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Gorleston pupil placed in seclusion for wearing the ‘wrong’ shoes

PUBLISHED: 12:39 11 September 2015 | UPDATED: 13:05 11 September 2015

Shakira Silom who was put into seclusion at Ormiston Venture academy in Gorleston after being told that her new black school shoes which have brown/black under soles were not suitable shoes unless she painted the under soles.

Picture: James Bass

Shakira Silom who was put into seclusion at Ormiston Venture academy in Gorleston after being told that her new black school shoes which have brown/black under soles were not suitable shoes unless she painted the under soles. Picture: James Bass

(C) Archant Norfolk 2015

A 12-year-old schoolgirl has been told she cannot join classmates in lessons until she paints the soles of her shoes black.

Shakira Silom has been placed in seclusion over the “banned” brown soles while her parents pledge to stand firm over the “ridiculous” rule.

Parents Jason and Gillian Silom say the colour of the undersoles does not affect her learning and that separating her from her friends is making matters worse.

But Simon Gilbert-Barnham, principal at Ormiston Venture Academy, said upholding an unrelenting focus on standards helped students to achieve and realise their full potential.

Shakira, of Horsley Drive, Gorleston, returned to school after the summer holidays on Thursday last week in her new pair of shoes and was pulled to one side when staff checked uniforms.

Year eight pupil Shakira said she was asked to paint the brown undersole of her shoes black so they met the school dress code. On Monday, when she returned to classes wearing the same shoes, she was placed into seclusion.

Mr Silom said: “Shakira sent me a text on Monday morning telling me the school had put her into seclusion and the school have since told us she will remain in there until her shoes are changed.

“I have to say I think this is a joke. Surely there are more important 
things for the school to worry about than the colour of the shoes pupils wear?”

The New Look shoes, which cost £25, are black on top but the undersoles are finished in a light-brown shade and the situation has angered Mrs Silom who said she had made sure before buying them that they would be suitable.

She said: “I think it is ridiculous.

“We made sure we followed the school’s uniform guidelines, which mentioned nothing about the colour of the undersoles. At the end of the day how does the colour of your shoes affect how you learn in school?”

In a statement, Mr Gilbert-Barnham, said: “At Venture, I unapologetically maintain the highest of standards for our students. A small number of students who returned with the incorrect uniform were given two days to resolve the situation and have been offered appropriate footwear in the interim from the academy to enable them to access their learning.

“We have maintained these high standards since we opened in 2010 and it was highlighted in our ‘Outstanding’ Ofsted report that ‘students wear their uniforms with pride’.

“We ensure the highest of standards to enable us to focus on the conversation of learning and the students education. It is this unrelenting focus that enables our students to achieve so highly and realise their full potential.”
However Shakira’s parents are concerned about the affect seclusion is having on their daughter.

Mrs Silom said: “Shakira is frustrated and upset about the whole situation. Being in seclusion is also having an affect on her education as the school are not giving her work to do whilst she is in there.”

Mr Gilbert-Barnham’s statement said work was given out to those in seclusion.
“We work hard to ensure the daily learning of all students in the classroom is engaging and exciting. It is unfortunate that in this instance the refusal to work together and accept the offered interim solution has led to the student being set the work away from the classroom.”

66 comments

  • Benboben

    Monday, September 14, 2015

  • There is no legislation in place that deals specifically with school uniform or other aspects of appearance therefore no law has been broken by the parents or pupil concerned,conformity or policy is not law,the school has a duty in law to educate your child.failing to teach your child in a secure unbiased environment is unlawful,punishing a child for reasons beyond their control is against the law. teaching staff must lead by example.there is no proof or data to suggest uniform in schools lead to better behaviour or better grades.parents may also want to enquire about cctv with audio active recording in toilet blocks and changing rooms etc.check your school now.dont bother to troll i know the law backwards.

    Report this comment

    Benboben

    Monday, September 14, 2015

  • 'self suffient' - 'mught' - 'school were' - 'cleally' -- are these examples of poor teaching, poor learning, disobeying rules, being distracted by brown shoes in a 'black shoe' school .. or some other reason for ailing English skills? Rules are rules, disobeying gives a non-story a certain viability, don't you think? Or is there simply nothing of any more importance?

    Report this comment

    Patrick

    Sunday, September 13, 2015

  • Gone away- Still hiding behind your laptop , what a muppet!

    Report this comment

    dave123

    Sunday, September 13, 2015

  • Nowhere did I state that an office dress code stipulated the colour of soles of shoes. What I said was quite clear "Many offices have a strict dress code". Whatever that code states is expected to be adhered to. The school this young lady appears to have a particularly detailed dress code, as long it is clear and not ambiguous it should be followed.

    Report this comment

    Realistic Rob

    Sunday, September 13, 2015

  • As if we need any more confirmation that Academies are not about nurturing children to be self suffient strong willed young people but to just whip them over the GCSE statistics finishing line. 'Many offices have strict dress code' would you like to name those that dictate the colour of the soles of your shoes?

    Report this comment

    Jonno65

    Sunday, September 13, 2015

  • When this young lady applies for her first job, and the potential employer does a quick google search and checks out her Facebook page (should she have one) and sees all the results about her and the shoes, do you think she will get invited for an interview? Probably not, they would see, rebel or troublemaker. The belief that there is no such thing as bad publicity is false.

    Report this comment

    Realistic Rob

    Sunday, September 13, 2015

  • DEE: Assuming that you're an adult, it's no wonder that the Shakira's of this world have such positive role models to follow.

    Report this comment

    One Horse Town

    Sunday, September 13, 2015

  • @ Linda Sinclair. If you read my post properly you mught have seen it was quite impartial and suggested there were faults on both sides. There are companies who have a strict dress code because it people you may be surprised to here try to impose there own often sloppy standards.

    Report this comment

    Realistic Rob

    Sunday, September 13, 2015

  • She could do that Dee, or she could wear the right shoes, get on with her education, make something of her life and end up changing the system by working in education or government.

    Report this comment

    TheTruth

    Sunday, September 13, 2015

  • I really hope Shakira paints the soles of her shoes black as the school suggests, perhaps just before she enters the school on monday morning, then tread the black paint foot prints all round the school floors just to prove a point. If not, perhaps the shoes could be painted in an art lesson?

    Report this comment

    Dee

    Saturday, September 12, 2015

  • Actually 'I am mostly wrong??', it says the girls sent a text home to the parents whilst in seclusion. That'll be another rule the girl has has broken; see a pattern emerging?

    Report this comment

    They're there

    Saturday, September 12, 2015

  • Realistic Bob "Many offices now have a strict dress code, " Really .....? that strict...? can't say I know of any! Either way, the school were totally out of order and over the top. A simple letter requesting shoes that comply would have been quite sufficient, to put the child in seclusion, to ridicule and embarrass her in front of her peers at a new school is disgusting,it's cruel and outright bullying.

    Report this comment

    Linda Sinclair

    Saturday, September 12, 2015

  • The school is not complaining about the soles - that's just commentsrs trying to make out the school is unreasonable. However, the rules clearly state "black... they may not have any embellishments... or any other colour on them." The photograph cleally shows light brown visible in a significant way from the side. Therefore they break the rules.

    Report this comment

    So_Many_Haters!

    Saturday, September 12, 2015

  • They are essentially black so what's the big deal. Does it affect her school work having brown soles.............NO thought not.

    Report this comment

    Maggot

    Saturday, September 12, 2015

  • This is unfortunate and may be a genuine mistake, but, it is a lesson in life. Many offices now have a strict dress code, so it is a chance to learn. There is little point having a dress code if it is not followed, but a little understanding and tolerance from both head teacher and parents would not go amiss.

    Report this comment

    Realistic Rob

    Saturday, September 12, 2015

  • @dave123 - know the family well, do you, to make such comments? Troll.

    Report this comment

    GoneAway

    Saturday, September 12, 2015

  • surprised she hasn't played the bullying card yet,yet another little madam with Bossy parents who think there above the rules.Try another school

    Report this comment

    dave123

    Saturday, September 12, 2015

  • So, when is a black shoe not a black shoe? The majority of the visible part of the shoe - the uppers - is black. And I think that nearly everyone would say "they are black shoes" There needs to be clarity on the rules - either "black including the bits you can see" or "black including EVERY PART even if you can't see it". Maybe that would include the writing inside? Black writing on black leater. Like the Hitch Hikers Guide to the Galaxy, I recall! As has bees posted, a fair compromise would be to use a black marker on the brown stiching and the material around the side, so from above, all the shoe looked black. IF the school insisted on the underside of the sole being black, they they would indeed be ridiculed for being petty minded and foolish. However I DO agree that high standards and expectations should be maintained. That includes the dress of all the school staff. And sometimes I am horrified by the slob-like appearance of some teachers. Not a good example in those cases.

    Report this comment

    East Anglian Man

    Saturday, September 12, 2015

  • @PaulWho - Freakonomics? Semi-comedic pretend sociology. Not sneering at Shakira's parents' 'culture', by any chance, are you? Thought so.

    Report this comment

    GoneAway

    Saturday, September 12, 2015

  • Paulwho, whatever is wrong with the girl's name? It's not a run of the mill British name but so what? And just because somebody puts their own opinions into print doesn't mean you have to believe them. Not all of us are sheep. I think Shakira is lovely name.

    Report this comment

    Green Ink from Tunbridge Wells

    Saturday, September 12, 2015

  • I AM MOSTLY WRONG: Interesting user name. Don't be so hard on yourself. For example, your use of punctuation is breathtaking.

    Report this comment

    One Horse Town

    Saturday, September 12, 2015

  • My guess is that dear little Shakira was already a paid up member of the 'seclusion' club, and the shoes are a bit of a red herring.

    Report this comment

    Rhombus

    Saturday, September 12, 2015

  • the school text the parent to tell them the child was in seclusion where has the phone call gone or were they afraid of confrontation even a call to the mobile number supplied would have been more polite also if you are looking down onto shoes you would see black if you were looking all round then you would see the sides I wonder if this Ofsted wear suitable clothing when inspecting schools come to think of it fifty odd years ago when I was at school the teachers used to dress like hippies has that changed I wonder kettle black comes to mind

    Report this comment

    i am mostly wrong??

    Saturday, September 12, 2015

  • I see the parents have gone for a traditional name. Anyone read "Freakonomics"?

    Report this comment

    PaulWho

    Saturday, September 12, 2015

  • all the parents need is an indelible ink pen to colour the sides of the soles

    Report this comment

    mickthedig

    Saturday, September 12, 2015

  • Ah Daisy!, the days of the "Greenflies". I also went through that wonderful school although not taking full advantage of the education that was on offer. Yes, very strict dress rules. No drain-pipes, winkle pickers or socks other than grey. Skirts a regulation length in your case. But... we all knew the rules and even failure to wear your hat whilst representing the school at sport on the weekend would result in detention. Many of us ran the risk but we knew that there would be consequences if caught. And heaven forbid, if our parents became aware (lets say responsible parents who had respect for the rules), there would be further punishment at home too. I too feel sorry for the young girl,having been isolated but lets not make a huge deal of it. Parents get her some shoes that comply and be done with it.

    Report this comment

    rament

    Saturday, September 12, 2015

  • Well, I think the rules seem rather over the top and that the shoes look perfectly fine for school. But the sides and top of the soles are visible and they are clearly not black. If the rules say shoes must be all black then they must be all black - including the soles. The family should just colour them - it would take seconds and cost next to nothing. If they are going to bring the girl up to rebel at every petty rule in life then she's going to have a very bumpy ride of it. Best to comply with the silly little things and aim your anger at the really big injustices of the world.

    Report this comment

    Cyril the Canary

    Friday, September 11, 2015

  • Those are soles!

    Report this comment

    Madein Holt

    Friday, September 11, 2015

  • @ted: you may be right, a bit unfair on quite a lot of teachers, perhaps. As skoalbandit says 'a pointless story' or a non-story, but allows readers to say that rules are best reserved for other people and other people's children.

    Report this comment

    Patrick

    Friday, September 11, 2015

  • So they got 'outstanding' for school uniforms and shiny shoes? Surely not?

    Report this comment

    Imperial Echoes

    Friday, September 11, 2015

  • In Australia they can have coloured soles on their shoes, it seems like the loony brigade has struck again and we cant have anything but black on our soles in Britain.

    Report this comment

    dr.zack

    Friday, September 11, 2015

  • Typical of the mindless, petty rules we are burdened with in this once great country of ours. Little wonder everything has gone to pot. Everyone is being overwhelmed with such ---- , and the really important issues get overlooked. Common sense seems to have been overshadowed by nonsense.

    Report this comment

    Grey Fox

    Friday, September 11, 2015

  • I'm not a member of the Daily Mail "rules are rules" brigade, and as such I get sick of seeing these articles. Skirt an inch too short? Trousers deemed too tight? Tie slightly the wrong colour? You must be punished! Never mind education.

    Report this comment

    Throatwobbler Mangrove

    Friday, September 11, 2015

  • This is gob smacking. School uniforms are all about making sure the child enters school for education in sensible clothing - as some parents will dress them in any old cheap rubbish; and spend the child benefit on booze. This child's shoes look sensible and sober, so what's the problem - other than the academy going on a power trip?

    Report this comment

    Imperial Echoes

    Friday, September 11, 2015

  • LOL was a teacher in Norfolk for many years and remember many "run ins" over school uniform etc. I can not remember one about the colour of the soles of a shoe, or even the sides of he soles. Ah well each to their spotlight of fame. I'm glad that the so called head of an "Academy" is so proud that black soles are leading the charge to excellence. There is a considerable difference between pride in appearance and blindly following rules - certainly from the way the rules are written it doesn't describe soles . . . I just wish I had the money to pay for a legal challenge.

    Report this comment

    manbythesea

    Friday, September 11, 2015

  • It's good to see teachers concentrating on what's important and not getting themselves involved with trivial nonsense.

    Report this comment

    PaulWho

    Friday, September 11, 2015

  • Get some marker pen around the bottoms and get on with it, you didn't read the policy and you ignored warning after it was pointed out. Pointless story that's not going to end in your favour.

    Report this comment

    Skoalbandit

    Friday, September 11, 2015

  • patrick i suspect the average parent would be very capable of educating their own child, after all they would be hard pressed to make a worse job than the schools are making!

    Report this comment

    ted

    Friday, September 11, 2015

  • I suspect some people making comments here do not have any experience of Ormiston Venture academy or the staff so cannot make an informed comment in my opinion. The school has a very clear uniform policy for anyone to read, it clearly states that shoes should be black without any other colouring. Of course a childs learning isnt based on what shoes they are wearing but this is about discipline and learning skills for later life e.g. Workplace policies regarding uniforms and presenting a smart image. Most schools in UK have a uniform, if this is something that a parent disagrees with then dont chose a school that has one!

    Report this comment

    Deborah Needham

    Friday, September 11, 2015

  • My post should have read 'Principals' not principles - doh!

    Report this comment

    Deborah Needham

    Friday, September 11, 2015

  • @ DR: if education is a right, then with it must come responsibilities. Like Rules. " ... all the rules suit you all through your life ... etc" - silly - you can't keep all the people happy all the time, so we cannot realistically write different rules for each and every pupil, they are no longer Rules, are they? If any parents disagree with the Rules (followed by the majority) I think that they can apply to educate their child at home.

    Report this comment

    Patrick

    Friday, September 11, 2015

  • parents......oops

    Report this comment

    Rhombus

    Friday, September 11, 2015

  • Why doesn't the school simply fine the parents at £5 for each day the wrong shoes are worn...this way the student still gets an uninterrupted education, and the parent's pay for their mischief.

    Report this comment

    Rhombus

    Friday, September 11, 2015

  • Bumble: an ex school governor? How does that qualify you to pass judgement on a headteacher that is running a successful school. In 'my' experience 'some' school governors can be an absolute blight on the progress of a school which one story, currently currently covered by the EDP concerning a school in Yarmouth, demonstrates. Incidentally, Daisy, remember that I said it's not actually about the 'shoes'......or in your case the knickers.

    Report this comment

    One Horse Town

    Friday, September 11, 2015

  • Given the abysmal education system in Norfolk with schools frequently falling foul of OFSTED examination it is appalling that pupils should be punished for the colour of the soles of their shoes. Few schools on the continent demand school regulation clothing. They just concentrate on teaching the pupils. The head teacher should be disciplined by the School Governors for this high handed approach. I speak as an ex-school governor.

    Report this comment

    bumble7

    Friday, September 11, 2015

  • If you read again Daisy you will see I was referring to the principal of the school, as in the head teacher.

    Report this comment

    They're there

    Friday, September 11, 2015

  • Although my school did insist on green gym knickers. Perhaps that is why I flunked physics in III form if OHT is to be believed. I really pity kids today, all Gradgrinds and those who think a book is made by its cover.

    Report this comment

    Daisy Roots

    Friday, September 11, 2015

  • Hmm Well at least I know when to use effect or affect and principal or principle... When low waged parents of my fellow pupils found the money for the expensive uniform which could be obtained only from one outlet, they were glad to do so because their children had gained a scholarship to a decent school. Today's parents are finding money for over- restrictive uniforms demanded by management teams whose minds could be said to be concentrated on their careers and salaries rather than pupil welfare. For children to receive an education which should be their right. Last time I looked at Clarks shoes, a pair for a toddler cost over £30 so I expect it might be fair to say New Look provided a more economical alternative. Uniforms were adopted by the first public schools because their pupils were boarders and because there were often military connections. Fee paying day schools copied their " betters" and so did state grammar schools. Until the 50s uniform was not always demanded of those who did not attend grammar school-this did not make them rampaging thugs. When I was at primary school we did not wear uniform. I suspect those putting the case for uniforms may be too young to know they really do not make a difference to how children behave or learn. Or too brainwashed by events in the last few years to question the motives of academies. And no One Horse Town, I did not object to wearing uniform-but then it was not some ill fitting tacky polyester thing defined down to the last detail.

    Report this comment

    Daisy Roots

    Friday, September 11, 2015

  • Agree with you TT but it's not New Look's fault. They're just a retailer that's in business (a novelty for Yarmouth). It's the misguided individuals, in this case parents, that choose it ignore or not read clear guidance from the school.

    Report this comment

    One Horse Town

    Friday, September 11, 2015

  • Well done the school and well done for sticking to your guns principal! The blame should lie with New Look and their clear inability to recognise the guidelines 'school wear' needs to follow; not skinny and tight trousers with stupid zips and buttons, not plain black shoes which are not made from canvas and not ridiculously short and tight skirts. Virtually all jobs have uniform policies which need to be adhered to, time to learn how to follow rules young lady and for the parents to support the school!

    Report this comment

    They're there

    Friday, September 11, 2015

  • Samantha: and you are precisely what I've just talked about in my previous comment. As for St Nicholas, it does very well for youngsters and is recognised for it by Ofsted. Your short sighted comment about affecting children's ability to 'read, write and think' is misplaced. What 'does' effect it however, is wasted time in seclusion because 'chip on the shoulder' parents and carers 'want to make a point' and therefore use their child as a way of doing so.

    Report this comment

    One Horse Town

    Friday, September 11, 2015

  • Check great yarmouth primary academy's attendance in January 2015 half the school were sent home for this nonsense! Its a shame for the children! Didn't know it would affect their ability to read write and think!!

    Report this comment

    Samantha Weaver

    Friday, September 11, 2015

  • .........and now a comment from our resident psychologist. "Yeeeees, you see the people objecting to the school's action are more than likely to have had negative experiences themselves at school when young. This leads to a very complex condition manifesting itself as ' chipontheshoulderosis.' The only treatment is for them to come to terms with the fact that schools have rules and that if parents don't agree with them then they have the right to go elsewhere. These people are also normally short sighted as they don't realise that in fact it's GOT NOTHING TO DO WITH THE SHOES. It is 'all' about sending the message to youngsters that they have to have self discipline throughout their studies (and lives) which ultimately helps them to study and succeed. I suggest people like Daisy Roots approach the police and complain that they can't use their mobile phones whilst driving. But of course schools are a softer target and 'everyone's' an expert because they've been to one.

    Report this comment

    One Horse Town

    Friday, September 11, 2015

  • From the Ormiston Victory website: Shoes: No trainers may be worn at any time (excluding PE) at the Academy. Only proper, all black school shoes may be worn, with no visible branding of any kind. Girls may wear black ‘dolly’ shoes, but they may not have any embellishments (glitter, gems, etc.) or any other colour on them. No exceptions will be made to this rule without a doctor’s certificate. Notes from parentscarers will not be accepted. So, the parents say they consulted the uniform code before buying them. Maybe they need to be sent back to school to learn to read. It clearly says that no colours other than black would be accepted, and the photo clearly shows the shoes are NOT all black. Everyone else at the school managed to get shoes that fit the uniform code, so they can't be that hard to find.

    Report this comment

    So_Many_Haters!

    Friday, September 11, 2015

  • Well done to the school! Uniform rules are there to be listened to. My son attends St Nicholas Priory Primary School and they are also strict on uniform policy. Some parents may not listen, which make those of us who do follow the rules look bad, and I got fed up last term seeing kids wearing neon trainers day in and day out, yet when my son wore his BLACK trainers with a tiny blue stripe just once whilst I went to buy his school shoes that split on the sole, he got put in isolation. All parents are informed of the uniform requirements each new school year, so no excuses.

    Report this comment

    Kat Perkins

    Friday, September 11, 2015

  • I agree with the Principles decision, the shoes are half brown. The rules are the rules and are there to be adhered to. The school is well managed and the children are getting a good education and excellent support on a day to day basis. Running to the newspapers is not helping the situation, the other young girl elsewhere in the country with the shaved hair needs to respect the school dress code and this applies to her parents too. As a health care professional i have to adhere to a dress code, if you have been informed of the rules then you need to stick to them, no half measures or your version of the rules!!

    Report this comment

    Deborah Needham

    Friday, September 11, 2015

  • ooh too many comments questioning the fitness of academies for the mods to stomach???

    Report this comment

    Daisy Roots

    Friday, September 11, 2015

  • Just as well the rules dont still include prefects flogging first formers isnt it The Truth. Or would you find following any rule no matter how silly or bad acceptable? Schools should put children first and if the staff and governors cannot familiarise themselves with the realities of finding and paying for items of school wear they should not make strict rules. I wonder if every child at this school has a peg to hang a wet coat upon , or a free locker in which they can keep their books safely , or gets to eat their midday meal with their friends or is allowed to use the toilet when they need to do so. Small things which a caring parent or teacher would take for granted but which some schools-academies in the region think not necessary.

    Report this comment

    Daisy Roots

    Friday, September 11, 2015

  • Oh The Truth-let us hope all the rules suit you all through your life and you don't find yourself following the rules of a totalitarian state. I suspect if we all really believed the" relentless focus on education in these academies " was for the benefit of the children I suspect we would be more tolerant . If we thought that they were delivering a happy enriched education in a comfortable and safe environment we might be happy. But since research shows many children are unhappy and stressed by their school experience and many schools and academies seem to have their eye on the results rather than the child and whether it has actually learned something of value excuse us for being cynical about this strict uniform code.

    Report this comment

    Daisy Roots

    Friday, September 11, 2015

  • Well done the school. Sometimes life has rules which you may not like but still have to follow. That's how society work. If you don't like it then join the school council and get it changed. Massive non-story.

    Report this comment

    TheTruth

    Friday, September 11, 2015

  • Fifty years ago I was a pupil at a school with a bottle green uniform. The school had a strict uniform code and at the start of term had uniform inspections and conduct marks for non compliance. But even back then it seems to have shown more flexibility and commonsense where uniform was concerned than some of these academies .The major difference being it was quite a well respected school . I look now at these tin pot academies copying some superficial aspects of the old grammar schools and am sure that they have their priorities all wrong. This child's parents like many others may have relied on Yarmouth for the purchase of the shoes and if so there will have been a very limited range of sensible shoes and quite possibly none in all black in her size . Strangely not all shoe manufacturers consult school uniform lists before designing shoes. They could have gone to the extra expense of shopping in Norwich, as I found myself forced to do twenty years ago to find decent Clarks or Start Rite shoes for my children. But the headteacher in setting his uniform policy has displayed ignorance and petty fogging daftness and a lack of concern for the practicalities facing parents. The parents have obviously tried, the shoes are relatively sensible-what about his pupils whose parents are on benefits? What is more important, nit picking about a few bits of uniform as a pathetic attempt at discipline or treating the children as individuals and concentrating on their education? We all know the advantages of a basic uniform but the sensible probably know that these academies adopt it for PR reasons and little more. Schools in the USA manage without uniform and if kids have all the appropriate body parts ( and dont get me started on forcing girls into trousers so boys are not " disturbed" ) covered up then little else matters. Uniforms confer anonymity-not desirable in a school. And all the mumsnet -Daily Mail supporters of these schools should think about the worst offences against mankind committed against those made anonymous by uniform.

    Report this comment

    Daisy Roots

    Friday, September 11, 2015

  • Mr Barnham-Gilbert's "unrelenting focus" on learning and results means he cannot see the effect of isolating a twelve year old girl from her friends will have.

    Report this comment

    arfur

    Friday, September 11, 2015

  • Obviously Simon Gilbert-Barnham doesn't realise that even if the bottoms of the shoes were painted black, the paint will wear off. What if these had been shoes specially made for a child, would he behave the same, It's the education of the child not what it wears that's important.

    Report this comment

    Spooky

    Friday, September 11, 2015

  • What an excellent and effortless way of making a young child despise authority! Congratulations, Oberleutnant Gilbert-Barnham; your work with this little one is done.

    Report this comment

    GoneAway

    Friday, September 11, 2015

  • Oh I see. I'm so sorry, I thought you meant Gorleston North Korea, or the Democratic People's Republic of North Korea as we like to call it. I didn't realise you meant Gorleston Norfolk,. Over here, we take democracy very seriously and do not wish to be associated with military dictatorship in anyway whatsoever. We leave that to the United Kingdom's Principal Elite and their steadfast resolve to implement the policies of the Emperor's new clothes

    Report this comment

    Bill Punton's bald patch

    Friday, September 11, 2015

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