Search

Almost 100 children waiting for an education as school expulsions in Norfolk soar

PUBLISHED: 06:30 14 March 2017 | UPDATED: 14:20 14 March 2017

The Locksley School, part of The Short Stay School for Norfolk. Photo : Steve Adams

The Locksley School, part of The Short Stay School for Norfolk. Photo : Steve Adams

Copyright Archant Norfolk 2015

Soaring numbers of pupils being expelled from Norfolk’s schools mean that almost 100 children have fallen through the cracks and are currently missing out on any type of education.

The number of permanent exclusions around the county leapt from 170 in 2013/14 to 195 in 2014/15 and 296 in 2015/16, with 137 children excluded in the autumn term of this year alone.

To recoup costs and act as a disincentive, Norfolk County Council has today confirmed it is considering introducing a penalty charge to "reflect the true cost of exclusions", as parents accuse the system of failing children.

The inflated demand for places at the Short Stay School for Norfolk (SSSfN) - which is contracted by Norfolk County Council to offer places to excluded pupils - means it is bursting at the seams, with children relying on e-learning courses as they wait, sometimes for months, to get back into a classroom.

In November, 41 pupils were on the SSSfN waiting list - but as of today, day seven of our Fighting for Their Futures investigation, there are 96 children waiting to get a school place.

"If you have got a child who is disrupting learning, then it is a moral dilemma. Your head says helping those children would be easier if the disruptive child wasn’t there, but your heart asks what will happen to them."

Anonymous headteacher

MORE: 'We need to get it right at the start' - EDP says chain of factors is behind rise in children without schooling

Des Reynolds, chief executive at the Engage Trust, which runs SSSfN, said the school traditionally reaches bursting point during summer term, but was full by the end of September this year.

"The Engage Trust is deeply concerned with the numbers of young people who are unable to be accommodated in mainstream school provision," he said.

"We know that we have seen significant proportional rises in the numbers of young people with significant challenging behaviour at the youngest ages, but the reasons do not show a clear pattern."

The Locksley School, part of The Short Stay School for Norfolk. Des Reynolds, chief executive of the Engage Trust. Photo : Steve AdamsThe Locksley School, part of The Short Stay School for Norfolk. Des Reynolds, chief executive of the Engage Trust. Photo : Steve Adams

He said the SSSfN would offer an extra 60 places from September, but that a lack of mainstream spots to move children onto meant many were staying longer than planned.

Increasing mental health and behavioural needs have been blamed for the rise, with council figures for 2015/16 showing that persistent disruptive behaviour or physical assault against other pupils were behind the majority of exclusions.

But in Suffolk, figures are much lower - in 2014/15, just 65 pupils were permanently excluded and in Cambridgeshire, none were.

Though details on Norfolk County Council's proposed charge are limited, it may be calculated using cash schools receive per pupil - around £4,500 - and other funding streams.

Roger Smith of Norfolk County Council.  Photo: Bill SmithRoger Smith of Norfolk County Council. Photo: Bill Smith

The policy - which schools will be consulted on in summer - would be run through a proposed Norfolk Inclusion Incentive Fund, which would see the charge reinvested into reintegrating pupils and would include an updated managed moves scheme to help expelled pupils switch schools.

One headteacher, speaking anonymously, said imposing a penalty without offering greater support to schools trying to avoid exclusions was unfair, and said the weight placed on league tables had left heads with a "moral dilemma".

"When we are under such huge pressure to get the results, and when the system of accountability means that if you don't get those results you can be given a coasting school letters, or have forced academisation, that puts headteachers under a huge amount of pressure," they said.

"If you have got a child who is disrupting learning, then it is a moral dilemma. Your head says helping those children would be easier if the disruptive child wasn't there, but your heart asks what will happen to them."

The Locksley School, part of The Short Stay School for Norfolk. Photo: Steve AdamsThe Locksley School, part of The Short Stay School for Norfolk. Photo: Steve Adams

But a spokesperson for Norfolk Primary Headteachers' Association and Norfolk Secondary Education Leaders said pressure to look good in league tables did not influence decisions and instead said more frequent behaviour problems were responsible.

"Permanent exclusions are a last resort," they said. "We are not in the business of wanting to exclude pupils. Schools are judged in a variety of different ways alongside performance, and we have to go through an exhaustive list of interventions before we got to permanent exclusions."

Roger Smith, chairman of the council's children's services committee, said the council was tackling the issue "head-on with a solid plan".

Alongside 60 places at the Engage Trust, he said they will buy another 32 from another provider, though the council could not confirm where the places would be.

 

'Failing our children'

Darren Ward's six-year-old son was permanently excluded from a Norwich primary school in November.

It took 85 days before he was provided a tutor for two hours a week and, despite being told he is fifth on the waiting list, he has been waiting for a place at the SSSfN since.

His mother, who worked for the NHS, initially took leave to stay at home with their son, but lost her job after the weeks turned into months.

The family managed to successfully challenge the appeal, but the school chose to pay a £4,000 fine and uphold the exclusion.

Mr Ward said his son is now at home, waiting to return to education, and said the lack of support was "especially galling" considering how quickly schools impose fines when children are absent from school.

He said there were "reams of parents tearing their hair out" and added: "The system is failing our children".

 

'So much pain and hurt'

One mother said her son was not offered another school place for four months after being excluded from a secondary school in south Norfolk at the start of this school year.

She admits he was disruptive, but she did not expect him to be excluded so soon in September, particularly as he was in his GCSE year.

The school told the mother that her son had hit a teacher. She said a review panel overturned the school's decision to exclude him but the school refused to take him back.

She said since his exclusion he had done little but sat in his room, appeared to be depressed and had lost trust in adults.

"He doesn't want to engage with anybody. I think he has lost trust in all adults, including us as parents," she said. "It has caused us so much pain and hurt."

 

•Have you been affected by permanent exclusions? Email lauren.cope@archant.co.uk

Related articles

49 comments

  • It is disheartening that this is perceived as 'schools failing children' given the endless costly interventions and staff input that will have been tried before getting to the last resort that is permanent exclusion. It is also just plain wrong to say that schools are off-loading pupils who are likely to get bad results. It is unacceptable and extreme behaviour that gets pupils excluded, their results will be bad because they've spent their school lives ruining every lesson they attend. If anything, league tables and statistics force schools to hold on to pupils who are abusive, violent and disruptive for far too long, meanwhile all the other children suffer. Provide more places, get these children into an environment more suitable to their needs and let the good, decent kids have the education they deserve.

    Report this comment

    happilyeverafter

    Saturday, March 18, 2017

  • this situation has arisen because we now have an upper class, a middle class a working class, and a strata we've never had before in society, an 'under class'. in a past life i was called upon to visit hundreds of homes a year, and encountered many of this new social group. often single mothers, with two or more children. she's never worked, never will, the house is a wreck with kicked in doors, ripped carpets, dog hair everywhere (they always have a dog) , and here's the thing, the kids are not at school and have been 'diagnosed' with ADHD. in other words after badgering hard pressed health workers and doctors, the un disciplined offspring were given the diagnosis she wanted,to stop them turning up at the local GP's surgery and creating havoc, also entitling her to have her little darlings collected by taxi every morning, meaning she can spend the day in a dressing gown watching jeremy kyle. ADHD is now almost a badge of honour on the housing estates across the land, it excuses poor parenting and ensures another generation of feral wasters is shown the way to behave to get what they want.as i said, this isn't doorstep gossip, it's a situation i saw with my own eyes on more occasions than i care to recall. i honestly don't have an answer, but it needs to be tackled .

    Report this comment

    blueboy

    Saturday, March 18, 2017

  • The problem being missed by these parents "tearing their hair out" because their precious snowflake has been expelled is that they raised it. Schools can only educate what parents raised and if you raise a brat they need to be expelled and toughies on the parents who did it. You have set your child up to fail. You deserve all that's coming to you. As far as corporal punishment is concerned I believe in it whole heartedly, and I work in schools. When I was a kid we got our butts thrashed when we were disruptive, disrespectful, didn't do homework etc and it's amazing how we didn't have any behavior problems, no disrespect etc, just a lot of happy students who all went on to great futures as moral upstanding citizens

    Report this comment

    Patrick

    Saturday, March 18, 2017

  • @Andy. If discipline was taught at an early stage then it could be nipped in the bud and not go through all age groups. Parents bring up children with values and respect will have better behaved kids. It is the parents responsibility to train their kids, not the school nor the state. The state corrects them. That could be by way of exclusion or in later life incarsaration. I was beaten at school and it taught me not to mess around because there would be consequences if I did. Many children think they are above the law and will square up to an adult because they know they won’t have a finger laid on them. @Monkeynuts. I’ve been a school mentor and am a retired policeman. Children these days have little or no respect for each other or anyone else. We had kids break into a sub-station in the early hours and took them back to their parents every time. They were 7 years old and it’s three in the morning. The inevitable happened and they got electrocuted. Everyone other than the parents were to blame..

    Report this comment

    Only saying..

    Wednesday, March 15, 2017

  • How is it correct that if your child is excluded the parents of that child start demanding how they should be taught. In most cases of an exclusion (not all) there would of been a history of problems which the parents would of been made aware of and again in most cases refused to work with the school to correct. I know people who work in a privately run provision in Great Yarmouth and can not believe what they have to offer these so called problem children. Firstly the children are allowed a taxi to and from the provision. (how much is this coasting the council when most of them come from out of the area and mainly Norwich) Then you've got the expensive activities they do everyday they attend. But on top of all that the general public are not seeing the amount of money these children are costing the tax payer when the provision supply a one to one or two teachers to one child service. You are talking between £300 - £400 per day per child. Do we not think this is encouraging children to be excluded as their mates are having a whale of a time. I know my children would love to do all the wonderful activities these so called problem children do every day

    Report this comment

    Den49

    Wednesday, March 15, 2017

  • Basically, those children who are badly behaved and stop the rest of the class from learning must be removedexpelled! It is unfair for the rest of the children in the class to have their learning compromised. Therefore, there must be more provision set aside for those children who can't comply for behavioural, social or emotional reasons and judging from this report there isn't enough provision being maintained which needs addressing asap! More of these special schools need to be established. Unfortunately a lot of the issues these poor children exhibit is because of poor parenting but also for others, there is a delay in assessing them to ascertain if there is a genuine special learning need.

    Report this comment

    Sarah B

    Tuesday, March 14, 2017

  • Responsibility aversion + inflated sense of entitlement = Trouble.

    Report this comment

    Glum

    Tuesday, March 14, 2017

  • Shook was correct earlier in the thread, we have a growing social problem with many people thinking they can do what they want and dont care what others think, this travels down to their children who in turn behave the same. Build a central school where all the "problem" children attend. Its not the childs fault maybe but we cant train the parents so why should their child be able to disrupt others learning.

    Report this comment

    Jimhow

    Tuesday, March 14, 2017

  • The education system that is no longer fit for purpose. Go to YouTube and search for "RSA ANIMATE: Changing Education Paradigm" to learn why Sir Ken Robinson thinks this too.

    Report this comment

    HomeSchoolJournal

    Tuesday, March 14, 2017

  • @john b- Evening old thing. I'd say your mythical teenagers should have been arrested for damage to property on the first night. They would then be out through the child courts. As for spitting at the guard who chucked them off the train...I'd put that down to high jinx, for all we know the guard was nasty and chucked them out in the middle of nowhere. I fail to see how thumping them would have made any difference. I've answered your question directly, now you can do me the same courtesy. Perhaps you'd care to explain how beating children makes them 'learn their lesson'?

    Report this comment

    Rushallchap3

    Tuesday, March 14, 2017

  • @koenig - Sounds like you are from 1984. “War is peace. Freedom is slavery. Ignorance is strength."

    Report this comment

    HomeSchoolJournal

    Tuesday, March 14, 2017

  • Come on parents, stuff the state sponsored education system. YOU as PARENTS are responsible for the education of your children, stop contracting the responsibility to the government. Start educating your children at home and give them a real life education. Yesterday my children went to learn about crafts, fire and friendship in the middle of a forest and today they went to a proper theatre to do drama. They were not stuck in the four walls of a classroom with 29 other children being talked at and staring out the window.

    Report this comment

    HomeSchoolJournal

    Tuesday, March 14, 2017

  • Jennifer Jane, some of the children who are disruptive cover the full range of ages - 5 upwards. For older children, it is simply no excuse to say they only want to be plumber or whatever. Are those individuals only to be taught what ever profession is deemed to be necessary for their future life? Would you exclude all other subjects and only include a bare minimum of maths and English? If after school and they find something in life that they do not like, do you suggest they are free to do whatever they like, regardless of anyone else or the law?

    Report this comment

    andy

    Tuesday, March 14, 2017

  • Stoneman, your comments are not funny. My youngest daughter had a half brick come through her car window when she was eight months pregnant and my young grandson showered with glass. I wonder if you would be so liberal if it was one of your own?

    Report this comment

    John Bridge

    Tuesday, March 14, 2017

  • John bridge: I'm not going into discussing weather spanking naughty boys is appropriate anymore I have made my opinion known feel free to discuss with Koenig as you both something in common , goodnight.

    Report this comment

    stoneman

    Tuesday, March 14, 2017

  • Stoneman, I have never clobbered my children either but that does not alter the fact there are children who make other peoples lives a misery. The incident on the railway station, what do you think would be a suitable punishment?

    Report this comment

    John Bridge

    Tuesday, March 14, 2017

  • John bridge : dogooders make sick? sorry I've got the same opinion of child beaters , my children never got a hand raised to them and I never had the knock on the door from plod ,my grandkids are now young adults and they were raised to the same standards as their parents and surprise no knocks on the doors either ,look beyond the child .

    Report this comment

    stoneman

    Tuesday, March 14, 2017

  • Stoneman, sorry to go off topic but I think this softly softly attitude is ruining our society. True story, a train at a station is held up because two fourteen year olds who have been chucked off are standing on a footbridge spitting at the guard who is unable to get onto the train. The train eventually leaves and the two teenagers destroy every cycle they can {country station}. The police turned up and tell them off and they go away only to return at night and throw fence wire across the tracks as a train approaches. The wire ends up around several axles and the main line is closed for twelve hours while the train is `skated` out of the way. The cost and disruption because of these little toerags was enormous and do you know what their punishment was? A telling off! Would they and their ilk be so keen on anti social behaviour if they were flogged as in far eastern countries? Do gooders make me sick, they are dragging our country down. Before anyone tells me what a nasty person I am perhaps they could suggest a suitable punishment for aforementioned teenagers.

    Report this comment

    John Bridge

    Tuesday, March 14, 2017

  • Two scenarios, Joe Toerag disrupts a class and makes the teachers life a misery, he probably goes home proud and thinks he is clever that he has dragged everyone down. Now suppose master Toerag gets physical punishment and changes his ways, right or wrong? I like most would be horrified if my children {or grandchildren} were subject to caning but life is not black and white, schools and society in general are too soft, do gooders are a menace.

    Report this comment

    John Bridge

    Tuesday, March 14, 2017

  • John bridge: by beating a child who is disruptive in class does not solve the issue all you get is the teacher or nowadays teaching assistant taking anger out on the kid you have to delve deeper as I have said before look at reasons why the child is a problem . Beating the living daylights out of kids is not acceptable.

    Report this comment

    stoneman

    Tuesday, March 14, 2017

  • I think more socialisation is needed at the preschool age rather than this constant academic grindstone..... I think a lot of the difficulty is with social skills. So many parents are having to both work and have to leave their children with child minders - who have to fill in heaps of paperwork about learning targets.... Where is the social learning in saying descriptive words and counting toys? Not the childminders fault nor the parents fault - Government decisions based purely on data where the wrong questions are being asked? Maybe ....

    Report this comment

    wurley

    Tuesday, March 14, 2017

  • Classrooms need a certain level of discipline, Koenig does have a point. Perhaps Larson and stoneman can tell us how to control pupils that are disruptive and indeed violent.

    Report this comment

    John Bridge

    Tuesday, March 14, 2017

  • Classrooms need a certain level of discipline, Koenig does have a point. Perhaps Larson and stoneman can tell us how to control pupils that are disruptive and indeed violent.

    Report this comment

    John Bridge

    Tuesday, March 14, 2017

  • Perhaps someone should find out why these children are being excluded. Why are they disruptive? Maybe if your dream is to a master craftsman as a joiner, mechanic in the pits at Snetterton or a leading gardener with RHS you can see little point in discussing the works of Shakesphere. Perhaps the introduction of technical schools recently mentioned will help. I have to say studying Henry IV has not really helped me in my career in Financial Services but I am sure the top grade in O Level Maths probably did. It is time the powers that be realised we are educating children who are all different , have different aspirations and therefore one syllabus does not suit all. I hear people saying this all costs but our children are our future and we need to ensure all talents are used to the full. Yes we need the academics but we also need the builders, joiners, bakers, butchers. horticulturists, farmers, musicians and I could go on.

    Report this comment

    jennifer jane

    Tuesday, March 14, 2017

  • Care leavers and school kids being let down by NCC. Surely not. It was all discussed at children's services committee this morning and mostly veiled over. However, some are calling for an urgent investigation I hear. Well, they would be, elections are getting closer and it's purdah in a couple of weeks or so. Their seats are at stake

    Report this comment

    candy

    Tuesday, March 14, 2017

  • Good to see that cycles of failing significant numbers of children with behavioural problems continues. Unfortunately many of these children will end up in the criminal justice system and cost both time and money for many years to come. Meanwhile today's children's services commitee carry on as nothing has happened in respect of last week coverage in the EDP. You would expect questions to be asked and heads to roll. Not a chance. The consensus is this is all fake news and the EDP will in due course publish a full apology! It is remarkable how little support there is from the mainstream political parties for the full scale enquiry which is so clearly required into children's services. Could somebody please explain why the latest head of CS is known as Matt the shredder?

    Report this comment

    Little fish

    Tuesday, March 14, 2017

  • Meanwhile, back in the real world, a disruptive child will disrupt the education of the rest of the class. Anyone who has been a teacher with such a pupil in their class will know just how damaging this can be and often is. Some such pupils are violent towards teachers and other pupils - how can anyone justify that pupil remaining in class. Even where violence does not take place, the behaviour does have an adverse affect on the rest. The answer has to be exclusion but for that child to attend specialist schools where hopefully those issues can be addressed.

    Report this comment

    andy

    Tuesday, March 14, 2017

  • Koenig, what is "measured physical punishment"? Few countries in Europe allow corporal punishment,. There have been many cases of children being injured by adults administering corporal punishment. It didn't work because the recidivism rate was so high. I suggest you read about Derek Slade's approach to corporal punishment at Finborough School in Suffolk. I am always suspicious of those who show such enthusiasm for assaulting someone smaller and less powerful than them.

    Report this comment

    Suffolk Exile

    Tuesday, March 14, 2017

  • Whilst you may disagree with Koenig's views that does not mean they are not permitted to have or to put them forward. You of course can disagree. I believe that the greatest form of child abuse in this country is undertaken by parents who don't seem or care or bather about their children or what they are doing or even seem to want the best for them. No use saying that the child has spent their time in their room since expulsion and they don't like adults now, it's time to get to grips and undertake some parenting and teach your child the rules of life. You don't need to whack them to do that but you do need to be firm.

    Report this comment

    NigelS

    Tuesday, March 14, 2017

  • @Keonig - Can I suggest if you want to spank children you return to Switzerland asap. I understand that in your country an adult striking a child is acceptable. In this country it isn't. We call a fully grown adult striking a child bullying and assault.

    Report this comment

    Rushallchap3

    Tuesday, March 14, 2017

  • Koenig: anyone advocating corporal punishment in 2017 has serious problems. Blame the parent(s) not the child by all means, but your posts are seriously disturbing. We all know the theory of the carrot and the stick, but I cannot believe the to$$ you come out with. I've only commented on two pieces on here today, and you are really scary on both of them.

    Report this comment

    el dingo

    Tuesday, March 14, 2017

  • Why should 1 child ruin the education of a class who on the whole want to learn?I would like to see the parents forced to attend classes when the child starts causing trouble making the parent look after the child inschool allowing the teacher to teach not become a nurse maid to a spoilt little brat.

    Report this comment

    old boy

    Tuesday, March 14, 2017

  • "If your kids are disruptive then expect them to be punished! Why should badly behaved children get one to one tuition? That’s just rewarding them" What a beautifully simplistic world view you must have. A friends a teacher, many "problem" kids are not spoilt, many come from broken homes or homes where one or more parents has disabilities, addictions or needs you obviously haven't considered. But you're right, we should have no sympathy for such kids, punish them some more. Rewarding them just isn't giving all those other kids without a care in the world a fair shot at life.

    Report this comment

    monkeynuts

    Tuesday, March 14, 2017

  • Children being forced down an academic route makes them more employable in the future… If you don’t have basic Maths & English it will be difficult for you.

    Report this comment

    Only saying..

    Tuesday, March 14, 2017

  • If your kids are disruptive then expect them to be punished! Why should badly behaved children get one to one tuition? That’s just rewarding them. Parents should take responsibility for their children. If you bring them up with no guidelines and boundaries then they will get into trouble. It is not the role of the teacher to train your children. They are there to teach them in a safe environment. Why should I, as a tax payer, pick up the cost of training your badly behaved children?

    Report this comment

    Only saying..

    Tuesday, March 14, 2017

  • There are a number of contributory factors to this story. Firstly, poor parenting, and parents who look all over the place to lay the blame for their children's behaviour anywhere but at their own feet. This is not the fact in every case, but in a large number. Secondly, government cuts. The huge cuts in education (don't believe the propaganda pedaled by the government about increased funding) have meant that all schools are underfunded and don't have the capacity to deal with these students. Short Stay places have been hit hard. Finally, and most importantly, the pressure on schools to get exam results is having the biggest impact. If you have a student who is not going to reflect well on a schools figures, they will be excluded a lot sooner than a student acting the same way, but who will have a more positive impact on figures. If schools were monitored on everything they provide, this issue would go away overnight. Progress 8 will make this worse. It was hard enough to get some students through 5 good GCSE's, they now need 8! Don't forget in all of this, the change of curriculum, and ensuring students become more academic. The arts, crafts, practical subjects are becoming sidelined in exchange for more academically based subjects. Some students just aren't cut out for this sort of education. They need a balance, not Mr Gove's utopia. Pupils who, in the past, would have completed less academic, practical subjects, perhaps not even at a GCSE equivalent, are being forced down an academic route, just to hit targets, and yet people are scratching their heads to wonder why we suddenly have so many problems in our education system. Surely (intelligent?) politicians can see the correlation between their policies and the constant drive on exam results, and the huge increase in exclusions, mental health issues, and gaming the system by schools? It's not that difficult is it?

    Report this comment

    OldSchool

    Tuesday, March 14, 2017

  • Koenig,as you said in towards the end of your last essay come down on the parents or mainly the parent as is usually these days as I have observed its the upbringing of the child which is at the root of the problems not the individual ask a lot workers with kids their behaviour problems are generally a cry for help.

    Report this comment

    stoneman

    Tuesday, March 14, 2017

  • "...Corporal punishment is not physical violence, it is measured physical punishment...." . I am still trying to work that one out . Like most advocates of giving children a good thrashing , i suspect you rather enjoy it . Both giving and receiving . Bottoms up !

    Report this comment

    Larson Whipsnade

    Tuesday, March 14, 2017

  • Corporal punishment is not physical violence, it is measured physical punishment. Moreover it is not to simply get a message across, it is a last resort response to unacceptable behaviour, a response that is clear and unambiguous. Use of corporal punishment in schools worked very well for hundreds indeed thousands of years. Despite the whinges from superannuated Snowflakes it did not produce dysfunctional adults, indeed the precise opposite. Without a punishment of last resort that does not result in badly behaved brats effectively (in their view) winning a confrontation by being taken out of the confrontational situation such brats will never become socialised. What should not be forgotten is that a kid that has been expelled for a period or permanently must continue to remain in full time education. This places huge costs on tax payers plus at least a second rate education if the kid is placed in a 'sin school' It also means tgast the kid must not be in a public place during normal school times or the authorities can come down on the parents. Much much better is a sharp crack with a cane when faced with grossly unacceptable behaviour. It works.

    Report this comment

    koenig

    Tuesday, March 14, 2017

  • I disagree with you Koenig using physical violence on a child to get your message across is wrong full stop.

    Report this comment

    stoneman

    Tuesday, March 14, 2017

  • @ stoneman - I disagree. Corporal punishment is effective and far from being wrong when faced with some near feral brat with an attitude and no good side to appeal to. Discipline comes in two parts, clearly defined rules and well understood consequences if the rules are broken. I stand by what I wrote. There are some children for whom physical pain or discomfort is the only language that they understand. It's nothing to do with perversion and everything to do with making people learn from the start that antisocial behaviour is unacceptable and will be dealt with. Mostly the message can be going across in a number of ways but hitting a teacher is a bridge waay too far and excluding is no solution whereas six strokes of a cane delivers a short sharp lesson. Liberal teaching over the last few decades has resulted in deteriating behaviour in schools and later into society. In short it has FAILED and now should be abandoned and what DID work adopted in its place.

    Report this comment

    koenig

    Tuesday, March 14, 2017

  • @Nakita. Welcome back. The shredder?

    Report this comment

    candy

    Tuesday, March 14, 2017

  • Koenig: a grown adult using physical punishment on any child is totally unacceptable on all fronts,please keep your kinks to yourself.

    Report this comment

    stoneman

    Tuesday, March 14, 2017

  • Norfolk schools have a duty to provide under the government SEN legislation. Perhaps it's like the 'Staying Put' legislation designed for care leavers only just being discovered buy Norfolk some years on. Or even perhaps they only find these things when the spotlight hits and things can be concealed no longer. The chair, and deputy chair, of the children's services committee have some explaining to do. Being kept in the dark by officers is no excuse and one has to ask where their questioning and interrogation is. Being a councillor is more than looking important for one's party!

    Report this comment

    candy

    Tuesday, March 14, 2017

  • SHOOK - I think is about Academies and payments by results - so if a child is not likely to get good enough grades then the child gets excluded and becomes a problem for Children's Services. Also the failure by NCC to build schools for children with additional needs is something else Sister Wendy et al should be ashamed of.

    Report this comment

    Nakita Ponnly

    Tuesday, March 14, 2017

  • Restore corporal punishment. Physical pain is the only language that some children understand.

    Report this comment

    koenig

    Tuesday, March 14, 2017

  • The interesting question has to be why have school expulsions soared ? Do we have a growing social problem or is it be a change in schooling policy towards ' disruptive ' pupils ?

    Report this comment

    SHOOK

    Tuesday, March 14, 2017

  • Interesting that the LA is not adhering to what the SEN Code of Practice states at 11.58: Local authorities have a duty to arrange suitable, full-time education for pupils of compulsory school age who would not otherwise receive such education, including from the sixth day of a permanent exclusion. Schools have a duty to arrange suitable, full-time education from the sixth day of a fixed period exclusion (see Chapter 10, paragraphs 10.47 to 10.52 on alternative provision). Suitable education means efficient education suitable to a child’s age, ability and aptitude and to any SEN the child may have.

    Report this comment

    Bea

    Tuesday, March 14, 2017

  • Parents should take hope that these exclusions were simply short statistical aberrations and the issue is historic ..... well that is what Roger I am leaving in May and Matt the shredder from Oz have told us about the performance of Children's Services.

    Report this comment

    Nakita Ponnly

    Tuesday, March 14, 2017

The views expressed in the above comments do not necessarily reflect the views of this site

0

Most Read

Newsletter Sign Up

Sign up to receive our regular email newsletter

Most Commented

Latest from the EDP

Partly Cloudy

Partly Cloudy

max temp: 11°C

min temp: 6°C

Listen to the latest weather forecast
HOT JOBS

Show Job Lists

Digital Edition

cover

Enjoy the EDP
digital edition

Subscribe