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Low-cost grain storage option at Great Yarmouth

15:44 01 February 2014

Trevor Gates (left) and Phil Scott have 85 years combined experience trading grain at Gleadell.  Picture: Matthew Usher.

Trevor Gates (left) and Phil Scott have 85 years combined experience trading grain at Gleadell. Picture: Matthew Usher.

© Archant Norfolk 2013

A new low-cost option for storage at Gleadell’s Great Yarmouth grain terminal will offer increased flexibility for arable farmers.

Trevor Gates, who is the firm’s Swaffham-based regional manager, said that growers can join the Great Yarmouth Grain Storage Club and commit a tonnage on a priced or unpriced basis.

With the advantages including fixed storage charges, no capital outlay or joining fee, it could be the most cost effective solution especially for farmers looking to access international markets through a deep water port, said Mr Gates.

The club would arrange a couple of meetings for members to be briefed on key issues including grain marketing, seed and fertiliser.

“It has been designed as a very simple and low cost scheme for the farmer. It is not designed for farmers with crops such as malting barley which may need dressing, drying and storing for six months. As many farmers need to have access to good storage, this is a far cheaper and more flexible option.

“In recent years many farmers have increased their acreage and may be cropping an extra 50, 100 or more on top of their core acreage. This could be seen as a way of gaining access to extra storage as a form of insurance,” he added.

The club will take main stream cereal crops including feed wheat, barley and possibly oilseed rape. “We can look at all of these things,” said Mr Gates.

“If they join the club, we expect them to commit a tonnage – and it goes from there and it can be for as short or as long a period and it is totally flexible,” he added.

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