Bosses at King’s Lynn’s Palm Paper are in a flap over how to remove 60 Canadian geese which pose a health and safety threat to their equipment and staff.

To send a link to this page to a friend, you must be logged in.

The firm has recruited an agency to catch the birds and transfer them to another site but with so many non-native birds around their site, bosses admit this could take a “long time”.

And with the threat of the geese flying into the path of lorries or crashing into machinery, a cull was not ruled out last night if the “pests” can’t be caught.

Mick Becketts, human resources director at Palm Paper, said: “We had a similar problem last year. We had two families of geese then and netting was used to remove them but this year we have more than 60 birds.

“It’s not our preferred option to pointlessly cull the geese. We want to remove them to another marshland site where they can get on with their lives and we can get on with ours and never see each other again.”

One of the planning conditions for the mill, which opened in 2009, was to look after a seven hectare wildlife reserve for native species which, according to the Norfolk Wildlife Trust, is thriving. Palm Paper would also have to apply to Natural England for a licence if they wanted to cull the geese.

Mr Becketts continued: “Last year the geese were in such a small area that it was easy to remove them.

“But we have an 110 acre site here and there are 70 acres which are ideal for them and they are spread out across our site so it will be difficult to net them.

“We have vehicles travelling around the site throughout the day and a lot of machinery and if any geese were to fly into equipment or lorries then it would not only be dangerous for them but also for our employees.

“Another method we considered was using audio devices but this would impact other wildlife including the Marsh harrier population on site.”.”

He added: “We have got an agency coming in over the next couple of weeks to have a look.

“If we notice any changes in flight patterns or if they are not flying at all, then we will get them is sooner to remove all of them but we could be in for a long wait.”

He added: “We want to get the number of Canadian geese down to a more manageable number without shooting them.

“To stop us having so many geese next year, we will cut back the grass on areas around our site excluding the dedicated wildlife reserve.”

The site boasts a large grassing area at the front of the building as well as a grand reedbed which is visited by a Norfolk Wildlife Trust volunteer every Saturday.

John Hiskett, conservation officer at the trust, said: “We had meetings with them about managing the wildlife site they own but have nothing recorded about this problem. We discussed a variety of things at these informal meetings but the trust would not suggest or advise a cull.”

12 comments

  • The Geese will still be here long after the plague known as mankind is gone.

    Report this comment

    mslucy22033

    Saturday, June 2, 2012

  • No problems as negotiations are under way to find a new home for them. NCC is joining forces with the Ministry of Justice to purchase Ex RAF Coltishall. There will also be a few ex County Councillors in need of re-homing next year after the County Elections. So the Canada geese will feel at home with some Lame Ducks!

    Report this comment

    Choice

    Sunday, June 3, 2012

  • Third go On some nature reserves they make holes in the eggs of Canada Geese as they are laid but leave them in the nest so the goose does not lay another clutch

    Report this comment

    Daisy Roots

    Saturday, June 2, 2012

  • Last time I was in Canada, in Toronto they regarded them as an unwanted pest and were trying to significantly reduce their numbers.

    Report this comment

    andy

    Tuesday, June 5, 2012

  • Having identified the trigger word stopping posts-canada geese were probably not there before PP unless they were on the settling ponds at British Sugar. canada geese are non native introduced, bigger than all the other geese, will drown chicks of grebe, ducks and moorhen etc and drive other water birds off nesting sites. They are aggressive and defend their nests. A dog trained to harry only Canada geese from roosts might do the trick as would the egg trick. As for PP-everyone bleats about recycling then when a facility is built in a good place everyone bleats about that. Where do you want it done-out of sight in China?

    Report this comment

    Daisy Roots

    Saturday, June 2, 2012

  • Where does one get that Canada Geese fly into trucks and machinery? Aircraft maybe but stationery objects and ground based moving objects, not a chance. As 1810 says they do make a nice meal if properly cooked!

    Report this comment

    canuk

    Saturday, June 2, 2012

  • they are canada geese , no such bird as canadian geese . they are a pest and will breed like rats if not controlled simple .

    Report this comment

    adinorwich

    Saturday, June 2, 2012

  • How do you get a comment past these bunny hugger mods? They prick the eggs of Canada Geese as they are laid on some nature reserves and leave them in the nest so the goose continues to sit on them and does not lay another batch.

    Report this comment

    Daisy Roots

    Saturday, June 2, 2012

  • Raises the question of what idots approved this development in the first place?

    Report this comment

    City Boy

    Saturday, June 2, 2012

  • Properly cooked they taste great!

    Report this comment

    norfolk1810

    Saturday, June 2, 2012

  • I think you'll find the geese were there before Palm Paper. Geese don't 'fly into lorries or machinery' so what is the problem? A fuss about nothing.

    Report this comment

    paddy5791

    Saturday, June 2, 2012

  • Palm Paper just needs to be a little patient. Once the waste incinerator is up and running, what comes out of the stack will pretty quickly poison the unfortunate Canada geese.

    Report this comment

    Nemesis

    Saturday, June 2, 2012

The views expressed in the above comments do not necessarily reflect the views of this site

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

loading...

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT