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Anglo-Saxon artefacts found in Norfolk declared as Treasure

PUBLISHED: 07:00 29 November 2016

Tom Lucking.
 Picture: ANTONY KELLY

Tom Lucking. Picture: ANTONY KELLY

Archant Norfolk 2015

A collection of artefacts discovered in an Anglo-Saxon grave in Norfolk have been declared as Treasure, an inquest has heard.

One of the Anglo-Saxon artefacts discovered near Diss by Tom Lucking and Stuart Isaacs that was found to be Treasure. Photo: Tom Lucking. One of the Anglo-Saxon artefacts discovered near Diss by Tom Lucking and Stuart Isaacs that was found to be Treasure. Photo: Tom Lucking.

University of East Anglia student Tom Lucking and his friend Stuart Isaacs made the discovery between December 21 2014 and January 7, 2015.

The inquest in Norwich yesterday heard that the historical items were found near Diss and that a report from the British Museum described them as “an assemblage of artefacts most probably deriving from an early Anglo-Saxon female furnished burial.”

Among the items are a Merovingian coin pendant, two gold biconical spacer beads, a gold openwork pendant with the form of a Maltese cross, a coin pendant with a gold suspension loop, another pendant with a Maltese cross design, a continental pottery biconical bowl, an iron knife and a collection of copper alloy chatelaine rings.

Area Coroner Yvonne Blake said that she found the items were Treasure under the Treasure Act 1996.

One of the Anglo-Saxon artefacts discovered near Diss by Tom Lucking and Stuart Isaacs that was found to be Treasure. Photo: Tom Lucking. One of the Anglo-Saxon artefacts discovered near Diss by Tom Lucking and Stuart Isaacs that was found to be Treasure. Photo: Tom Lucking.

Speaking after the inquest, Mr Lucking, who along with Mr Isaacs had been exploring the area near Diss with the landowner’s permission when they made the discovery, said it had been “completely expected” that the items would be found to be Treasure.

Mr Lucking, who has been a metal detector enthusiast for more than a decade, said: “We knew when we found them they would be classed as Treasure because they were gold and Anglo-Saxon.”

He said now that the items have been declared Treasure they legally become property of the Crown and they will go before the Treasure Valuation Committee at the British Museum. Mr Lucking and Mr Isaacs are expected to share half of the value and the landowner is expected to receive the other half.

When asked where he hoped the collection of artefacts would end up, Mr Lucking said: “I think the suggestion has always been it should end up at Norwich Castle which is the best place for it because it keeps it in the county for people to see.”

• A second treasure inquest held in Norwich yesterday heard that a post Medieval silver finger ring was found by Steven Hammond in the county. It was believed to date from 1600-1700 AD. The ring was found to be Treasure by Area Coroner Yvonne Blake.

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