Pupils from All Saints Primary School in Winfarthing thank passing motorists for not speeding with the help of a speed gun and Pc James Stables.

Norfolk schoolchildren hit streets to stop drivers speeding

Friday, November 16, 2012
7.22 PM

Speeding drivers received an education about the dangers associated with their behaviour from schoolchildren participating in a speedwatch scheme.

The 45 youngsters from All Saints Primary School in Winfarthing took to Mill Road outside their school on Friday to help Diss PC James Stables and PCSO Aslaug Foreman deal with speeding drivers.

The initiative was started after some of the children raised concerns about speeding cars outside the school so the two police officers attended with a speed gun to enforce the 30mph speed limit.

Drivers caught speeding were pulled over and given the option of a £60 fixed penalty fine or the chance to have a chat with some of the assembled children about their behaviour.

If the motorist chose the latter option the children would then approach the car to speak from a prepared statement, which read: “Please do not speed in Winfarthing. Did you know injuries from an accident involving a car going at 30mph are less serious.”

PCSO Foreman said a couple of drivers had been pulled over after being clocked doing 38 and 39mph and chose the child speech option.

She said after speaking to the children they generally changed their behaviour and warned other drivers to be careful when driving in that area.

The children, aged between nine and 11 in years 3-6, have also created signs placed by the roadside approaching the village asking motorists to slow down and held up a placard reading “Thank You” for motorists who had adhered to the 30mph limit.

John Moule, the school’s deputy headteacher, said: “It is part of safety awareness for the children. It is really the children forcing the message home and we are trying to do it in the most positive way we can.”

Pupil Elliot Spencer, 11, from Winfarthing was one of the children taking part in the safety awareness scheme. He said: “Some people drive too fast and put other people in danger and they could kill people. By doing this, we hope they will read the message and hopefully take more notice because we are little children.”

Joshua Smith, 10, from Shelfanger, said: “It is very important for the community to do this because we don’t want anyone being put in danger like mums walking with children and it is very important to keep your speed down.

“If it is children delivering the message then I think drivers will take more notice and hopefully keep their speed down in future.”