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Wymondham steelwork firm returning to its roots in energy sector

Alan Pruce, left, operations director, and Graham Newman, managing director, of Pruce Newman at Wymondham, look through a prefabricated pipe at their workshop. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY

Alan Pruce, left, operations director, and Graham Newman, managing director, of Pruce Newman at Wymondham, look through a prefabricated pipe at their workshop. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY

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A Norfolk pipework manufacturer is heading back to its roots in the energy sector as it continues on a growth trajectory.

A Future50 manufacturer is heading back to its roots in the energy sector as it continues on a growth trajectory.

Pruce Newman in Wymondham makes, installs and maintains industrial pipework and steelwork and has been targeting industries including pharmaceuticals and food and drink.

The business began in 1970 with an energy industry contract, building storage terminals on the River Thames, and the sector has always formed part of its client base – but its senior team want to explore more opportunities, particularly in the recovering oil and gas sector.

Last week saw managing director Graham Newman and marketing and communications manager Gareth Headland exhibiting at the East of England Energy Group’s (EEEGR) SNS2018 event at the Norfolk Showground, putting themselves in front of renewables and oil and gas giants.

Mr Headland said: “We help out our current clients with their energy needs, with things like combined heating and power solutions. The EEEGR event seemed like a natural way to get back into the market.

“We know there is an established supply chain for the energy sector so we know it is going to be a slow burn, but we are in it for the long haul.”

Pruce Newman, which was founded in Essex before moving its headquarters to Wymondham in 1973, has set out a 10-year growth plan which aims to double its turnover from the £9.25m it achieved in the year to May 31, 2017.

It also plans to further expand its workforce, which has doubled in the past year to 150. Most workers are based on location rather than at its Wymondham factory, with the majority of its fabrication work carried out at on-site workshops.

The business has traditionally been seasonal, with the summer being its busiest period – but Mr Headland said for the last 12 months the workload has been consistent.

“We have been consistently busy and been able to maintain those staffing levels all the way through the year, which is fantastic,” he said. “Our goal has been to level out the seasonal fluctuations and make the business more stable, whether by working in different sectors or doing different types of work for our customers.”

He added that the company was on target to meet its 10-year objectives.

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