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A long heritage of the fishing economy is still celebrated in Sheringham 
and Cromer

PUBLISHED: 17:12 18 October 2017 | UPDATED: 18:28 18 October 2017

Crabs being measured for size by fishermen, Philip Grahame Everitt (right) and Richard Davis retired coxswain of Cromer lifeboat.  pic taken 18th april 1975   c12043    pic to be used in edp dml 27th august 2009

Crabs being measured for size by fishermen, Philip Grahame Everitt (right) and Richard Davis retired coxswain of Cromer lifeboat. pic taken 18th april 1975 c12043 pic to be used in edp dml 27th august 2009

Fishing has always been one of the mainstays of the north Norfolk economy, and these archive photographs show how much it has featured in the region’s daily life.

Places  -   C
Occupations

Whelk fishing at Cromer
Dated  23rd November 1954

Photograph  C1709    N. Taylor Places - C Occupations Whelk fishing at Cromer Dated 23rd November 1954 Photograph C1709 N. Taylor

The crab has always been associated with Cromer and the lobster with Sheringham, and the rivalry between the coastal towns is still intense.

Legendary worldwide for their sweet flavour, Cromer crabs, served up in a crusty brown-bread sandwich, have been a prized Norfolk delicacy for decades. Renowned for their delicate flavour and their higher proportion of white meat to dark, an early guidebook, published in 1800, mentions that “lobsters, crabs, whiting, cod-fish and herring are all caught here in the finest perfection”.

By 1887, there were 450 men and 94 boys fishing for a living in Sheringham and Cromer. The beaches to the east and west of Cromer pier were crowded with fishing boats, and there were once 150 crabbing boats 
in Cromer.

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