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Revealed: The 25 best scenic views in East Anglia

PUBLISHED: 10:00 02 July 2017 | UPDATED: 12:46 02 July 2017

Suffolk and Norfolk are home to some stunning views such as here at Aldeburgh. Picture: BARRY PULLEN

Suffolk and Norfolk are home to some stunning views such as here at Aldeburgh. Picture: BARRY PULLEN

(c) copyright citizenside.com

Visit some of the best views in Norfolk and Suffolk and enjoy the beautiful sights that are on offer this side of the country.

From rolling hills to sandy beaches, salt marshes to city skylines, East Anglia has some of the most picturesque landscapes, and therefore some of the best scenic views. These are our 25 favourites.

Holidaymakers Elaine and Keith Pickup from the Yorkshire Dales walking by Berney Arms mill. Photo: Bill Smith Holidaymakers Elaine and Keith Pickup from the Yorkshire Dales walking by Berney Arms mill. Photo: Bill Smith

1. Berney Arms Mill

Surrounded by flatlands and marshes, the Berney Arms Mill stands at 70ft tall and can be viewed from several miles around. Standing by the River Yare, it sets a classic English scene in the green heartland of the Norfolk Broads. Constructed from red brick and coated with tar, with four white sails and a fan tail, the mill is accessible by a short walk from Berney Arms railway station.

Look out over Kersey from the church. Picture: Archant Look out over Kersey from the church. Picture: Archant

2. Kersey

Kersey is a quintessential English village in the Babergh district of Suffolk with lots of narrow winding roads and beautiful historic properties. From the church on the top of the hill, the views across the village and the surrounding land are idyllic and are truly one of Suffolk’s ‘picture-postcard’ areas.

The Black Beacon at Orford Ness is part of the view from Orford Castle. Picture: NATIOANL TRUST/JUSTIN MINNS The Black Beacon at Orford Ness is part of the view from Orford Castle. Picture: NATIOANL TRUST/JUSTIN MINNS

3. Orford Castle

It can sometimes be difficult to get viewpoints in Suffolk that are high enough to see far across the county. From the top of Orford Castle, the landscape stretches out all the way to Felixstowe, including the sweep of Orford Ness and its former military buildings and the North Sea wind farms.

Salthouse Heath. Picture: ANTONY KELLY Salthouse Heath. Picture: ANTONY KELLY

4. Salthouse Heath

A ridge of heathland stretches from Salthouse all the way across to Sheringham and is an important wildlife site.

With a network of footpaths, those who visit are treated to fantastic views down over the coast, towns and villages below.

Holkham Bay on the North Norfolk Coast. Picture: JON GIBBS Holkham Bay on the North Norfolk Coast. Picture: JON GIBBS

5. Holkham Bay

Possibly one of the most beautiful bays in the country, at low tide you can walk out over the golden sand to the sea beyond. Planted to protect the land behind, the bay is surrounded by pine trees and lined by a path which makes for a lovely walk and great views over sand and marshes.

Rooftop Gardens bar and restaurant at Union.
Picture: ANTONY KELLY Rooftop Gardens bar and restaurant at Union. Picture: ANTONY KELLY

6. Rooftop Gardens, Norwich

Soak in the skyline whilst dining at Norwich’s first restaurant of this kind.

The unique urban rooftop venue boasts stunning 360 degree panoramic views of the city including the castle, the cathedral and Carrow Road.

A path through the heather at Dunwich heath. Picture: PAMELA BIDWELL A path through the heather at Dunwich heath. Picture: PAMELA BIDWELL

7. Dunwich Heath

Located near Saxmundham, from July to September Dunwich Heath is a colourful combination of purple heather and yellow gorse.

The heath has guided walks and nature trails and is home to a great number of wildlife including warblers, nightjars and woodlarks.

Take in the views from around Framlingham Castle. Picture: Alex Rood Take in the views from around Framlingham Castle. Picture: Alex Rood

8. Framlingham Castle

This view of the 12th Century monument across the wet meadows of the Mere is certainly one of the most photographed and even came top in BBC Radio Suffolk’s snap poll as the best view in the county. You can also walk along its precipitous outer walls to get beautiful views from this iconic landmark over the gentle Suffolk landscape.

View over Covehithe Broad. Picture: ROBERT MCKENNA View over Covehithe Broad. Picture: ROBERT MCKENNA

9. Cove Hithe

Just a short walk from St Andrew’s Church, which in itself makes for an appealing view as its 15th Century ruins still remain adjoining to the new church, Cove Hithe beach is another beautiful Suffolk location. The beach itself is suffering from significant ongoing erosion, but despite the decay, it makes for incredible views with eroded cliffs and a varying landscape to explore.

Dedham Vale, part of Constable Country. Picture: ARCHANT Dedham Vale, part of Constable Country. Picture: ARCHANT

10. Dedham Vale

As a fine example of English rural lowland landscape, the Dedham Vale AONB covers about 35 square miles. Picturesque villages, rolling farmland, rivers, meadows, ancient woodlands and a wide variety of local wildlife combine to create an area which has been an inspiration for many writers and artists throughout the years.

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11. Ipswich Waterfront

The waterfront in Ipswich is surrounded by beauty and history. Whether you’re enjoying a bite to eat in one of the many bars, cafes or restaurants, or gazing over the many boats moored in the marina, there are plenty of picturesque views on the quayside.

Norwich Cathedral from Mousehold Heath. Picture: Dudley Racher Norwich Cathedral from Mousehold Heath. Picture: Dudley Racher

12. Mousehold Heath, Norwich

From Mousehold Heath, the view of the Norwich city skyline is one that needs to be seen to be believed. St James’ Hill is a locally popular viewpoint on the heath, with views from the top overlooking the city’s main buildings, including the cathedral, the castle, city hall, many ancient churches and Norwich prison.

House in the Clouds, Thorpeness. Picture: Tim Denny House in the Clouds, Thorpeness. Picture: Tim Denny

13. The ‘House in the Clouds’, Thorpeness

In Thorpeness, this quirky building has been dubbed one of the most unique in the country. The ‘House in the Clouds’ is an old water tower, disguised as an overgrown house and is now used as self-catered holiday accommodation, with panoramic views across the village and The Meare.

Landguard Point in Felixstowe. Picture: ANDREW MUTIMER Landguard Point in Felixstowe. Picture: ANDREW MUTIMER

14. Landguard Point, Felixstowe

Located between Landguard Fort and the Port of Felixstowe is the John Bradfield Viewing Area. From here you can enjoy stunning views across the estuary to the Shotley Peninsula and the towns of Harwich and Dovercourt in Essex. If the weather is clear it is sometimes possible to also see the off-shore wind turbines beyond The Naze.

Scenic Roydon Common. Picture: RICHARD BRUNTON Scenic Roydon Common. Picture: RICHARD BRUNTON

15. Roydon Common, King’s Lynn

Ancient and picturesque, Norfolk Wildlife Trust’s Roydon Common is the largest surviving open heath in west Norfolk. Forming part of NWT’s Gaywood Valley Living Landscape, it shares a rich mosaic of habitats which are home to many species of wildlife including at least 15 species of dragonfly and a large number of birds such as nightjars and woodlarks.

The Orwell Bridge. Picture: MICK WEBB The Orwell Bridge. Picture: MICK WEBB

16. Orwell Bridge, Ipswich

When driving over the Orwell Bridge, it’s impossible to see how impressive it is. Therefore, this iconic piece of construction is best seen from afar - standing on the river bank at Wherstead, enjoying dinner or drinks at The Butt & Oyster pub in Pin Mill or whilst sailing down the river with Orwell River Cruises. Stretching across the beautiful River Orwell, the bridge stands at 1.2km long and an impressive 43 metres high.

Autumn walk around Snape and Iken. Picture: NICK BOULTER Autumn walk around Snape and Iken. Picture: NICK BOULTER

17. Snape Maltings to Iken

One the best ways to explore the stunning natural landscape around Snape Maltings is on foot, and a walk to Iken from this location has some beautiful views along the way. Walk along the tranquil southern shore of the River Alde to St Botolph’s Church, Iken, for idyllic landscape and wildlife views.

Steam train of the North Norfolk Railway and Weybourne Windmill seen from the Gazebo walk at Sheringham Park. Picture: NTPL/Rod Edwards Steam train of the North Norfolk Railway and Weybourne Windmill seen from the Gazebo walk at Sheringham Park. Picture: NTPL/Rod Edwards

18. Sheringham Park

Just outside the town of Sheringham, very close to Cromer, sits Sheringham Park. The colours in this park change throughout the different seasons and as a result, the views are breath-taking. For even more incredible views, hike up to the Gazebo. This viewing platform is at tree top level, hidden away in the middle of the woods and looks out over the fields towards the north Norfolk sandy coastline.

Woodbridge Tide Mill. Picture: EMANUEL RIBEIRO Woodbridge Tide Mill. Picture: EMANUEL RIBEIRO

19. Tide Mill, Woodbridge

Watching the world float by from the riverside in Woodbridge is a top sight to see in Suffolk. The wheel of the town’s Tide Mill, which has been milling since around 1170, is continually turned by the flow of the River Deben, creating this timeless view.

View from the top of St Edmundsbury Cathedral. Picture: ANDY ABBOTT View from the top of St Edmundsbury Cathedral. Picture: ANDY ABBOTT

20. St Edmundsbury Cathedral, Bury St Edmunds

Standing at the very heart of historic Bury St Edmunds is Suffolk’s only cathedral. The cathedral itself is an awe-inspiring view however, since its opening in 2005, the cathedral tower can be climbed for even further impressive views across the town. From the top of St Edmundsbury Cathedral tower, which stands at 170ft tall, you’ll have a bird’s eye view of the famous town landmarks from a whole new angle, which is well worth the 202 step climb.

A view over the rooftop's of Sheringham from Beeston Bump.
Picture: Antony Kelly A view over the rooftop's of Sheringham from Beeston Bump. Picture: Antony Kelly

21. Beeston Bump, Beeston Regis

Beeston Bump is only a mere 207ft above sea level but offers magnificent views down the coast in both directions. From the hill you can also look to the higher ground of Beeston Regis just inland. To the west you can see as far as Blakeney Point and to the east, you will see Cromer Church towering above the popular seaside town. This is truly one of the most spectacular viewpoints in the whole of Norfolk.

Blakeney Point. Picture: RICHARD BRUNTON Blakeney Point. Picture: RICHARD BRUNTON

22. Blakeney Point

This four mile spit of flint-derived shingle and sand dunes, created by longshore drift across the River Glaven, sits within the north Norfolk Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. The dynamic landscape is made up of tidal mudflats, salt marshes and reclaimed farmland, and is slowing extending to the west and moving closer to the land at a rate of about one metre a year. You can also take in the views from the water, on a boat trip from the quays at Morston and Blakeney. This is for sure the best way to see the wildlife in the area, especially seals.

Shotley Gate. Picture: MICK WEBB Shotley Gate. Picture: MICK WEBB

23. Shotley Gate

Shotley Peninsula is an extraordinary viewpoint between the River Orwell and the River Stour, where the two merge to join with the North Sea. With Felixstowe docks on the north bank and Harwich Harbour to the south, the views on offer are spectacular to behold, especially in the evenings when the lights from both harbours fill the surrounding skies.

Daffodils in the sunshine, outside Sandringham House. Picture: Ian Burt Daffodils in the sunshine, outside Sandringham House. Picture: Ian Burt

24. Sandringham House

In west Norfolk, the view of Sandringham House is popular due to its beautiful architecture and brightly coloured gardens. Sandringham’s gardens were opened to the public by King Edward VII back in 1908 and have been enjoyed by both those living in and those visiting Norfolk ever since.

River Thurne near Potter Heigham. Picture: NICK BUTCHER River Thurne near Potter Heigham. Picture: NICK BUTCHER

25. River Thurne from Potter Heigham Bridge

Although this is by no means the highest viewpoint in East Anglia, the view of the River Thurne from Potter Heigham bridge is still a view that is enjoyed by many. The medieval bridge dates back to 1385 and is a low-arched structure with a clearance of only seven feet at its highest.

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