Great Yarmouth school told it requires improvement in latest Ofsted report

Case study: Headteacher of Edward Worlledge middle school, Dawn Kightley with some of the pupils.; Photo: Nick Butcher; Copy: Tony Carroll; For:  EDP; Archant © 2009; (01603) 772434 Case study: Headteacher of Edward Worlledge middle school, Dawn Kightley with some of the pupils.; Photo: Nick Butcher; Copy: Tony Carroll; For: EDP; Archant © 2009; (01603) 772434

Saturday, March 15, 2014
8:34 AM

A Great Yarmouth junior school has seen a slip in its Ofsted grade after being told it requires improvement.

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Inspectors said Edward Worlledge Junior School needed improvement in its leadership and management, pupil achievement and quality of teaching.

The school was previously listed as ‘good’ but head teacher Dawn Kightley said “key changes” had already been made since the inspection.

In their report inspectors said standards achieved in Year 6 were “well below” the national average in English and maths, and the work teachers set in lessons was often too hard or too easy.

They also said some marking did not show pupils how to improve their work and governors did not hold school leaders to account “rigorously enough” for standards and progress within the school.

The report added: “Leaders have not taken sufficient action quickly enough to improve the quality of teaching over time and raise standards so that more pupils make the good progress of which they are capable.”

But inspectors said “recent actions” were having a positive impact, and they also praised pupil behaviour and the “strong, supportive” staff team at the school.

Other strengths they noted included; attendance being above average, good opportunities for pupils to take part in a variety of sports, musical activities and visits and opportunities for parents to learn about the school’s teaching methods, in order to support their children at home.

Mrs Kightley said everyone at the school was committed to “improving and raising standards” for the benefit of students, and she was confident changes made since the inspection would address the areas of weakness identified in the report.

She said: “These changes include improving the way we mark pupils’ work so we show pupils what they need to do to get better, as well as making sure our children have more opportunities to use the skills they have learned in English and maths in other subjects.

“In addition, staff and governors are taking a much more proactive approach to analysing our in-house data, which will help us to identify where we need to target our resources and support to improve standards and attainment.”

Mrs Kightley was particularly pleased with inspectors’ comments about the school’s “happy and welcoming community” and said staff believed firmly in the benefits of extra curricular activities offered - a factor also highlighted in the report. Children were well-behaved and polite.

6 comments

  • No.......what Requires Improvement, or better still abolition, is Ofsted which is a discredited, useless political tool of Government.

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    Sportswagon

    Sunday, March 16, 2014

  • "Boards of governors are outdated and largely unaccountable and would be better replaced by a return to local education offices and officers to oversee schools and local parent schools liaison and complaints adjudication officers. " Daisy. Do you mean people like Castle ?. If so, please don't make me laugh

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    "V"

    Sunday, March 16, 2014

  • Is it her off Corrie? The one who works in the Taxi office.

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    Cuthbert J. Twillie

    Saturday, March 15, 2014

  • Governors meetings should be open to the public, just like council meetings, unless the issue is particularly sensitive. I know the minutes are published, but they are normally very condensed, and rarely accurate.

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    Rhombus

    Saturday, March 15, 2014

  • Ofsted reports can be viewed on line and at the very least they allow parents who had their eyes open at the last parents evening to see how wrong ( or right) Ofsted inspectors are. Of course little that Gove and his predecessors have done has been any good-I thought that was a given. Especially since they all started from a point where they assumed standards had fallen since some mythical point in the past and then proceeded to deconstruct what we had. The comment about the governors makes me laugh ( if it wasnt so worrying) Why should a group of people with no teaching qualification, with no minimum academic qualification for appointment, with ulterior political motives or personal or religious axes to grind-wide boys, old party stalwarts, local worthies and parents who think what is best for their kid is best for all children necessarily be fit people to tell head teachers what to do and over see your child's education? Boards of governors are outdated and largely unaccountable and would be better replaced by a return to local education offices and officers to oversee schools and local parent schools liaison and complaints adjudication officers.

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    Daisy Roots

    Saturday, March 15, 2014

  • I do wonder sometimes why this imformation is made public, and why the data from the sats is given to the politicians as they only undermine offstead whilst using the data to beat each other up with. I don't see how it helps.

    Report this comment

    parkeg1

    Saturday, March 15, 2014

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