Specialist Norfolk firm Britannia Fire has unveiled a fully recyclable fire extinguisher made from the same materials as bullet-proof vests which it believes could save firms millions of pounds in wear and tear costs.

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Bosses believe the Fireworld P50, which is made from kevlar with a polyethylene outer casing instead of the traditional metal, will also save money because it is fully recyclable and does not need external servicing.

Already on the market, the firm, which employs 35 staff is looking at producing 100,000 units in the first year alone.

Designed and pioneered by Roger Carr, who launched his first extinguisher range in 1970 having set up UK Fire in 1968, the design is also carbon neutral and 100pc recyclable.

Mr Carr, who went on to launch the Britannia range with its patented balance valve in 1986, said the company was able to take the design to market thanks to the support of the business banking team at Barclays Corporate.

“The Fireworld P50 came about from listening to customers’ concerns about the escalating costs of servicing,” Mr Carr said. “It has taken four years to perfect a revolutionary fire extinguisher which requires no servicing, though every step has been rewarding.

“We have had tremendous support from our Barclays Corporate relationship director, Paul Scarlett, who has not only provided funding for the project but also support and guidance as we have gone along.

“One of the reasons we decided to move to Barclays Corporate was the time they invested to get to know our business and understand the sector we operate in. They also linked in with other key professionals and worked very much as a team to support us”.

Andy Spence, general manager of the company, based in Ashwellthorpe, near Norwich, said the carbon neutral design eliminated service visits and so reduced its carbon footprint, which would help corporations achieve their environmental targets. He said businesses would save significant amounts because they could replace existing equipment over time and it would mean reduced transit costs.

“The manufacturing process requires little energy, no shot-blasting, no painting, no welding, no de-greasing and no waste disposal,” he said. “It eliminates service visits and therefore massively reduces carbon footprint and helps corporations achieve environmental targets.”

Mr Scarlett, relationship director at Barclays Corporate, said he looked forward to supporting the business as it grew in the future.

“Roger Carr and the team have great enthusiasm for not only the new product but also the sector, which in turn drives this company forward,” he said.

4 comments

  • It's no good thinking jthompson, find out. Britannia's Fireworld self-maintenance extinguishers are a revolution within the fire safety industry. Designed and manufactured by world-renowned Britannia Fire, these extinguishers are certified to EN3 standard and are entirely self-servicing, requiring NO yearly engineer visits or re-fills for the products' entire 10 year life. Free replacement if you use it.

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    richard gray

    Tuesday, August 2, 2011

  • Sounds like the death of the profitable 'maintenance' invoicing that takes place in this industry? Does the cost of these new extinguishers outweigh that benefit?

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    Beady

    Wednesday, August 3, 2011

  • Sounds more like another British innovation to me.We (still) lead the world in inventions and technical expertise and the sooner a government realises this and gets behind our industrial innovators the better it will be for the whole industrial sector.Well done Roger Carr!

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    Mike Redco

    Wednesday, August 3, 2011

  • I dont think these extinguishers carry any British Standards like many others on the market. They are also very very expensive. It claims will save millions, not sure where that figure comes from. A standard extinguisher serviced each year for 10 years is still cheaper, and they carry all the standards insurance companies and authorising bodies look for.

    Report this comment

    jthompson

    Tuesday, August 2, 2011

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