Search

Arteon guns for premium rivals

PUBLISHED: 14:30 29 August 2017 | UPDATED: 14:30 29 August 2017

Good-looking Volkswagen Arteon premium saloon stands out from the crowd. Picture: Volkswagen

Good-looking Volkswagen Arteon premium saloon stands out from the crowd. Picture: Volkswagen

Volkswagen

The Arteon is an all-new premium saloon from Volkswagen which replaces the CC. Has it done the job? Jack Evans finds out.

Stylish and practical Volkswagen Arteon has a 563-litre boot. Picture: Volkswagen Stylish and practical Volkswagen Arteon has a 563-litre boot. Picture: Volkswagen

What’s new?

The Arteon is an all-new premium saloon car designed by Volkswagen to sit above its popular Passat as its new flagship.

It offers a sporting drive, an impressive amount of autonomous technology, room for five people and a 563-litre boot – so it’s a practical, good-looking all-rounder. Set to arrive in dealerships this month, the Arteon stands out from the crowd.

Interior shows good build quality but lacks premium flair. Picture: Volkswagen Interior shows good build quality but lacks premium flair. Picture: Volkswagen

Looks and image

With sculpted lines and a large chrome grille, it’s a distinctly premium vehicle, while large 20in alloy wheels fitted to our test car increase its road presence.

The solidly-made cabin has plenty of soft-touch materials, giving an upmarket feel, but it’s hardly exciting, although silver metal finishers do lift it. The large infotainment system, premiered on the new Golf, is a breeze to use and looks good.

Everything feels well made, and will stand up to the test of time, but the cabin lacks the level of flair you’d expect from a premium model.

Space and practicality

Impressive legroom, front and back, is a trump card, making it an ideal long-distance cruiser. The seats are very comfortable and there’s plenty of storage.

That sloping roofline puts headroom at a premium, even for average-height passengers, but you can seat three in the back.

The accommodating 563-litre boot rises to an impressive 1,557 litres with the back seats folded. It’s very square so ideal for suitcases although a relatively wide lip could make loading trickier than usual.

Behind the wheel

The steering has decent weight, especially in sport mode, but can feel light at higher speeds. The car’s sheer size means it can feel a little ungainly on narrow roads.

The ride errs on the firm side, a by-product of the large alloy wheels. It dealt with rutted, potholed roads well but felt a touch too stiff at times.

Refinement is excellent, with wind and road noise at a minimum, making the driving experience relaxing so the Arteon is a good cross-country car.

Available in Elegance and R-Line trims – the latter has a lower ride height and standard adjustable dampers.

Initially there are turbo charged 280PS 2.0-litre petrol and 150 and 240PS 2.0-litre diesel engines, the more powerful ones with all-wheel drive and seven-speed automatic gearboxes. They will be joined by petrol 150PS 1.5-litre TSI Evo, with economy-boosting cylinder deactivation technology, and 190PS 2.0-litre TSI units.

Who would buy one?

The Arteon would suit the driver who looks at all of the primary options in this segment and fancies something completely different. The price is quite high but build quality more than lives up to it.

SPEC AND TECH

Price: £34,305 to £39,955 initially

Engine: 2.0-litre, 240PS, four-cylinder BiTurbo diesel

Performance: 0-62mph 6.5 seconds; top speed 152mph

MPG: 47.9 combined

CO2 emissions: 152g/km

Live Traffic Map

Motoring supplements

Drive24 Cover
Overcast

Overcast

max temp: 3°C

min temp: 2°C

Motors Jobs

Show Job Lists

Meet the Editor

Andy Russell

Andy Russell

Email | Twitter

EDP motoring editor, journalist who loves wheels and engines but hates cleaning them.

Most Read