Search

Video: Take a look at how one Lowestoft firm is revolutionising world aid efforts

11:00 22 January 2014

Business feature with Extremis Technology.
Team photo Julia Glenn, Andrew Gowan, Mark Aspinall, Dave Watson,Sebastian Lock, Alfonso Alcalde and Cillian Hickey.

Business feature with Extremis Technology. Team photo Julia Glenn, Andrew Gowan, Mark Aspinall, Dave Watson,Sebastian Lock, Alfonso Alcalde and Cillian Hickey.

A start up company wants its emergency shelters to spark a global revolution in the way communities recover from natural disasters.

Chancellor George Osborne meets the team at Lowestoft-based Extremis Technology, the company developing emergency hurricane-proof shelters for displaced people
Chancellor George Osborne meets the team at Lowestoft-based Extremis Technology, the company developing emergency hurricane-proof shelters for displaced people

Lowestoft-based Extremis Technology has pioneered two – quick-to-assemble – temporary homes, which can protect a displaced family during a humanitarian crisis.

The Hush1 and Hush2 shelters can be built without foundations and can withstand earthquake tremors and hurricane-force winds.

The innovations have already attracted interest from the United States, with a logistics firm set to become a value-added re-seller.

But the company’s main aim is to secure a distribution deal with an aid agency, so it can bring the shelters into large-scale manufacturing by 2015 or 2016.

Julia Glenn, chief executive of Extremis Technology, said the shelters would not replace the tents provided in the immediate aftermath of a disaster, but would be a community’s next step on the road to recovery.

She said: “The UN and other agencies are looking for products that can give a family the opportunity to return to normal. Our shelters last 15 years and in that time communities can be re-established.”

Andrew Gowan, chief operating officer, said it plans to manufacture the shelter locally, which could create 12 to 20 new jobs through its partners.

He said: “From loading the shelter off the lorry, to the family moving in, we have turn around of two-hours max.”

“But you have to react to a disaster, which means planning can be difficult. Currently, we are working with the University of East Anglia to create a risk map for the world.”

Invented by Dave Watson, a prototype of the Hush2 was built by building contractor R.G Carter in Drayton last month.

The firm, which has filed a global patent for the Hush2 shelter, plans to exhibit at a UN conference in February.

It comes after the firm was recently visited by the chancellor George Osborne at its offices inside the Orbis Energy Centre.

0 comments

HOT JOBS

Show Job Lists

Insight

Employers in East Anglia are paying staff more and looking at benefits packages in a bid to attract and retain staff.
Photo credit: Philip Toscano/PA Wire

If you excel at your job then now might be the time to speak to your boss about a pay rise or equally look for an upgrade in your benefits package.

                                 Managing Director of Bakers and Larners of Holt, Michael Baker, pictured at the Holt department store.

Picture: MARK BULLIMORE

Family businesses are the lifeblood of the economy, but can often be weighed down by tradition. Now a report seeks to champion the region’s oldest family firms. Business writer SABAH MEDDINGS reports.

Green 100

cover

Enjoy the Green 100
digital edition

Read

Mustard TV

Meet the Team

Mark Shields

Business Editor

|

Chris Hill

Agricultural and Farming Editor

|

Shaun Lowthorpe

Business Publishing Editor

|

Sabah Meddings

Business Writer

|

Kate Royall

Business Writer

|

Duncan Abel

Business Development Manager

Business Most Read

Awards

Norfolk Future 50 EDP Business Awards Green 100

Business Most Commented

Newsletter Sign Up