Supermarket giants Asda have announced plans to open a second store in Norwich and create around 300 new jobs.

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The retailer is proposing to open a 35,000sqft store with a 350-space car park on the former Bally shoe factory site off Hall Road, in the south of Norwich.

The proposals also include a range of new facilities across the site, including a selection of smaller retail units, start-up business enterprise units, a pub, a gym and a new public square.

Chris Martin, Asda’s senior property communications manager, said: “We are excited to be proposing such major investment into the area, and are fully committed to finally developing such a key local site.

“We are aware that the community has been left frustrated by a lack of progress on Harford Place being redeveloped and would reassure people that we are serious and capable of bringing our plans to fruition.”

Asda is aiming to submit the planning application to Norwich City Council early next year, and ahead of that has arranged public exhibitions for next weekend at which local residents can learn more about the plans, and provide feedback.

The exhibitions will be held at St Paul’s Church Hall on Little John Road on Friday, December 9, between 1pm and 8pm, and Saturday, December 10, between 10am and 2pm.

- For much more on this story, see tomorrow’s Norwich Evening News.

25 comments

  • Waitrose is too cheap for me

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    Mad Brewer

    Thursday, December 1, 2011

  • G Webster, I wouldn't work for them if they paid me, does your wife and son still work for them ? Poor things.

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    John L Norton

    Thursday, December 1, 2011

  • clearly john norton got rejected for a job at one of their stores hence why he has such derogatory things to say. so what if the pay etc is low this is no different to other shops etc so clearly many of the millions of retail workers find a way to cope off these wages. talk sense or dont bother talking at all

    Report this comment

    G Webster

    Thursday, December 1, 2011

  • has old merry dancers silly comment been removed? i love ASDA--they are the cheapest and best.

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    bookworm

    Thursday, December 1, 2011

  • Why not tear down Anglia Square and stick it there.

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    Whiley Boy

    Thursday, December 1, 2011

  • Admittedly, the majority of the '300' jobs will be mundane and poorly paid, but surely that is infinitely better than being at home and living off benefits. Also, it will get employees into the habit of having to get up and go to work and prepare them for more rewarding and better paid employment in the future.

    Report this comment

    Mr Ed

    Thursday, December 1, 2011

  • no john my wife is retired like myself and my two sons took over my company but how is this relevant? you seem to be advocating benefits rather than actual work and this is the reason the benefits system is the way it is. people have a choice when they fill out an application form and i am sure they are aware of the pay beforehand so how can they be dead end hopeless jobs etc when people have willingly taken them in the first place

    Report this comment

    G Webster

    Thursday, December 1, 2011

  • I think the biggest loser will probably be Sainsbury's down the road.Those who support the small retailer tend to be loyal to them or less mobile.

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    Cynical Bob

    Thursday, December 1, 2011

  • messages received WhileyBoy and much appreciated.

    Report this comment

    bookworm

    Friday, December 2, 2011

  • to work in a supermarket is the modern equivalent of working in service in the 1920s.except Downton Abbey makes it look better.

    Report this comment

    bookworm

    Thursday, December 1, 2011

  • Mr Ed has a point....of course even the Chancellor concedes that better times may be on the way. Unfortunately, he estimates it'll be at least half a decade away!! For many of the people who will be forced to accept the low wages being offered in the service sector that'll be a very long time coming!

    Report this comment

    Douglas McCoy

    Thursday, December 1, 2011

  • Yes it's good to see some job's being created but unfortunately very poor dead end jobs with little hope of advancement, poor pay and a pitiful pension scheme. How do I know ? Two members of my family once worked for Asda.

    Report this comment

    John L Norton

    Thursday, December 1, 2011

  • How anyone can criticise job creation in Norwich is beyond me....lower paid jobs maybe....but 300 jobs and a platform for any potential employee to build on. Those on benefits should be encoraged to apply for any relevant roles...or have their benefits reduced.

    Report this comment

    remmucs a ton

    Thursday, December 1, 2011

  • Yes it is job creation but at the expense of whom or what ? You can look at this a completely different way. New supermarkets aren't as good news as they at first sound. You only have x number of people who will live within a certain catchments area of the planned shop and at present they will all be buying y amount of provisions at other shops, public houses, garages etc, within that area at the moment, some will be small independent shops etc. So you build a new supermarket which naturally quite a few of these people will use, won’t they ? They probably won’t be buying anymore provisions, but they will desert the other outlets they used to use which will probably eventually spell their demise, with the owners losing a business, and their employees losing their jobs, so who gains ? Probably only the supermarket at the end of the day. Unless you bring something new to the area you find there are often more losers than winners as many will know. So before people shout oh joy 300 new jobs, perhaps they should bring into play the grey matter a little more and give it some serious thought before commenting.

    Report this comment

    Catton Man

    Thursday, December 1, 2011

  • bookworm is a ledgend. Leave her alone.

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    Whiley Boy

    Thursday, December 1, 2011

  • Peter Trett's grey matter has come up with the startling revelation that shopkeepers compete with each other for business. Small shops can win on service, not price. If they get this right, they survive and find their niche alongside supermarkets which simply pile em high and sell em cheaper. If Peter had his way, the opening of any new business would be bad news because it might put pressure on similar firms which already exist. This preservation society approach may work for historic buildings, but not the high street where no shop has a divine right to exist.

    Report this comment

    a fine city

    Thursday, December 1, 2011

  • What's the difference between working at Asda or being on benefits ? I will tell you, the wages at Asda won't pay the rent, which is why many choose the latter.

    Report this comment

    John L Norton

    Thursday, December 1, 2011

  • Fine City, I suppose that's why so many small shops have closed, is that niche you mention charity shops, or fast food outlets ? The market for groceries is only so big.

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    Catton Man

    Friday, December 2, 2011

  • The economic salvation of the city will not lie in jobs like these, which can only support a part time second wage earner. As for management these positions are for those in graduate training schemes. Overall Norwich needs real jobs, high paid employment; with a skilled workforce. This is not the way, take it from a former shop worker from the capital.

    Report this comment

    chasboz

    Thursday, December 1, 2011

  • More food and retail outlets are not as important as more houses in Norwich.So why are,nt houses being built on this site?

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    Albert Cooper

    Thursday, December 1, 2011

  • I wish I could gain bookworm's respect.

    Report this comment

    Whiley Boy

    Friday, December 2, 2011

  • Even if on the minimum salary you have the knowledge that you are working for your money and contributing your share of taxation to the Treasury rather than 'sponging' of those who are in jobs if you live on 'dole money'

    Report this comment

    grandad65

    Thursday, December 1, 2011

  • no i said working in supermarkets is tough and low paid.those that put up with it get my respect.

    Report this comment

    bookworm

    Friday, December 2, 2011

  • There seems to be so much Mud Slinging between commentators,its getting just childish,lets have focused comments only re the subject

    Report this comment

    Albert Cooper

    Thursday, December 1, 2011

  • "mundane and poorly paid" eh?? jobs are boring if the people u work with are boring! min wage is now £6.09 or something, hardly poorly paid, and jobs within the supermarket industry are highly in demand, and they always offer ways into management or a particular area (bakery, butchers etc). and no, before u ask, i don't work in a supermarket. a few of my friends work in supermarkets and have been involved with enhancement schemes (john norton take note). the new asda will be within walking distance of my sisters home, which will be SUPER beneficial (saving on petrol and so on) also most supermarkets are great with flexibility RE parentchildcare issueshours, surely a good thing?

    Report this comment

    Fiona Battigan

    Thursday, December 1, 2011

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