The £50,000 pint of beer is brought to Norwich

Assistant Chief Constable Charlie Hall, left, and area manager for the Fire Service, Stuart Horth, with the £50,000 pint which represents the personal financial cost of drink-driving. Picture: Denise Bradley Assistant Chief Constable Charlie Hall, left, and area manager for the Fire Service, Stuart Horth, with the £50,000 pint which represents the personal financial cost of drink-driving. Picture: Denise Bradley

Saturday, March 16, 2013
4:19 PM

If the potentially lethal and tragic consequences of drink-driving were not already clear to some drivers, a new campaign is warning people exactly what it could cost them.

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Assistant Chief Constable Charlie Hall, centre; area manager for the Fire Service, Stuart Horth, right; and Chief Inspector, Chris Spinks, with the £50,000 pint which represents the personal financial cost of drink-driving. Picture: Denise BradleyAssistant Chief Constable Charlie Hall, centre; area manager for the Fire Service, Stuart Horth, right; and Chief Inspector, Chris Spinks, with the £50,000 pint which represents the personal financial cost of drink-driving. Picture: Denise Bradley

A touring £50,000 pint of beer was brought to the Forum in Norwich as part of Norfolk Police and the Department for Transport’s latest Think campaign.

The costly pint represents the personal financial cost of drink-driving, which has been calculated for the first time by the Institute of Advanced Motorists, taking fines, legal costs, rise in insurance premiums and possible job losses into consideration.

The £50,000 pint visited the Forum on Friday, with assistant chief constable Charlie Hall, who has responsibility for leading roads policing across Norfolk and Suffolk, saying: “It takes just a few moments to consume enough alcohol to be over the limit – but the consequences of drink-driving stay with you for life.

“During the Norfolk and Suffolk Christmas drink-drive campaign, 171 drivers gave positive breath tests and each one found guilty at court will have received a conviction that will affect their job prospects, a driving ban and a fine or custodial sentence.

“Some will have been injured in collisions they caused when drunk, or may have injured others as a result of drinking and driving.”

Alec Byrne, chairman of the Norfolk casualty reduction partnership, added: “Our message is simple; if you drink any alcohol make sure you are not driving. The dangers of drink driving are all too obvious.

“What is perhaps not so obvious is that if you drink and drive you are not only risking your life and the lives of others but even if you are lucky and don’t have a serious accident you still risk being disqualified from driving if you are caught.

“That in itself has serious consequences and could impact on your job, relationship and finances. It quite simply isn’t worth it.”

Are you planning an event in Norwich? Contact reporter David Freezer on 01603 772418 or david.freezer@archant.co.uk

15 comments

  • I once read a precis of a research paper into the difference in the effect on the brain, perceptions, reaction times etc between x amount of alcohol remaining in the blood stream after consuming a greater amount a lengthy time previously and the same x amount of alcohol a short time after consumption. The conclusion was that the alcohol residual after a lengthy time had less effect than the same amount recently consumed. I suspect this is not something that safety campaigners want muddying the waters of testing for safe limits, maybe the research was discredited, but no one seems to recognise the possibility when raising the question of zero limits.

    Report this comment

    Daisy Roots

    Monday, March 18, 2013

  • Unless of course you're headmistress, high ranking police officer, blah, blah.Nowt happens to those on the public purse.

    Report this comment

    nrg

    Saturday, March 16, 2013

  • How long will it take to make government see the answer is the zero limit.If you do not drink.No problem.if you do you have a problem.Alcohol stays in your bloodstream for about 24 hours so a session the night before you are over the limit still the following day.Australia have been doing this for years and things have improved as a result

    Report this comment

    Peter Watson

    Saturday, March 16, 2013

  • DR, once again you never use a word when a paragraph will do! The conclusion of the study simply confirms that alcohol is metabolised, therefore the amount in the body and its effects reduce with time. BTW, what on Earth is 'a lengthy time'? Captain Oates "I may be gone a lengthy time."

    Report this comment

    Thoreauwasright

    Monday, March 18, 2013

  • Do the two men in the top picture have a back problem or is something happening off camera to give them both a silly grin?

    Report this comment

    Thoreauwasright

    Sunday, March 17, 2013

  • Mr Watson, one cannot have a zero limit as the body produces alcohol in its digestive processes.

    Report this comment

    micklynn

    Monday, March 18, 2013

  • Never mind about using scare tactics, get some traffic cops out there policing our damned roads. Are you listening Steven Bett?

    Report this comment

    John L Norton

    Saturday, March 16, 2013

  • That's fine Nexus_6 but who's going to catch them? If they don't have an accident and other than xmas time they can flout the law as much as they like.

    Report this comment

    John L Norton

    Sunday, March 17, 2013

  • Apologies for the double post I am very anti drink driving, never drink before driving and am mindful of the residual levels of alcohol But I have never been able to understand, if drink driving is such a problem ,why random breath tests of pub and restaurant customers pulling out of car parks is not allowed. I would support it.And more traffic cops looking for bad driving not just speed traps.

    Report this comment

    Daisy Roots

    Monday, March 18, 2013

  • With the cost of fuel and beer these days I surprised anyone can afford to Drink and Drive.

    Report this comment

    CllrJohnCowan

    Saturday, March 16, 2013

  • I once read a precis of a research paper into the difference in the effect on the brain, perceptions, reaction times etc between x amount of alcohol remaining in the blood stream after consuming a greater amount a lengthy time previously and the same x amount of alcohol a short time after consumption. The conclusion was that the alcohol residual after a lengthy time had less effect than the same amount recently consumed. I suspect this is not something that safety campaigners want muddying the waters of testing for safe limits, maybe the research was discredited, but no one seems to recognise the possibility when raising the question of zero limits.

    Report this comment

    Daisy Roots

    Monday, March 18, 2013

  • All the warnings and all the crackdowns have no effect whatsoever with those arrogant people who think they can get away with it.How about some tougher penalties,like a minimum one year ban,and having to have a retest before driving again.And a good deterrent might be that drink drivers wil have their cars crushed,as well as the ban.But of course the only option should be the zero option,drink OR drive.Why will the government not implement this option,like immediately? I could not imagine anyone voting against it.

    Report this comment

    Nexus_6

    Sunday, March 17, 2013

  • John L Norton is correct , the answer is more traffic cops .The hard core of drinkers cannot be reasoned with . The other group are youngsters , who are egged on by their peers . This campaign is useless .

    Report this comment

    dragonfly

    Saturday, March 16, 2013

  • Also, Mr. Watson, alcohol does not necessarily 'stay in your bloodstream for about 24 hours', it depends on a great number of factors but a reasonable estimate is that it takes about an hour to metabolise one unit so after five pints of an average strength (4.5%) beer you will be likely to still have alcohol in your bloodstream after 12 hours. Having said that, I agree that the only sensible approach is 'Don't drink and drive'.

    Report this comment

    Thoreauwasright

    Monday, March 18, 2013

  • Just ask youself, why is there a legal limit? It encourages a person to have a drink, not know what their tolerance to alcohol is, and is of course a welcome addition to the police funds when charged and fined. The answer is plain and simple, no tolerance at all, do not drink and drive, the punishment is simple too, loss of licence AND vehicle. If you want to keep drunk drivers off the road , that is the easiest method I know of!!

    Report this comment

    canuk

    Saturday, March 16, 2013

The views expressed in the above comments do not necessarily reflect the views of this site

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