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Long hot summer and football world cup in Russia behind rise in 999 calls to Norfolk Police

PUBLISHED: 22:46 30 September 2018 | UPDATED: 22:46 30 September 2018

England goalkeeper Jordan Pickford celebrates victory after the FIFA World Cup, Quarter Final match at the Samara Stadium. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Saturday July 7, 2018. See PA story WORLDCUP Sweden. Photo credit should read: Owen Humphreys/PA Wire. RESTRICTIONS: Editorial use only. No commercial use. No use with any unofficial 3rd party logos. No manipulation of images. No video emulation.

England goalkeeper Jordan Pickford celebrates victory after the FIFA World Cup, Quarter Final match at the Samara Stadium. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Saturday July 7, 2018. See PA story WORLDCUP Sweden. Photo credit should read: Owen Humphreys/PA Wire. RESTRICTIONS: Editorial use only. No commercial use. No use with any unofficial 3rd party logos. No manipulation of images. No video emulation.

PA Wire

The football world cup in Russia and one of the hottest summers for decades are among the reasons police saw a rise in the number of 999 calls received by police.

Chief Constable Simon Bailey at Norfolk Constabulary Headquarters, Wymondham. Photo : Steve AdamsChief Constable Simon Bailey at Norfolk Constabulary Headquarters, Wymondham. Photo : Steve Adams

Traditionally during the summer months calls into the Contact and Control Room (CCR) increase significantly with the force receiving on average 969 phone calls every day.

Norfolk Police have seen a 20pc rise in 999 calls over the past three years, with this year’s peak in July when there were 11,082 calls – an increase of 1,745 from the previous year.

Chief constable Simon Bailey said: “We’ve had an exceptionally busy summer.

“We’ve had to deal with the World Cup, with the visit of the president of the USA and we’ve had one of the hottest summer’s of the last three decades.

“That has led to an increase in the number of 999 calls we’ve received.

“However we’ve responded to the increase in demand.”

The force launched a new telephony system earlier this year which enables control room staff to identify and prioritise the most important calls that come through on the 101 number.

Mr Bailey said this meant that anyone calling about domestic violence, for example, had their call “answered very quickly” while those calling about other more administrative matters had to wait longer.

He said the force was ensuring it maintained its focus on “managing threat, harm and risk”.

People were also being encouraged to contact police via email or online for other matters rather than using 999.

In a bid to reduce demand on the 101 number by helping to put resources where they are needed the most, the force has redesigned its website to make it easier for people to report non-urgent crimes and issues.

There are self-service online forms for a number of different areas, including retail theft, theft, criminal damage, hate incident/crime, incidents which have been caught on a dash cam or mobile phone, non-injury road traffic collison and anti-social behaviour.

The website also helps people find an alternative agency to contact for non-police matters.

Visit www.norfolk.police.uk to find out more about the different options for contacting police.

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