Photo gallery: Sad scenes show the end of an era for the region’s railway network

Great Yarmouth's Beach Station presents a trackless and desolate scene.
 The station was a terminus of the Great Yarmouth and Stalham Light Railway on Nelson Road. The railway was coastline and included stops at Caister-On-Sea, Ormesby, Hemsby, Martham, Potter Heigham, Catfield, Stalham and North Walsham. 
The area was turned into a coach station/ park in 1962.
 
Dated  11 June 1959 Great Yarmouth's Beach Station presents a trackless and desolate scene. The station was a terminus of the Great Yarmouth and Stalham Light Railway on Nelson Road. The railway was coastline and included stops at Caister-On-Sea, Ormesby, Hemsby, Martham, Potter Heigham, Catfield, Stalham and North Walsham. The area was turned into a coach station/ park in 1962. Dated 11 June 1959

Sunday, July 20, 2014
2:13 PM

The network of familiar and cherished railway stations that crossed our Eastern Counties was fatally disrupted in the late 1950s and early 60s by the progressive closure of many branch lines and stations. EDP photographers have captured the pathos of closed waiting rooms, torn-up track and ticketless booking offices - and also, in some cases, the chance of renewed life for some station buildings which were being converted into homes.

To send a link to this page to a friend, you must be logged in.

• If you recognise anyone in the pictures or would like to tell us more about them you can email rosemary.dixon@archant.co.uk

• To get a copy of one of our old photographs, visit www.edp24.co.uk/buyaphoto or telephone Diane Townsend Mon-Fri on 01603 772449. The photos will be available on the website from Monday afternoon.

3 comments

  • Just goes to show the devastation that short sighted ,inept politicians can cause. What a different Norfolk there would be today if all these wonderful stations were still active. Have politicians ever got anything right ?

    Add your comment | Report this comment

    norman hall

    Thursday, July 24, 2014

  • In many locations such as Hopton between Lowestoft and Yarmouth, residental accomodation has been built close to where railway once was. The increase in the population of locations such as Hopton, where the tracks were soon removed following closure, means that the need for a railway is greater now than ever. As for Yarmouth, the town has never recovered following the closure of two of the town's railway stations, one of which had a direct link to London.

    Add your comment | Report this comment

    Port Watcher

    Tuesday, July 22, 2014

  • The closing of the M and G N was one of the worst mistakes any politician could have made, at least the line could have been preserved,but was pulled up with almost indecent haste! The Victorians left us with a safe,efficient way of moving people and goods around, and we are now left with inadequate roads,and a rail system that is a shadow of its former self!

    Add your comment | Report this comment

    Harry Rabinowitz

    Monday, July 21, 2014

The views expressed in the above comments do not necessarily reflect the views of this site



loading...

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT