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First power is received from Dudgeon wind farm off Norfolk coast

PUBLISHED: 11:49 10 February 2017 | UPDATED: 11:49 10 February 2017

Sea Challenger from A2Sea installing turbines at the Dudgeon offshore wind farm. Picture: Roar Lindefjeld/Woldcam - Statoil.

Sea Challenger from A2Sea installing turbines at the Dudgeon offshore wind farm. Picture: Roar Lindefjeld/Woldcam - Statoil.

Archant

The first power has been received from the Dudgeon offshore wind farm, just a month after the first turbine was installed.

Sea Challenger from A2Sea installing turbines at the Dudgeon offshore wind farm. Picture: Roar Lindefjeld/Woldcam - Statoil.Sea Challenger from A2Sea installing turbines at the Dudgeon offshore wind farm. Picture: Roar Lindefjeld/Woldcam - Statoil.

When it is completed later this year, the 67 turbines at the 402MW wind farm will generate enough power for the equivalent of 400,000 homes.

Following the installation of the first turbine in early January, operator Statoil and partners Masdar and Statkraft announced that the first turbine began delivering electricity to the national grid on Tuesday.

Margareth Øvrum, Statoil’s executive vice president for technology, projects and drilling, said: “This is a significant milestone for one of the largest offshore wind farms in Europe. I am particularly satisfied with the on-time deliveries and the health, safety and environmental performance so far.”

Some 67 foundations were installed on the Dudgeon Bank last year, along with the cables and offshore substation that collects the power from the turbines.

The work involved 2,000 vessel days and nearly the same number is anticipated this year for the installation of turbines, which should be complete by the final quarter of 2017.

The Dudgeon site is 32km off the coast of Norfolk and 20km east of the Sheringham Shoal wind farm, where Statoil currently holds a 40% share.

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