The detective who led the investigation into the death of Alisa Dmitrijeva last night made a heartfelt plea to anyone who knows what happened to the 17-year-old to break their silence in a bid to solve the case.

To send a link to this page to a friend, you must be logged in.

Detective Chief Inspector Jes Fry was speaking after it was confirmed no further action will be taken against the two men who were arrested in connection with the death of the Latvian-born teenager whose remains were found on the Sandringham estate on New Year’s Day.

The decision that there is “insufficient evidence to prosecute anyone for any offences at this time” means the mystery of what happened to Alisa, who disappeared from her home in Wisbech last year, and the heartache of her family will now go on.

But Det Ch Insp Fry, who admitted he was frustrated and personally disappointed not to be able to offer the family closure, hoped it would not be the end of the story.

He said: “This will not now be solved by forensic evidence, we’ve exhausted that line and key to this is someone who has knowledge of what happened being able to give us that knowledge and be willing to give evidence and we will look for that opportunity when it arises.”

The family have recently returned from Latvia where they remembered Alisa in a traditional ceremony around her grave a year after she disappeared, and were obviously “disappointed” to hear the news.

Det Ch Insp Fry said: “They’re obviously upset but understand that it has been a very difficult inquiry. They understand we’ve done everything we possibly could and have been very supportive.

“It has been frustrating. There has been evidence enough to arrest people and interview them in relation to the death of Alisa, but after much consideration by the Crown Prosecution Service a decision has been made that there isn’t enough evidence to support a prosecution for any offences in relation to her death.

“It’s very frustrating because we’ve got a huge amount of information, a huge amount of evidence, applied different types of science to try and bring this to a positive conclusion.

“If we can find any new evidence - the case will never be closed - we will do our very best to progress it.”

The matter will now be referred to Norfolk coroner William Armstrong who will set a date for an inquest.

Following the discovery by a dog walker at 4pm on January 1, a DNA profile and palm print later identified the remains as those of Alisa, who was reported missing from Wisbech on September 6 last year.

Alisa, who was due to enrol on a beautician course at the College of West Anglia on September 1 last year, was last seen in King’s Lynn on August 31.

She was born in Latvia in 1994 and moved to the UK with her family in 2009.

Anyone with information should call police on 101.

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Norfolk Weather

Partly Cloudy

Partly Cloudy

max temp: 17°C

min temp: 10°C

Five-day forecast

loading...

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT