AN ENERGY firm is bidding to build a 71-acre solar farm on land between Caister and Ormesby.

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Camborne Energy, which specialises in renewable energy, has briefed town hall bosses about its plans to establish the 14mw farm just off Nova Scotia Road, which the firm says will generate enough electricity to power approximately 4,200 homes a year.

The farm would be made up of dozens of photovoltaic cells that capture the sun’s energy and convert it into electricity. The plot of land has been chosen as it is south facing and would provide a good link up to the national power supply.

In its literature about the farm Camborne says there will be “little visual impact on the surrounding area” thanks to screening provided by existing hedgerows and trees, and the farm would still allow for animals to be grazed on the land.

An outline of the plans was presented to councillors at this month’s planning meeting. Andrew Eagle, vice chairman of Ormesby St Margaret with Scratby Parish Council, went to the presentation.

He said: “We went on a fact-finding mission, asked some questions and got some answers,” he added. “At this stage it’s just a watching brief. “Our duty is for our parishioners to gather the facts so we can then give it a full and honest airing when it comes to our planning (meeting).”

He appreciated Camborne taking the time to brief the community but said it was too early to comment specifically on the farm.

A formal planning application is expected to be submitted to Great Yarmouth Borough Council in the near future and Camborne have said it is likely to take 3-4 months to be determined. If passed construction would begin in the summer and take around 10 weeks to complete.

Once installed Camborne have said the panels would not generate any noise and would require minimal maintenance.

The solar farm is expected to have a life span of 21 years.

10 comments

  • Well as electricity consumers are being forced to pay a levy on all power they consume to subsidise "green power" and as the level of subsidy paid is dependant on how much power the solar farm actually produces, I think a 14mw farm is far more preferable to a 14MW one where the subsidy would be a billion times more !!! I was speakign to someone who had installed solar panels and was shocked by what he told me. I was under the impression that the home owner was paid for what was actually fed back into the grid but he told me that he is paid 46p for EVERY unit that the panels produce which is about 3.5 times what consumers pay for electricity they buy from the supplies. He can use as much of this as he wants. For excess that is fed back into the grid he is paid a further 2p per unit but this is not metered, they just assume that 50pc is fed back. Therefor we are effectively paying him 47p per unit for every unit he generates. TOTAL MADNESS !!!! Is it any wonder that most of us are being crippled by ever increasing energy bills :(

    Report this comment

    Katman

    Saturday, January 26, 2013

  • Well as electricity consumers are being forced to pay a levy on all power they consume to subsidise "green power" and as the level of subsidy paid is dependant on how much power the solar farm actually produces, I think a 14mw farm is far more preferable to a 14MW one where the subsidy would be a billion times more !!! I was speakign to someone who had installed solar panels and was shocked by what he told me. I was under the impression that the home owner was paid for what was actually fed back into the grid but he told me that he is paid 46p for EVERY unit that the panels produce which is about 3.5 times what consumers pay for electricity they buy from the supplies. He can use as much of this as he wants. For excess that is fed back into the grid he is paid a further 2p per unit but this is not metered, they just assume that 50pc is fed back. Therefor we are effectively paying him 47p per unit for every unit he generates. TOTAL MADNESS !!!! Is it any wonder that most of us are being crippled by ever increasing energy bills :(

    Report this comment

    Katman

    Saturday, January 26, 2013

  • This is not sustainable and one would want to know the quality of land one buries under subsidy screens and schemes. If its good enough to grow food, with prices going up, then this is not a good proposal but a tax tap.

    Report this comment

    ingo wagenknecht

    Sunday, January 27, 2013

  • @Norman Hall.. Not sure what you mean by "blighted" - Think that they will be just fields covered with photovoltaic cells - I think that I will just drive past them in the same way that I drive past sugar beet fields - someone's harvesting the energy from the sun. This isn't wind energy bye-the-way, and that in itself isn't useless - we have lots of that in the UK. The homes that will be supplied will be on the national grid, so it's a bit difficult to identify them. Yes, electricity bills are rising due to the increase in gas and oil prices, so it makes sense to explore other sources. Honestly didn't understand your last sentence.

    Report this comment

    harnser

    Saturday, January 26, 2013

  • Thoreauwas wrong, yet again, unbelievably! You really need to see someone re your obsession with irrelevant mathematical accuracy. I assume you are already in some form of secure accommodation???

    Report this comment

    Windless

    Saturday, January 26, 2013

  • UK Electricity prices are unlike some reported countries appear unregulated in relation to affordability on the basic wage... The same can be said for petrol and gas and the list goes on... The sheer lack of any regulation for so many things and a totally free society means you get what you get... in many cases unregulated RIP OFFS... But as we know it is rip off uk.

    Report this comment

    Lionel

    Saturday, January 26, 2013

  • Are we to expect that the country will be blighted by these farms ? Have we run out of places to plant the useless wind farms? Enough power for 4200 homes . Where are these homes? The electricity bills are still ascending with great rapidity. Anyone out there in EDP lands house being supplied by these greenie things?

    Report this comment

    norman hall

    Friday, January 25, 2013

  • 71 acres seems a lot of land to generate just 14mw (0.014W)!

    Report this comment

    Thoreauwasright

    Saturday, January 26, 2013

  • It is fact of life that these solar farms are new technology, and it's amazing how many houses now have these panels on the roofs. It may not please everyone to look at but it looks like the future...  Just like the Internet technology is killing the high street shops, these will be everywhere on roofs as time goes by... And no doubt solar farms will follow .. At least they are not noisy and low to the ground in a field... People moaned about sky dishes years ago... In 10 years time there will be something else new... Life goes on ... And time will always change everything... Just a shame these panels farms will not make our electricity bills cheaper... 

    Report this comment

    Lionel

    Saturday, January 26, 2013

  • "The farm would be made up of dozens of photovoltaic cells that capture the sun’s energy and convert it into electricity." I somehow don't think it'll be DOZENS! I think it'll be THOUSANDS. Either way, irrespective of the numbers, here, again, we see useable agricultural land being used to "generate" microscopic amounts of "GREEN" electricity, all financed by YOU and ME through subsidies on our utility bills. This is, by any standards, ABSURD. This planet need much more food than stupid little amounts of highly subsidised microscopic amounts of electricity. This is yet another example of RENEWABLE stupidity.

    Report this comment

    Windless

    Saturday, January 26, 2013

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