Controversial modern farmhouse application for Blakeney countryside turned down

A view of the Glaven Valley from Bridgefoot Lane, Wiveton, which the Glaven Valley Protection Group fears would be spoilt if the farmhouse application is approved. Picture: SUBMITTED. A view of the Glaven Valley from Bridgefoot Lane, Wiveton, which the Glaven Valley Protection Group fears would be spoilt if the farmhouse application is approved. Picture: SUBMITTED.

Friday, September 5, 2014
4:14 PM

Countryside campaigners are overjoyed after plans for a contemporary-style “farmstead” in a north Norfolk Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB) were refused today.

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Blakeney Parish Council chairman, Tony Faulkner. PHOTO: ANTONY KELLYBlakeney Parish Council chairman, Tony Faulkner. PHOTO: ANTONY KELLY

Some 11 members of the North Norfolk District Council development committee voted to reject the application to build a two-and-a-half storey family home with five bedrooms at Three Owls Farms, Saxlingham Road, Blakeney.

The proposal, put forward by north Norfolk resident Kathy Cargill, was recommended for approval by council planning officers and conservation experts and backed by English Heritage. Two councillors voted against the refusal.

There were 170 letters of objection sent to the authority about the scheme which would have seen a 1950s bungalow, outbuildings and barn on the site demolished.

Objectors, including Wiveton and Blakeney parish councils, feared the design would set a precedent for more modern homes along that part of the coast and contravened council planning policies designed to protect the area; would adversely impact on the AONB, Glaven Valley and surrounding heritage buildings; and it was too large and not a replacement of the old buildings.

Godfrey Sayers, chairman of Wiveton Parish Council and the Glaven Valley Protection Group.Godfrey Sayers, chairman of Wiveton Parish Council and the Glaven Valley Protection Group.

Committee member Richard Shepherd said: “We are the last line of defence in north Norfolk. This is not just an AONB, this is an iconic part of north Norfolk so we have to be careful.

“This is a plan with breathtaking arrogance and drives a tank through current planning laws. The design is very reminiscent of an open prison. The mass footprint and design is all wrong. It would certainly set a precedent.”

Planning officers recommended approval because the new home would not detract from the special qualities of the AONB; would not harm the character of the Glaven Valley conservation area or other heritage assets; and would not result in a disproportionately large increase in the height or scale of the original home.

Keith Schilling, the applicant’s partner, said they were mindful of local feeling and had written to everyone who objected to visit the farm, but no-one took up the offer.

He described the current buildings and site as an “eyesore” and said one part of the new L-shaped home would be 9.5 feet higher than the current bungalow.

The other two would be the same height and only one third of the development would be visible to the Glaven Valley.

He said: “We are a north Norfolk family who are passionate about this property. We feel privileged to be here and hope to enhance this site.”

Part of the application included creating hedgerows, heathland to encourage wildlife.

At the end of the discussion Mr Schilling said the couple would appeal the decision.

Godfrey Sayers, chairman of Wiveton Parish Council and the Glaven Valley Protection Group, said: “I’m overjoyed. Common sense and the spirit of the place has prevailed.”

Tony Faulkner, chairman of Blakeney Parish Council, said people would be relieved because there was a lot of worry about the scheme.

The plans were refused because the size and location of the farmstead would increase its impact on the countryside and its appearance would detract from the special qualities of the AONB and have an adverse impact on the Glaven Valley.

What do you think about the application and its refusal? Email sophie.wyllie@archant.co.uk

2 comments

  • Well done Godfrey and NNDC council members for such a wise decision. Now the best solution for this North Norfolk Family, planning to appeal the verdict, is to come up with a complete revision of the building plan with a much lower architectural height. Should make everyone happy by preserving the AONB ;-)

    Add your comment | Report this comment

    FreddyOman

    Saturday, September 6, 2014

  • Well done the council. Buildings should be kept traditional in areas like this.

    Add your comment | Report this comment

    Johnny Norfolk

    Friday, September 5, 2014

The views expressed in the above comments do not necessarily reflect the views of this site

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