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Commemorating Norfolk’s craftspeople from over the years

PUBLISHED: 17:00 18 March 2017

Edward Green glass blowing. Photo: Archant Library

Edward Green glass blowing. Photo: Archant Library

Glass with class: A profile of some of the craftspeople from our archives

Sarah Bristow with a stained glass window. Photo: Archant Library Sarah Bristow with a stained glass window. Photo: Archant Library

1. Sarah Bristow with one of her stained glass windows, dated 26th March 1990.

Jonathon Mulley and Peter Campling at Harleston Church. Photo: Archant Library Jonathon Mulley and Peter Campling at Harleston Church. Photo: Archant Library

2. Jonathon Mulley and Peter Campling installing the stained glass window, designed by Paul Quail at Harleston Church, dated 15th August 1990.

G. King & Son, lead glaziers, of Norwich restoring 14th century stained glass windows. Photo: Archant Library G. King & Son, lead glaziers, of Norwich restoring 14th century stained glass windows. Photo: Archant Library

3. G. King & Son, lead glaziers, of Norwich, were restoring 14th century stained glass windows. Stained glass artist Paul Jefferies puts the finishing touches to a panel from a window of Merton College, Oxford, dated 28th November 1977.

Jim Munnelly shaping glass. Photo: Archant Library Jim Munnelly shaping glass. Photo: Archant Library

4. Jim Munnelly snips the glob of molton glass as he fashions the base of the first item to be made in his glass factory, dated 19th August 1985.

Diamond point glass engraving demonstrated by Mr. Bryan Lansdell. Photo: Archant Library Diamond point glass engraving demonstrated by Mr. Bryan Lansdell. Photo: Archant Library

5. The old and rare art of diamond point glass engraving is being demonstrated by Mr. Bryan Lansdell who was staging an exhibition with two other artists at the Assembly House, dated 10th June 1975.

Glassmaker Mr. Paul Miller at work. Photo: Archant Library Glassmaker Mr. Paul Miller at work. Photo: Archant Library

6. Glassmaker Mr. Paul Miller at work on one of his windows, dated 26th August 1981.

Stephen Ward glass sculpting. Photo: Archant Library Stephen Ward glass sculpting. Photo: Archant Library

7. Stephen Ward of Carleton Road shows his skill at glass sculpting, dated 11th April 1993.

Part of the stained glass window from the chapel of Oxburgh Hall. Photo: Archant Library Part of the stained glass window from the chapel of Oxburgh Hall. Photo: Archant Library

8. Part of the stained glass window from the chapel of Oxburgh Hall, incorporating the Bedingfield heraldry, which is being renovated by the Norwich firm of G. King & Son, lead glaziers, dated December 1963.

Mr Dennis King (right) talking with his brother Eric. Photo: Archant Library Mr Dennis King (right) talking with his brother Eric. Photo: Archant Library

9. Mr Dennis King (right) discusses with his brother Eric panels which came from The Deanery in the Close, now forming part of the glazing of St. Andrew’s Chapel, Norwich. The 16th century heraldic glass is now being rearranged and releaded, dated 9th June 1961.

Twelve stained glass windows being fitted at Erpingham church. Photo: Archant Library Twelve stained glass windows being fitted at Erpingham church. Photo: Archant Library

10. Twelve stained glass windows are being fitted at Erpingham church in late September, 1955. The panels of late medieval Flemish glass were acquired by an 18th century Earl of Buckinghamshire to embellish the grand staircase of his home, Blickling Hall. They were removed in the 1930s, found 20 years later by the rector, Rev PS Raby, in an outhouse at the hall, restored and bequeathed to Erpingham church by the National Trust, dated 30th September 1955.

Edward Green glass blowing. Photo: Archant Library Edward Green glass blowing. Photo: Archant Library

11. The glass bottle stoppers factory in Cobholm, Yarmouth belonged to the Green family and was based on High Mill Road. The man blowing the glass is Edward Green in 1954, believed to be the last craftsman in the country making glass stoppers by hand. The Greens had been making stoppers in the town since 1899 and the business closed in 1957. They had another small works in St Julian Road, Caister. The broken glass is known as cullet. Some stoppers were blown, others moulded.

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