I can prevent my 't-shirt tan'? Factor 30 just doesn't do it these days.

    Report this comment

    They're there

    Thursday, March 27, 2014

  • I am a teacher and have been for 10 years. I am on strike. Two weeks ago, we put on a production at our school, I worked from 8am until 10.30pm for 6 days straight, I received no over time, my only payment was the children saying thank you at the end of the night. I am not asking for applause myself, nor any recognition but please do not insult my profession by saying I'm in it for the money. I strike because I am worried about the education system as a teacher and a mother. I do not want my children educated in a system where their attainment levels are more important than their names. I do not want them educated in a system where achievement is only recognised if it falls in A-C. I do not want my children educated in a system blocked up by an ageing teacher population forced to work until 68 with no room for new talent and fresh ideas. I do not want my children educated by teachers so consumed by their workload that they have no energy or enthusiasm to do what they're good at; teaching. I do not want this for my children and I do not want it for yours and this is why I strike.

    Report this comment

    Pipps

    Wednesday, March 26, 2014

  • In my day the only strike you'd get from a teacher was a clip round the ear 'ole or a wooden board rubber chucked at your head. I must agree with all those attacking teachers who have got lazier and lazier over the years - when they're not strike, they're on holiday or complaining about something or other. They don't seem to realise how easy they have it - like everyone else here I too know what I'm talking about - fifty years ago I too went to school and then thirty years ago I had kids at school. Teachers just don't earn respect any more - and if they can't control the thirty odd (sometimes very odd) kids in their class, how are the parents supposed to? I'm sure that V, Norfolk John, sweet Cheeks, Marlin etc etc could show them just how easy a job it is. I know I would have jumped at the chance of such an easy stress-free 9-3 job with 12 weeks holiday - if I'd only had the luck.

    Report this comment

    Honkytonk

    Wednesday, March 26, 2014

  • Those who can, do. Those who can't, teach. Those who can't teach, teach PE. The weather is getting warmer, nearly time to get the shorts on and play some tennis with the kids and do some cricket umpiring. Oh, and then recover with 6 weeks holiday of course. That and the 45k more than makes up for the endless hours of GCSE and A Level coursework marking! Anyone got any ideas how I can prevent my 't-shirt tan'? Factor 30 just doesn't do it these days.

    Report this comment

    They're there

    Thursday, March 27, 2014

  • Teaching used to be a vocation now for many it is just a job. The teachers are just alienating themselves. No good ever comes of striking.

    Report this comment

    BG

    Wednesday, March 26, 2014

  • I am a teacher and have been for 10 years. I am on strike. Two weeks ago, we put on a production at our school, I worked from 8am until 10.30pm for 6 days straight, I received no over time, my only payment was the children saying thank you at the end of the night. I am not asking for applause myself, nor any recognition but please do not insult my profession by saying I'm in it for the money. I strike because I am worried about the education system as a teacher and a mother. I do not want my children educated in a system where their attainment levels are more important than their names. I do not want them educated in a system where achievement is only recognised if it falls in A-C. I do not want my children educated in a system blocked up by an ageing teacher population forced to work until 68 with no room for new talent and fresh ideas. I do not want my children educated by teachers so consumed by their workload that they have no energy or enthusiasm to do what they're good at; teaching. I do not want this for my children and I do not want it for yours and this is why I strike.

    Report this comment

    Pipps

    Wednesday, March 26, 2014

  • Crazy strike greedy teachers. yes they may have to work what I would regard as normal hours (which they find unnaceptable) but they get 13 weeks leave a year. Yes they may try to resist pension reform but really every other industry has gone there with an aging population what makes them special? Wake up teachers & get in the real world....

    Report this comment

    andy bygrave

    Wednesday, March 26, 2014

  • It's easy to focus on the holidays and short days but let's not forget these teachers are highly qualified and have all gone through years of university and college to get where they are - they do not have short working days and thanks to Mr Gove now have another 4 or 5 hours work after classes finish whilst losing the benefits and perks you all seem to focus on If we let them down just like we did the nurses then Schools will soon will be staffed in the same manner- Would you be happy having children taught by a teacher where English is a second language? If it's such a cushty job why aren't you all teachers?

    Report this comment

    Jonno65

    Wednesday, March 26, 2014

  • Teachers are among the highest paid public servants in the land, get generous holidays and pension arrangements. Despite this children still leave school unable to read write, spell, use grammar, have a work ethic or be fit for further education or the workplace. Strike action is shoddy irresponsible and antisocial

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    Carborundum

    Wednesday, March 26, 2014

  • Well Patrick I think I am well qualified to say what I did having started teaching at 21 and burnt out by 57. So I don;t need you to insuate that I don't understand the pressures. Sure many will ride the storms and get there but I took a reduced pension as I knew pretty much that if I had continued teaching I would not be here to day to claim any pension or even respond to some if the uninformed, generalised tripe being written on here !

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    Responsible parent

    Wednesday, March 26, 2014

  • Thank you for a positive and well thought out comment.

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    Jan Sweet

    Wednesday, March 26, 2014

  • Norfolk John. Larson. I only have one account on here as well, so it is no good saying I have several and like NJ, I am no troll either.

    Report this comment

    "V"

    Wednesday, March 26, 2014

  • How lovely to see such well written, grammatically correct comments from those of you who attended school regularly. Well done to your teachers!

    Report this comment

    They're there

    Wednesday, March 26, 2014

  • I am a teacher and have been for 10 years. I am on strike. Two weeks ago, we put on a production at our school, I worked from 8am until 10.30pm for 6 days straight, I received no over time, my only payment was the children saying thank you at the end of the night. I am not asking for applause myself, nor any recognition but please do not insult my profession by saying I'm in it for the money. I strike because I am worried about the education system as a teacher and a mother. I do not want my children educated in a system where their attainment levels are more important than their names. I do not want them educated in a system where achievement is only recognised if it falls in A-C. I do not want my children educated in a system blocked up by an ageing teacher population forced to work until 68 with no room for new talent and fresh ideas. I do not want my children educated by teachers so consumed by their workload that they have no energy or enthusiasm to do what they're good at; teaching. I do not want this for my children and I do not want it for yours and this is why I strike.

    Report this comment

    Pipps

    Wednesday, March 26, 2014

  • A bit rich coming a few days after parents were fined for taking their kids out of school. Maybe if the parents had said they were doing it because they disagreed with the system and were removing their kids by way of industrial action to force change, they wouldn't be fined. Anyway, teachers go into the job with eyes wide open. I wouldn't do their job, but if they don't like it then find another job. If I don't like my pay and conditions then I either find another role or grin and bare it. It pays the bills!!

    Report this comment

    Andy T

    Wednesday, March 26, 2014

  • Congratulations to the Thomas Clarkson Academy.Wisbech, who have remained open.

    Report this comment

    Robert West

    Wednesday, March 26, 2014

  • Valpy Word, I'd be happy to hear how you'd suggest making an impact. I've tried writing to my MP and Mr Gove, unfortunately both provided fruitless responses. I've signed petitions and encouraged others to do the same - they've so far been ignored. My union has attempted talks with the government but after 3 years we've made limited progress - am I missing something? JEN - perhaps you don't have children in the education system at the moment. If you do, you should be more worried about their experience and the government wants it that you seem to be at the moment. I think I made it clear in my first post - this isn't me whinging about how much I get paid but the effects the current government's changes are having on teachers as individuals and the far reaching consequences they have on the bigger picture. But well done for working weekends - you should have been a teacher.

    Report this comment

    Pipps

    Wednesday, March 26, 2014

  • Whatever the considerations may be I think this strike will achieve nothing positive. I'm not a teacher but I am aware of some of the challenges they face and am bemused by some of the government officers appearing in the media with their latest 'whizzes'! As an aside I believe the least our government could do is appoint officers and spokespersons who at the very least appear to speak common sense. And the same should apply to officers in the private sector where at times appalling leadership and management is evident. On the other hand I note that one commenter herein refers to a 'long stress-free life' - now where is that for any of us who have strived and strive to support ourselves and our families? And then you see parents complaining because they can't 'fly' their families away for holidays in holiday time because it's too expensive (is that because the planes are already full of families flying off on holiday?) - Ah! - more stress and more comments like 'times are tough'. Well - for those of you who only have a few years on the clock I can tell you that times used to be a whole lot tougher when we were all had to walk everywhere and didn't even know about all the 'stuff' people have and do today. But actually we did OK, and actually we quite enjoyed ourselves, and we walked and cycled and read books to our children and made sure they turned up at school already knowing how to behave, well I'm sure a lot still do today. So teachers, I sympathise with you a bit, as I sympathise with the rest of us a bit. I can do this a bit because I'm retired and have a bit of time on my hands: until I retired I was kept busy earning a living and thought that most others were doing the same, although I must admit that as I progressed through my seventy years I met more and more people who were (almost permanently) either 'gutted' (a horrible expression), knackered or stressed-out, or any combination or all of these. And maybe that's what it's all about - perhaps times (and teaching and everything) really are much tougher - or maybe it's the case that 'we' just ain't as tough as we used to be - I just don't know!

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    wallywalnut

    Thursday, March 27, 2014

  • I feel that it is totally unacceptable for schools to be fullypartially closed due to this strike action and affecting childrens education. My daughter is off today because her school Sprowston High is partially closed and her year being judged as one that can suffer. Why do teachers think they are special cases, everybody has suffered over recent years due to the recession affecting pay and pensions and reduction in living standards. But that is the way things are now, and majority of working people have accepted and adapted to the way things are now. Strike action is not going to change anything, teachers are well rewarded for the hours they work

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    norfolko

    Wednesday, March 26, 2014

  • Those who can, do. Those who can't, teach. I would have thought teaching was one of those vocations where the main reward comes with the results.

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    backwoodsman

    Thursday, March 27, 2014

  • Sad that noticing a typo error is your only contribution to the debate Oldperson ;-) and says nothing about my experience of education over the years.To repeat it 3 times for this column is a bit excessive don't you think !! Good luck to all who who seek to improve teachers working conditions. Pleased to see there was a fairly even split in favour of them withdrawing their labour today.

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    Responsible parent

    Wednesday, March 26, 2014

  • I feel that it is totally unacceptable for schools to be fullypartially closed due to this strike action and affecting childrens education. My daughter is off today because her school Sprowston High is partially closed and her year being judged as one that can suffer. Why do teachers think they are special cases, everybody has suffered over recent years due to the recession affecting pay and pensions and reduction in living standards. But that is the way things are now, and majority of working people have accepted and adapted to the way things are now. Strike action is not going to change anything, teachers are well rewarded for the hours they work.

    Report this comment

    norfolko

    Wednesday, March 26, 2014

  • Pipps, ok so you are a teacher. I had to work 10 hr days, 5 days a week, and then another job often Saturdays and Sundays, for months on end to earn less than the average teachers pay. It is about time teachers stopped complaining as with good pay and very generous holidays, I only get 4 weeks each year, many are in a very good job.

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    JEN

    Wednesday, March 26, 2014

  • Well said T&B poor old V has issues and undermines his pig ignorance with his Vacuous, Vile comments...keep em coming V !!!!!

    Report this comment

    Sportswagon

    Wednesday, March 26, 2014

  • The strike caused me significant problems sorting out childcare etc, but I put the blame firmly at Gove's door. His recent announcements about the school day and examination style are ill thought out and don't allow children to be children. I hope that he is listening to the teachers, but sadly I doubt it.

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    Ellie

    Wednesday, March 26, 2014

  • Everyone who is writing here complaining about teachers going on strike have expressed what they believe are legitimate viewpoints. However, anyone who has a child which goes to a state school has made the assumption that other people are happy to contribute to its welfare and education by paying taxes whether they like it or not? There are plenty of childless taxpayers in this country who are forced to pay for the education of other peoples children even though they shouldn't have to. One could argue that people who are happy to send their children to state schools only do so because they can't afford to send them to a private one? Having a child should mean that you can afford to provide for all its needs ,including its education. In this regard teachers employed in state schools are only able to strike because the state sector exists. If they worked for a private school that option wouldn't exist!

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    Bad Form

    Wednesday, March 26, 2014

  • How many moaners are truly worried about their child's education being adversely affected by a teacher strike or is it the inconvenience caused by the withdrawl of the largest state run baby sitting service that allows them to go to work?

    Report this comment

    NigelS

    Wednesday, March 26, 2014

  • PDH, it's no use trying to be the voice of reason on here I'm afraid. The problem with these forums is that any story that is considered 'fair game' and not involving any sort of tragedy, will be challenged. In this case teaching staff are perceived as being a bit whingy, and there are a lot of people who are a lot worse off than them. As soon as comments start you will find opinions from all points of the compass, some constructive, some destructive and some mischievous. It's just the way it is with keyboard warriors of every persuasion. The moderators only get involved in instances of personal abuse, bad language and legal issues etc. If you want reasoned and thoughtful discussion, you won't find it here I'm afraid!

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    backwoodsman

    Friday, March 28, 2014

  • Teaching is a highly stressful job bedevilled by constant government interference,many teachers do not live long after retirement if they get that far because they are completely burnt out! Those who are under the impression that it is a cushy option have never experienced it! My honest advice to anybody considering a career in teaching is to forget it if you want a long reasonably stress free existence!.

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    Harry Rabinowitz

    Thursday, March 27, 2014

  • Can I please make a polite request that those people whom have personal grievances with each other sort out their differences in private and not on a public forum for debate. Also can I make a polite request to the moderator to moderate this thread with more responsibility.

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    PDH

    Thursday, March 27, 2014

  • If they don’t want to teach let them go and get a job in the real world – no more 12 week holiday allowance and no more 6 hour working days. In the meantime, if parents are getting fined £60 if they take their child out of school, fine each striking teacher £60 for every child that they don’t teach today.

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    Norfolk John

    Wednesday, March 26, 2014

  • Patrick, think you missed the lesson on stereotyping...

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    Pipps

    Wednesday, March 26, 2014

  • Why go into a job like teaching and then whine about how terrible it is? Nobody is twisting their arms up their backs to stay. They haven't got enough about them to try anything else, that's the trouble. The majority of teachers don't know what the real world is like, having been to school, uni and straight back to school again.

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    samphirelover

    Wednesday, March 26, 2014

  • Well at least they will be back at work tomorrow - well until 3pm anyway!

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    Norfolk John

    Wednesday, March 26, 2014

  • I can see why V only has one letter as it's clearly all their intelligence can handle, I know what the missing letters are 'ulgar' - but I doubt you'll get that one! The skill of a teacher is to teach not have life skills - Yes an engineering background would help an engineering teacher but a majority of teachers have to follow an ever changing curriculum set out by Mr Gove and his cronies. Their skill is to take this and turn it into interesting, informative and educational lessons something you can't get from working in industry for 10 years.

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    Jonno65

    Wednesday, March 26, 2014

  • That one arrived. How is it that Norfolko and Pipps have 3 times the same comments appearing?

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    Patrick

    Wednesday, March 26, 2014

  • Valpy Word, I'd be happy to hear how you'd suggest making an impact. I've tried writing to my MP and Mr Gove, unfortunately both provided fruitless responses. I've signed petitions and encouraged others to do the same - they've so far been ignored. My union has attempted talks with the government but after 3 years we've made limited progress - am I missing something? JEN - perhaps you don't have children in the education system at the moment. If you do, you should be more worried about their experience and the government wants it that you seem to be at the moment. I think I made it clear in my first post - this isn't me whinging about how much I get paid but the effects the current government's changes are having on teachers as individuals and the far reaching consequences they have on the bigger picture. But well done for working weekends - you should have been a teacher.

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    Pipps

    Wednesday, March 26, 2014

  • my education wasn't entirely wasted. I didn't particularly enjoy English Literature, but I do remember the great words of one of our greatest writers, George Bernard Shaw..... “Those who can, do. Those who can’t, teach"!

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    Norfolk and Good

    Thursday, March 27, 2014

  • Was that the lesson with an ohp or PowerPoint and TutorExpert reading out everything on the screen as if we couldn't read it ourselves? Oh happy, happy BakerInset Days!

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    Patrick

    Wednesday, March 26, 2014

  • Wishing the teachers on strike today every success in defending their pay and working conditions. Its so sad to see comments against the strike along the lines of "I work harder than teachers", "I work longer hours than teachers","I get paid less than teachers," and so on. What's that all about? Are people taking part in some kind of race to the bottom? We know there are many people today with poor pay and work conditions, and I'm sure that if they voted via their union to take action to improve their conditions, those striking teachers would agree with them 100%.

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    angela

    Wednesday, March 26, 2014

  • I wonder what the striking teachers would have to say if they turned up for treatment at their local hospital to find that the nurses and Doctors were on strike? I don't suppose they would be impressed and I am similarly unimpressed at their actions today. Thank goodness I no longer have school age children.

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    caroline jacobs

    Wednesday, March 26, 2014

  • In this day and age strikes should be a thing of the past, they don't achieve much they just cause inconvenience for all concerned . The teachers are educated themselves to good standards the government is like an unruly child in school , you have to sit round a table and discuss the problem. No matter how long it takes.not walking the streets with banners I don't think this is a good reflection on your teaching standards.yes we live in a democratic country and you are free to march with banners high , but please teachers themselves can achieve more with help from there own pupils And parents by petitioning and writing to there own local minister of parliament ,and the government ,don't always be ruled by unions you have a stronger voice.i wish the teachers all best and hope they can help achieve a better standard for themselves and education for our children,one other things I think this government need to rethink teachers working until there 68 years of age,I myself being 60 years old and my 2year old grandaughter wears me out so a classroom full doesn't bear thinking about,I also have to work until 66years old being a seaman for 44years how I will cope with getting thrown about the North Sea for another 6years who knows but does this government care , not at all they are just happy to take there gold plated pensions .

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    mariner

    Thursday, March 27, 2014

  • I am a teacher and have been for 10 years. I am on strike. Two weeks ago, we put on a production at our school, I worked from 8am until 10.30pm for 6 days straight, I received no over time, my only payment was the children saying thank you at the end of the night. I am not asking for applause myself, nor any recognition but please do not insult my profession by saying I'm in it for the money. I strike because I am worried about the education system as a teacher and a mother. I do not want my children educated in a system where their attainment levels are more important than their names. I do not want them educated in a system where achievement is only recognised if it falls in A-C. I do not want my children educated in a system blocked up by an ageing teacher population forced to work until 68 with no room for new talent and fresh ideas. I do not want my children educated by teachers so consumed by their workload that they have no energy or enthusiasm to do what they're good at; teaching. I do not want this for my children and I do not want it for yours and this is why I strike.

    Report this comment

    Pipps

    Wednesday, March 26, 2014

  • @Pipps - I can understand why you're upset at the thought of having to work until you're 68, but Hello, welcome to the real world, this is the same for all of us! New Liebour started raising the retirement age, then it was increased further by the CONservatives aided and abetted by the LibDims. Why should you expect to retire early just because you're a teacher? There's plenty of far more demanding professions having to plod on until they're 68!

    Report this comment

    Norfolk and Good

    Wednesday, March 26, 2014

  • Looks like the local 'Con club' bar flies have been learning how to use the internet today...

    Report this comment

    Andrew Shields

    Wednesday, March 26, 2014

  • Pipps, I can appreciate the conundrum you face, I really can and the frustration you feel at not being listened to resonates with me too. You've clearly looked into numerous avenues and haven't taken the decision to strike lightly. However, while it might raise public awareness of the problems you cite, I'm afraid that rather than raise additional support for your standpoint, for many the reasons for your strike will be overlooked because of the inconvenience it has caused them. Add to that people's obvious frustrations with policies such as the holiday fines and reason get's lost in the ether.

    Report this comment

    Valpy Word

    Wednesday, March 26, 2014

  • To Stephen strange. I quite clearly said the majority of teachers ..... I wasn't assuming they all go straight into teaching.

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    samphirelover

    Wednesday, March 26, 2014

  • What closed shop "V" in teaching ? Please get the facts right. Keep taking the tablets! Norfuk John..what do you call the "real world" ? I dealt with teachers, pupils, parents, social workers, local businesses and industrialists..was that not the real world ? Too many people on here making ludicrous comments without knowing the facts

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    Responsible parent

    Wednesday, March 26, 2014

  • The fact is it is only Michael Gove and his government who have the power to resolve this series of teacher trade disputes,the latest one being a bonus payment system which undermines any national framework around the rate for the job.Senior civil servants are keen to promote such a scheme as they do very nicely from a system that rewards failure,just as we see daily in the banking industry.Teachers are right to reject this.Gove needs to do some listening for a change.

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    Peter Watson

    Wednesday, March 26, 2014

  • Start sacking a few of them, they keep harping on about parents taking kids out of school for holidays when some parents work shifts with allocated holidays. Now they decided to strike for the day, perhaps they should be fined for letting the kids and the parents down, as already mentioed if they dont like it go and get another job.

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    Sweet cheeks

    Wednesday, March 26, 2014

  • I have total respect for most teachers. I myself was a parent helper one day a week whilst my children were at primary school and came out of 'helping' feeling like I had been run over by a steam engine. It is the headteacher, not teachers who authoriseunauthorise absence as a directive from government. That all said I hope my 15 year old who is shopping with her friends today does not get picked up by a truant officer, that would look good on her 100% attendance log!

    Report this comment

    cat

    Wednesday, March 26, 2014

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