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Aylsham pianist is named 2015’s Norfolk Young Musician

20:21 11 January 2015

Norfolk Young Musician of the Year winner Alexander Little, left with second place Megan Storerand third place Murray Chapman at the John Innes Centre. Photo: Steve Adams

Norfolk Young Musician of the Year winner Alexander Little, left with second place Megan Storerand third place Murray Chapman at the John Innes Centre. Photo: Steve Adams

A 17-year-old pianist from Aylsham has been named 2015’s Norfolk Young Musician.

Norfolk Young Musician of the Year winners at the John Innes Centre. Adjudicator Hannah Perowne pictured with the winners .Photo: Steve AdamsNorfolk Young Musician of the Year winners at the John Innes Centre. Adjudicator Hannah Perowne pictured with the winners .Photo: Steve Adams

Norwich-born violinist Hannah Perowne returned to the city to adjudicate at this year’s event at the John Innes Centre on Sunday.

First prize went to Norwich School pupil Alexander Little, who has won an organ scholarship to Merton College, Oxford.

The former cathedral chorister, who also plays the trumpet, particularly impressed with his performance of Debussy’s L’Isle Joyeuse.

Second prize went to flautist Megan Storer, 17, an East Norfolk Sixth Form College student from Gorleston, who has a place to study at the Trinity College of Music.

Third place was awarded to pianist Murray Chapman, 15, of Thorpe St Andrew.

The Michael Badminton String Prize was awarded to Dylan Latham, 14, a Norwich School pupil from Norwich.

The youngest performer of the 16 musicians who took part, 13-year-old Adam Possener, was awarded the Mrs E Sturgeon Piano Prize. The teenager, whose parents live in Norwich, has a music scholarship at Eton College.

The Aylsham Music Society Prize for the most promising woodwind/brass player went to trumpeter George Jefford, a 16-year-old Gresham’s School pupil from Oulton, near Aylsham.

The event is organised by the Michael Badminton Young Musicians Trust, which supports young string players in Norfolk by assisting with the cost of lessons, purchase of instruments and financial help to attend courses and workshops.

The trust also has a number of valuable string instruments for loan.

Chairman Jonathan Wortley said the trust was extremely pleased that such a prominent violinist as Miss Perowne could return to adjudicate, particularly as she herself began her violin studies with the late Michael Badminton.

Mr Wortley said: “It was a very high standard and it was one of the most difficult we have had to adjudicate in recent years.

“The real factor is whether musicians give a performance and really engage with the audience and convey something to the audience.”

He added: “The competitive element is not the most important thing about the event. It gives young musicians a performance opportunity to play in front of people and get a critique from a professional musician.”

Miss Perowne will be giving a violin master class on Monday, January 12, in the Chapel at Norwich School from 6pm to 8 pm. Admission is free.

1 comment

  • Three students of Norwich School, one of Greshams, one on his way to Eton. Hooray for the one state school East Norfolk Sixth Form College. Musical youth are a result of talent with a very large sprinkling of parents' money. All of these students, even from the state school, would have had numerous lessons from peripatetic music teachers. Is this fair? How many possible talented musicians are out there unable to advance because of the huge cost of music education?

    Report this comment

    alecto

    Tuesday, January 13, 2015

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