Energy industry body EEEGR to pressurise government over tax and investment

People: Powering the Future conference at the John Innes centre. Simon Gray.  Photo: Bill Smith People: Powering the Future conference at the John Innes centre. Simon Gray. Photo: Bill Smith

Thursday, July 24, 2014
10:42 AM

Energy industry bosses in the East of England are being urged to put pressure on the government to help sustain North Sea gas production and exploration.

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Simon Gray, chief executive of the East of England Energy Group (EEEGR), said he fears that without a change in the tax regime to encourage further investment, the sector could dwindle and leave gas reserves untapped when they could
help fuel the UK for decades to come.

His call comes in response to the Treasury’s search for evidence on the future of the UK oil and gas tax regime and how it should further support the industry as well as ensuring the nation receives a fair share of the profits.

He said: “I want to rally support for the industry by pointing out the dangers of premature decommissioning of gas fields and removing infrastructure in the southern North Sea.

“Instead, we need to ensure further exploration and maximise new field developments.”

“I am also asking the New Anglia LEP, chambers of commerce, economic development departments, ports, airports and all stakeholders who benefit from the offshore industry in the region to have their say.

“We must make sure that the voice of the East of England is heard as loud as those in Aberdeen and the North East and to ensure that government is aware of the particular case and issues we have here in the East of England.”

7 comments

  • It's a spudcan you muppet. And i don't even work directly in the industry

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    Tom Jeffries

    Friday, July 25, 2014

  • Mick.The fossil fuel industry seems to have access to an unlimited supply of public subsidy when the subsidy from solar has been cut to nothing and other renewables,tidal,wave,wind cut to a £200 million cap.We need a Labour government to get the Green Investment Bank redressing the balance,especially around the east coast.This is where the jobs of the future will come from.The real reason Big Oil is asking for more subsidy is that sensible private investors are pulling out of fossil fuel investments.

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    Peter Watson

    Friday, July 25, 2014

  • Oh dear, oh dear Tom. Very disbelieving arn't you. Perhaps you and Grey (who should know all this seeing as he is in such a position), would like to answer these ?. What is a spud can ?. How many conductors are there in a drilling string ?. What is a template and its purpose ?, What is the purpose of a centraliser ?, What is the common thread used in a string ?. What are the factors determined when designing a riser stack ?.

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    "V"

    Friday, July 25, 2014

  • V don't make us all laugh. If you work in the energy industry, it is selling Red Bull in a corner shop.

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    Tom Jeffries

    Thursday, July 24, 2014

  • I can think of several thousands of reasons - the people working in the Energy Sector in this region. With slow progress on a new generation of Nuclear Power Station, slower than anticipated roll-out of wind and renewables, having existing oil and gas reserves fully exploited is going to be very useful if we don't want the lights going out. Subsidies can be worthwhile to ensure that!

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    Mick Castle

    Thursday, July 24, 2014

  • How much fossil fuel subsidy do these oligopolies need?Does their greed know no bounds?

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    Peter Watson

    Thursday, July 24, 2014

  • Is this idiot for real ?. If a field becomes unsustainable then the coil company will decommission it regardless of the amount of subsidies given to them. there is a lot more expense on a rig than the cost of drilling pumping. But of course, these non jobbers at the EEEGR dont know this do they. As for saying that the East of England must be heard just as loud, has he actually seen the infrastructure in the North ease and in aberdeen ?. It is far superior than 'little old Yarmouth' who's main interest is in the low pay, long hours, slave labour holiday industry. Time you either got out or get out, and yes., I do work in the offshore industry.

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    "V"

    Thursday, July 24, 2014

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